New Insights into Stress Physiology and Resistance Regulation in Horticultural Plants

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Biotic and Abiotic Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 1510

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute of Lowland Forestry and Environment, University of Novi Sad, Antona Čehova 13d, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
Interests: plant biochemistry; abiotic and biotic stress; oxidative stress; priming; polyamine metabolism; mycorrhiza-induced resistance; phytoremediation; and heavy metal-induced stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the coming years, climate change will have a significant impact on crop growth, development, and production for both horticultural and agricultural plants. Climate change will impose amplified abiotic (drought, salinity, cold, heat, and heavy metals) and biotic stress factors (bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, insects, weeds) on plants, which will determine their survival depending on their adaptability. Horticultural plants have evolved and developed a wide range of strategies at the physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels to reduce the adverse effects of both biotic and abiotic stress. These underlying mechanisms enable horticultural plants to cope not only with (a)biotic stress, but also with co-occurring oxidative stress, which is defined by the elevated generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). To counteract this detrimental and oxidizing ROS effect, plants have developed enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense machinery against oxidative damage, including the boosted biosynthesis of compatible solutes with strong antioxidant and osmoprotective properties.

This Special Issue focuses on novel, innovative, and multi-perspective approaches that can be employed to examine the underlying mechanisms of adaptation and acclimation in horticultural plants that contribute to their increased tolerance to abiotic stress, as well as their increased resistance to biotic stress, at the morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels by employing cutting-edge methodologies. 

Therefore, this SI will welcome research articles and reviews that address these themes, with topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Physiological and biochemical responses related to stress tolerance and resistance
  • Modification of enzyme activities or alternation of gene expression patterns
  • Metabolic readjustments estimated either via target or non-target metabolomic approaches
  • Accumulation of specific ROS or other parameters of oxidative stress, and biosynthesis of antioxidants or compatible solutes
  • Fine tuning of phytohormones
  • Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Marko Kebert
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant stress responses
  • plant resistance
  • “omics” tools
  • oxidative stress and antioxidants
  • gene expression
  • plant defense mechanisms
  • growth
  • yield and development
  • plant hormones

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 16993 KiB  
Article
Metabolically Tailored Selection of Ornamental Rose Cultivars through Polyamine Profiling, Osmolyte Quantification and Evaluation of Antioxidant Activities
by Marko Kebert, Milena Rašeta, Saša Kostić, Vanja Vuksanović, Biljana Božanić Tanjga, Olivera Ilić and Saša Orlović
Horticulturae 2024, 10(4), 401; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10040401 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 376
Abstract
Roses (genus Rosa), renowned for their economic significance and aesthetic appeal, face multifaceted challenges in cultivation due to biotic and abiotic stressors. To address these challenges, this study explores the role of osmolytes, particularly polyamines, proline and glycine betaine, as well as [...] Read more.
Roses (genus Rosa), renowned for their economic significance and aesthetic appeal, face multifaceted challenges in cultivation due to biotic and abiotic stressors. To address these challenges, this study explores the role of osmolytes, particularly polyamines, proline and glycine betaine, as well as antioxidant capacities and condensed tannins, in enhancing stress tolerance in roses. Despite the genetic diversity inherent in roses, the metabolic aspect of stress tolerance has been underexplored in breeding programs. This paper investigates the intraspecific variability among 22 rose cultivars, focusing on osmolyte content (proline and glycine betaine), individual polyamines (putrescine, spermine and spermidine), as well as antioxidant activities, measuring radical scavenging capacity against 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS•+) and NO radicals. Employing a targeted metabolomic approach, we quantified the levels of individual polyamines in both the petals and leaves of rose cultivars. This was achieved through high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescent detection following a derivatization pretreatment process. Within the evaluated cultivars, “Unique Aroma”, “Andre Rieu”, “Aroma 3”, “Frayla Marija” and “Trendy Fashion” stood out for their significantly elevated levels of total foliar polyamines. The predominant polyamine detected at both petal and leaf levels was putrescine, with concentrations ranging from 335.81 (“Zora Frayla”) to 2063.81 nmol g−1 DW (“Unique Aroma”) at the leaf level. Following putrescine, foliar spermidine levels varied from 245.08 (“Olivera Frayla”) to 1527.16 nmol g−1 DW (“Andre Rieu”). Regarding antioxidant capacity, the leaf extracts of rose cultivars “Zora Frayla” and “Natalija Frayla” were prominent by showing 68.08 and 59.24 mmol Trolox equivalents (TE) g−1 DW, respectively. The results highlight the intricate biochemical variability across rose cultivars and show that osmolytes, such as glycine betaine, proline and polyamines, and other biochemical markers can be used as reliable criteria for the selection of rose cultivars that are more resilient to biotic stress factors, especially powdery and downy mildew. Bridging fundamental research with practical applications, this study aims to contribute to the development of stress-tolerant rose cultivars adaptable to dynamic environmental conditions. Full article
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15 pages, 8610 KiB  
Article
Differentiating Leaf Structures and Physiological Responses to Freezing Stress of Mangrove Kandelia obovata from Different Provenances
by Wenzhen Xin, Xia An, Huizi Liu, Shuangshuang Liu, Sheng Yang, Xin Wei, Jiali Zhao, Renan Lin, Xing Liu and Qiuxia Chen
Horticulturae 2024, 10(2), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10020182 - 17 Feb 2024
Viewed by 627
Abstract
Kandelia obovata (Rhizophoraceae) is the most cold-tolerant mangrove species and has been widely used in coastal wetland ecological restoration due to its specific viviparous phenomenon, beautiful shape, and unique floral pattern. Due to long-term adaptation to their local environment, the phenotypic characteristics and [...] Read more.
Kandelia obovata (Rhizophoraceae) is the most cold-tolerant mangrove species and has been widely used in coastal wetland ecological restoration due to its specific viviparous phenomenon, beautiful shape, and unique floral pattern. Due to long-term adaptation to their local environment, the phenotypic characteristics and stress resistance of widely distributed plants of the same species often differentiate across different locations. The capacity for cold resistance is closely linked to the physiological and structural characteristics of plants. Herein, we explored the temporal variations in the leaf structure and physiological status of K. obovata under −5.5 °C from different areas such as Jiulongjiang Estuary (JLJ, 24°25′ N), Fujian Province, and Longgang City (LG, 27°34′ N) and Jiaojiang District (JJ, 28°67′ N), Zhejiang Province. The morphological variations implied that the cold resistance of K. obovata obviously strengthened after the northward migration and acclimatization, in the following order: LG > JJ > JLJ. More specifically, after exposure to a sustained low temperature, the relative conductivity (REC), an index widely used to evaluate the degree of plant damage, remarkably increased from 33.62 ± 2.39 to 63.73 ± 3.81, 31.20 ± 1.63 to 49.48 ± 1.12, and 23.75 ± 0.13 to 54.24 ± 1.45 for JLJ, LG, and JJ, respectively (p < 0.05). Additionally, the palisade-to-spongy tissue ratio (P/I) of JLJ and JJ decreased from 0.78 ± 0.05 and 0.75 ± 0.03 to 0.5 ± 0.04 and 0.64 ± 0.02 (p < 0.05), whereas no significant changes were found in LG (p > 0.05). The SOD activity of LG significantly kept increasing, with values increased from 352.49 ± 10.38 to 477.65 ± 1.78 U·g−1, whereas no apparent changes in JLJ and JJ were observed with the sustained low temperature. The results of this study improved our understanding of the response of K. obovata to freezing stress, which could provide a sound theoretical foundation for cultivating cold-resistant varieties, as well as expanding mangrove plantations in higher latitudes. Full article
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