Special Issue "The Challenges of Caring of Neurodegenerative Diseases"

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Daniel Kam Yin CHAN Website E-Mail
Department of Aged Care and Rehabilitation, University of New South Wales, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, NSW 2200, Australia
Interests: ageing and services; Parkinson’s disease; dementia; stroke; falls

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neurodegenerative diseases in the elderly are on the increase globally and are challenging problems shared by many developed countries, as well as developing ones. Development of aged care services to face the increase of an older population can be a difficult problem for many developing countries without past experience to work from. Sharing of knowledge and lessons between developing and developed countries is a good way forward.

This Special Issue, therefore, focuses broadly on a wide range of issues relevant to aged care services development (acute care, subacute care and long term care) in developed and developing countries. Issues facing China and Australia will be used as examples but invitation for submission will not be limited to these two countries. These issues include how neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia, are being dealt with at hospital and in the community, how does families in China find caring for older generation (given that China has an ageing population and a reduced number of younger population staying at home). How Australia has coped with similar problems in the last few decades and so on. Submitted manuscripts describing current research, review articles and communications in any of these areas are sought.

Prof. Dr. Daniel Kam Yin CHAN
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geriatrics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • dementia
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Aged care services
  • Acute care, subacute care or rehabilitation for older people
  • Residential aged care facilities
  • costs
  • impact on families
  • carer

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Hospital Design on Acutely Unwell Patients with Dementia
Geriatrics 2017, 2(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics2010004 - 12 Jan 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Increasing emphasis on patient privacy and satisfaction has seen more 100% single-room hospitals opened across the UK. Few studies have addressed the impact of these new hospital designs (single rooms) on clinical outcomes specifically for acutely unwell frail patients with dementia. The objective [...] Read more.
Increasing emphasis on patient privacy and satisfaction has seen more 100% single-room hospitals opened across the UK. Few studies have addressed the impact of these new hospital designs (single rooms) on clinical outcomes specifically for acutely unwell frail patients with dementia. The objective of this study was to profile and compare the clinical outcomes of acutely unwell patients with dementia admitted to two different hospital environments. This prospective observation study was conducted for 100 dementia patients admitted at Ysbyty Ystrad Fawr (hospital with 100% single rooms) and Royal Gwent Hospital (traditional multi-bed wards) under the same University Health Board. The length of stay (LoS) was significantly longer for patients admitted to single rooms. The clinical profile of the patients was similar in both hospitals and has no association with LoS. There was no significant difference in terms of incidence of inpatient falls, fall-related injury, discharge to a new care home, 30-day readmission, or mortality. The single room environment appears to influence LoS, as previously reported; however, following the introduction of quality improvement initiatives to prevent inpatient falls, single rooms do not appear to be associated with higher inpatient fall incidence. We propose more research to understand the relationship between single rooms and LoS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges of Caring of Neurodegenerative Diseases)
Open AccessArticle
Integrated Care for People with Dementia—Results of a Social-Scientific Evaluation of an Established Dementia Care Model
Geriatrics 2017, 2(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics2010001 - 27 Dec 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
Currently, approximately 46.8 million people worldwide and 1.47 million German people are affected by dementia. The rising numbers of cases of people with dementia, the need for complex care and the insufficient care available call for innovative and sustainable solutions both in Germany [...] Read more.
Currently, approximately 46.8 million people worldwide and 1.47 million German people are affected by dementia. The rising numbers of cases of people with dementia, the need for complex care and the insufficient care available call for innovative and sustainable solutions both in Germany and many other countries. This article presents results of the social-scientific evaluation of an established care model for people with dementia developed by the professionals as a result of acute problems in care in north-east Germany. In addition to the central elements of the model, the conditions of intersectoral and interprofessional cooperation as well as the qualification profile requirements of the professional groups involved are presented in detail. The results can give suggestions for the organization of integrated care for people with dementia in other countries. Further, the author would hereby like to highlight the gain from the scientific examination of solutions to problems in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges of Caring of Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Family Carers of People with Young-Onset Dementia: Their Experiences with the Supporter Service
Geriatrics 2016, 1(4), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics1040028 - 05 Nov 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
Background: Family carers and people with young-onset dementia (YOD) require tailored assistance as dementia progresses. A variety of health care services is needed, including supporter services. To our knowledge, research focusing on experiences with the supporter service is scarce. Aim: To evaluate the [...] Read more.
Background: Family carers and people with young-onset dementia (YOD) require tailored assistance as dementia progresses. A variety of health care services is needed, including supporter services. To our knowledge, research focusing on experiences with the supporter service is scarce. Aim: To evaluate the supporter service by examining how primary family carers experience the assistance provided. Method: Qualitative interviews with 16 primary family carers of people with YOD were performed from 2014 to 2015. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Three main themes emerged from the interviews. First, a good match focused on the carers’ experiences of the relationship between the supporter and the person with YOD and included three subthemes: a nice, empathetic personality, a friendship-like relationship, and the content of the meetings. The second theme, relief, addressed the carers’ experiences with the service. The third, coordination, concerned the carers’ relationship with the health care service. Conclusion: Developing tailored services and assistance initiatives is important. A well-organized supporter service is a valuable supplement to formal programs and should be developed as part of an overall support package. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges of Caring of Neurodegenerative Diseases)

Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Managing Ethical Dilemmas in End-Stage Neurodegenerative Diseases
Geriatrics 2017, 2(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics2010008 - 20 Jan 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Neurodegenerative diseases are chronic, progressive and incurable illnesses that ultimately lead to death. The patient deteriorates inexorably towards the terminal phase of the disease when he becomes mentally and physically incapacitated. This article discusses the many ethical and moral dilemmas faced by the [...] Read more.
Neurodegenerative diseases are chronic, progressive and incurable illnesses that ultimately lead to death. The patient deteriorates inexorably towards the terminal phase of the disease when he becomes mentally and physically incapacitated. This article discusses the many ethical and moral dilemmas faced by the clinician and family members as they care for patients with neurodegenerative illnesses approaching the end of life. Topics discussed will include steps on how to assess mental capacity and decision-making capability, advance care planning, withholding and/or withdrawing treatment, food refusal, the do-not-resuscitate order and euthanasia. An approach to ethical decision-making incorporating Jonsen’s 4-topic approach will also be discussed briefly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges of Caring of Neurodegenerative Diseases)
Open AccessReview
Challenges of Dementia Care in China
Geriatrics 2017, 2(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics2010007 - 18 Jan 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
Dementia results in brain dysfunction, disability and dependency among affected people, causing an overwhelming burden for caregivers. China has the largest number of people with dementia worldwide and is facing severe challenges with respect to dementia care, including poor awareness of dementia in [...] Read more.
Dementia results in brain dysfunction, disability and dependency among affected people, causing an overwhelming burden for caregivers. China has the largest number of people with dementia worldwide and is facing severe challenges with respect to dementia care, including poor awareness of dementia in the public, inadequate knowledge of dementia for medical professionals and caregivers, an underdeveloped dementia service system, and high costs of dementia care. To address these challenges, China is taking action to increase dementia awareness and education among the public and care providers, and develop policies, services and resources for dementia care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges of Caring of Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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Open AccessReview
Neuroprotective Effect of Several Phytochemicals and Its Potential Application in the Prevention of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Geriatrics 2016, 1(4), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics1040029 - 12 Nov 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
The detrimental effects of oxidative stress and chronic neuroinflammation on neuronal cell death have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). The nutritional neuroscience is quickly growing, and phytochemicals or phytobioactive compounds such [...] Read more.
The detrimental effects of oxidative stress and chronic neuroinflammation on neuronal cell death have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). The nutritional neuroscience is quickly growing, and phytochemicals or phytobioactive compounds such as curcumin, resveratrol, propolis, ginsenoside, and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been extensively applied to potential therapeutic purposes for numerous neurodegenerative diseases for their anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, their administration as food supplements in the daily diet of the elderly is normally a voluntary and less-organized behavior, indicating the uncertainty of therapeutic effects in this sporadic population; specifically, the effective physiological dosages and the real positive effects in preserving brain health have not yet been fully elucidated. In this review, we collect several lines of evidence on these compounds, which constitute a major type of nutraceuticals and are widely integrated into the daily anti-aging caring of elderly patients, and discuss the underlying anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of these phytochemicals. In conclusion, we highlight the implications of these compounds in the prevention and treatment of geriatric diseases, and of the potential supplementation procedures used as a dietary therapeutic program in clinical nursing services for patients with neurodegenerative diseases or for the elderly in certain communities, which we hope will lead to more beneficial health outcomes with respect to brain function, innate immunity, and gastrointestinal function, as well as more economic and social benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges of Caring of Neurodegenerative Diseases)

Other

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Open AccessDiscussion
Dementia: Sustaining Self in the Face of Cognitive Decline
Geriatrics 2016, 1(4), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics1040025 - 21 Oct 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
It is argued that the way in which we view a person with dementia can have a significant effect on the level of disability and wellbeing of the person. There is a divergence between a belief that the self disintegrates, leaving a non-person, [...] Read more.
It is argued that the way in which we view a person with dementia can have a significant effect on the level of disability and wellbeing of the person. There is a divergence between a belief that the self disintegrates, leaving a non-person, and a belief that the self remains but is misplaced and can be maintained with the appropriate approach from others. This article seeks to examine the differing approaches to self and personhood in dementia care, and establish ways of approaching care for the person with dementia which may limit the extent of disability in the face of cognitive decline. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges of Caring of Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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