Special Issue "Interprofessional Collaboration in Healthcare Education, Practice, and Research"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Medics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 2309

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Deborah Witt Sherman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate Nursing, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
Interests: interprofessional collaboration in healthcare education; practice, and research; palliative care; breast cancer; quality of life; caregiving
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Monica Hough
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Communication Science and Disorder, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
Interests: communication science and disorder

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Healthcare focuses on interprofessional collaboration in healthcare education, clinical practice, and research. There will be an emphasis on a University-wide approach to interprofessional collaboration, including the importance of Interprofessional Strategic Planning to identify a vision, mission, goals, and strategies, and University support and resources for interprofessional events and initiatives. Engagement of the faculty begins with engagement of the University Faculty Senate through the development of a Senate Interprofessional Committee and representation of faculty across Colleges and Departments of Medicine, Nursing, Public Health, and the Health Sciences in the development of curricular, course, clinical, and research/scholarship interprofessional initiatives. There will be a focus on interprofessional competencies and relevant teaching and learning strategies. The theoretical basis for interprofessional collaboration as a guide for assessments, team-based interventions, and research in healthcare will be explored. The evidence base for interprofessional processes and outcomes will be analyzed with leading-edge recommendations for the promotion of interprofessional collaboration in healthcare education, practice, and research.

Prof. Deborah Witt Sherman
Dr. Monica Hough
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Interprofessional
  • Collaboration
  • Healthcare
  • Education
  • Clinical Practice
  • Research
  • Interprofessional Competencies
  • Interprofessional Processes
  • Interprofessional Outcomes
  • Interprofessional Strategic Planning

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Inter-Professional Collaboration and Occupational Well-Being of Physicians Who Work in Adverse Working Conditions
Healthcare 2021, 9(9), 1210; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9091210 - 14 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 562
Abstract
Inter-professional collaboration, empathy and lifelong learning, components of medical professionalism, have been associated with occupational well-being in physicians. However, it is not clear whether this role persists in adverse working conditions. This study was performed to assess whether this is the case. These [...] Read more.
Inter-professional collaboration, empathy and lifelong learning, components of medical professionalism, have been associated with occupational well-being in physicians. However, it is not clear whether this role persists in adverse working conditions. This study was performed to assess whether this is the case. These three abilities, and the self-perception of somatization, exhaustion and work alienation, were measured in a sample of 60 physicians working in a hospital declared to be in an institutional emergency. A multiple regression model explained 40% of the variability of exhaustion, with a large effect size (Cohen’s-f2 = 0.64), based on a linear relationship with teamwork (p = 0.01), and more dedication to academic (p < 0.001) and management activities (p < 0.003). Neither somatization nor alienation were predicted by empathy or lifelong learning abilities. Somatization, exhaustion, or alienation scores either explained empathy, inter-professional collaboration or lifelong learning scores. These findings indicate that, in adverse working environments, physicians with a greater sense of inter-professional collaboration or performing multi-task activities are more exposed to suffering exhaustion. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Nurse’s Role from Medical Students’ Perspective during Their Interprofessional Clinical Practice: Evidence from Lithuania
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 963; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9080963 - 29 Jul 2021
Viewed by 541
Abstract
Background: Attitudes towards interprofessional education are key factors that shape students’ behaviour during interprofessional practice. An interprofessional approach to training and practice is “unique”, important, and challenging. Interprofessional education allows for a deeper understanding and analysis of problems from perspectives different to those [...] Read more.
Background: Attitudes towards interprofessional education are key factors that shape students’ behaviour during interprofessional practice. An interprofessional approach to training and practice is “unique”, important, and challenging. Interprofessional education allows for a deeper understanding and analysis of problems from perspectives different to those of “us”. The aim of the study was to assess medical students’ attitudes toward the nurse’s role during their interprofessional clinical practice. Methods: This study used a descriptive, correlational design. Results: Lithuanian medical students were statistically significantly more likely to think that the role of a nurse was clear and transparent to other professionals and that nurses exuded a high degree of professionalism, sought a high degree of involvement with the patient, and built deep relationships with the patients. Foreign medical students were statistically significantly more likely to believe that nurses worked more effectively alone than in a team and that they worked with the patients within their own professional field of knowledge rather than referring patients to other professionals. Conclusions: After 6 months of interprofessional training with nurses in the hospital, medical students gain a more clear professional picture of the role of the nurse. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Needs Assessment for Interprofessional Education: Implications for Integration and Readiness for Practice
Healthcare 2021, 9(4), 411; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9040411 - 02 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 642
Abstract
Interprofessional education (IPE) is an important concept to promote health professionals for interprofessional collaboration. Successful implementation of IPE in health education programs requires consideration of readiness and effectiveness and faces some challenges/barriers. The aim of this study was to examine the perception, understanding [...] Read more.
Interprofessional education (IPE) is an important concept to promote health professionals for interprofessional collaboration. Successful implementation of IPE in health education programs requires consideration of readiness and effectiveness and faces some challenges/barriers. The aim of this study was to examine the perception, understanding and attitude of health profession students and faculty members toward IPE. A cross-sectional study was conducted with students and faculty members from six health professions at Taif University. The study involved administration of the Readiness for Inter-Professional Learning Scale (RIPLS) questionnaire to all students. In addition, focus groups were conducted separately with both students and faculty members. The study showed that only 10 participants (four students, six faculty members) indicated their previous knowledge of IPE. IPE remains a new approach for the majority of students and faculty members. There was no significant difference in the readiness of IPE between professions. Students and faculty members showed positive attitudes toward the IPE curriculum and they believe that it will improve medical education at our university. Full article
Back to TopTop