Special Issue "Managing Disaster Risk in a Changing World"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kimberley R. Miner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Army Geospatial Research Lab, Alexandria, VA; ClimateChange Institute, University of Maine, Orono, Maine, USA
Interests: Human health; Risk; Climate Change; Disaster; Planning
Dr. Shaleen Jain
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil & Environmental Engineering, and ClimateChange Institute, University of Maine, Orono, Maine; USA
Interests: Hydroclimatology; Environmental Flows; Climate Variability and Change, Hydrosystems Modeling; Adaptive Management and Decision Analysis
Dr. Anne Lausier
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, Maine; USA
Interests: Climate Change Adaptation; Society and Environment; Sustainability Management; Water Resources

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The changing physical and socio-economic climate is creating new risks worldwide. Some of these risks to human and natural system health may be foreseeable, and some may be unexpected. In an increasingly data-rich world, we have a better opportunity to understand and develop mitigation plans to address disaster risks. Successfully applying geospatial, physical, health, and climate data is critical to understanding the current state of these systems, and the way that future conditions will impact them. Already, increased drought and wildfire conditions, flooding, and stronger storms are leading to uncontrolled chemical release, water shortages, and infrastructure breakdown globally. The level of complexity of data intelligence and planning that is required can only be accomplished with collaboration among multiple sectors.

This Special Issue seeks research papers on aspects of new and emerging risks within a changing global system. We especially encourage the submission of inter-disciplinary and crosscutting research that considers cascading or cumulative risk. We also encourage the submission of manuscripts that are focused on policy or management solutions at multiple scales. We welcome original research on risk assessment, planning, or new understandings of environmental and health impacts of a changing world.

Dr. Kimberley R. Miner
Dr. Shaleen Jain
Dr. Anne Lausier
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • risk;
  • disaster;
  • climate change;
  • planning;
  • mitigation;
  • impacts;
  • communication;
  • health.

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
A Risk-Averse Shelter Location and Evacuation Routing Assignment Problem in an Uncertain Environment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 4007; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16204007 - 19 Oct 2019
Abstract
Disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes and floods continue to have devastating socioeconomic impacts and endanger millions of lives. Shelters are safe zones that protect victims from possible damage, and evacuation routes are the paths from disaster zones toward shelter areas. To enable the [...] Read more.
Disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes and floods continue to have devastating socioeconomic impacts and endanger millions of lives. Shelters are safe zones that protect victims from possible damage, and evacuation routes are the paths from disaster zones toward shelter areas. To enable the timely evacuation of disaster zones, decisions regarding shelter location and routing assignment (i.e., traffic assignment) should be considered simultaneously. In this work, we propose a risk-averse stochastic programming model with a chance constraint that takes into account the uncertainty in the demand of disaster sites while minimizing the total evacuation time. The total evacuation time reflects the efficacy of emergency management from a system optimal (SO) perspective. A conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) is incorporated into the objective function to account for risk measures in the presence of uncertain post-disaster demand. We resolve the non-linear travel time function of traffic flow by employing a second-order cone programming (SOCP) approach and linearizing the non-linear chance constraints into a new mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) reformulation so that the problem can be directly solved by state-of-the-art optimization solvers. We illustrate the application of our model using two case studies. The first case study is used to demonstrate the difference between a risk-neutral model and our proposed model. An extensive computational study provides practical insight into the proposed modeling approach using another case study concerning the Black Saturday bushfire in Australia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Disaster Risk in a Changing World)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop