Special Issue "Geology and Heritage: From Natural to Built Heritage"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Miguel Gomez-Heras

Departamento de Geología y Geoquímica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34-914-975-407
Interests: stone decay; rock weathering; built heritage; geoheritage; non-destructive testing; thermography
Guest Editor
Dr. Monica Alvarez de Buergo

Geosciences Institute IGEO, Spanish Research Council CSIC and Complutense University of Madrid UCM, Calle del Doctor Severo Ochoa 7, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Phone: +34 913 947 879
Interests: heritage science; stone decay; conservation techniques assessment; petrophysical properties; non-destructive techniques; geomaterials; built cultural heritage; geomonumental routes; protective patinas; historical quarries

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Heritage aims to gather high-quality original research articles and technical notes on the study of geological materials and their properties in the context of Natural and Built Heritage. Material properties characterisation and decay assessment are crucial issues for the conservation of both built heritage and geosites of which relevance may lie upon the preservation of localised features, as it is the case of ichnites, mushroom rocks and pinnacles. The last few years have witnessed large improvements in relation to the characterization of materials and their decay in a heritage context, particularly due to the advancement of non-destructive techniques and data representation and visualisation. This Special Issue aims to gather current developments of measurement techniques and data representation in the context of geoheritage and stone-built heritage. In addition, a combined approach of rock decay assessment in geosites and stone-built heritage is useful to understand processes and plan conservation in the frame of protected areas, such as UNESCO’s Global Geoparks, which foster the use of geological heritage in connection with all other aspects of the area’s natural and cultural heritage. The Special Issue welcomes case studies in which good practices on risk and decay assessment led to successful planning of conservation interventions. The editors would like to invite submissions on experimental research or case studies in following topics:

  • Laboratory studies on rock weathering.
  • Use of non-destructive-techniques for assessing decay processes.
  • Case studies of geosites and/or stone-built heritage decay and conservation.
  • Comparative studies of rock decay in natural environments and man-made constructions.
  • Identification, characterization, and management of geoheritage.

We would appreciate receiving from potential authors a short abstract outlining the purpose of the research and the principal results obtained, in order to verify if intended contribution fit in the aims of this Special Issue.

Dr. Miguel Gomez-Heras
Dr. Monica Alvarez de Buergo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Salt Weathering of 7th Century CE Granite Monument of Shore Temple, Mahabalipuram – Scientific Investigation and Conservation Strategy
Heritage 2019, 2(1), 230-253; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage2010017
Received: 11 October 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 14 January 2019 / Published: 17 January 2019
PDF Full-text (1786 KB)
Abstract
Salt-induced deterioration of architectural heritage is accelerated drastically in marine environments. This paper investigates the deterioration mechanism of the Shore Temple using various analytical techniques. Deteriorated and pristine stone samples were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), thin section studies, and SEM in
[...] Read more.
Salt-induced deterioration of architectural heritage is accelerated drastically in marine environments. This paper investigates the deterioration mechanism of the Shore Temple using various analytical techniques. Deteriorated and pristine stone samples were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), thin section studies, and SEM in order to understand the deterioration mechanism. The meteorological and micro-climatic conditions of Shore Temple in the tropical Indian climate were studied, as they have played a vital role in the deterioration of the stone matrix. The sides of the temple that face the sea as well as the upper part of the temple show intense alveolarization and the stone variety was petrologically identified as “garnetiferous hornblende biotite granite”. The evaluation of results in terms of the efficacy of ethyl silicate consolidation of stone after desalination is very difficult due to continuous sea sprays. The compatible lime rendering evidenced in the shelter area and then scientifically examined during this study may be applied as a protective layer to safeguard and conserve the lone Pallava edifice on the seashore from deterioration in tropical and hygric saline conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geology and Heritage: From Natural to Built Heritage)
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