Special Issue "Ageing, A Multidisciplinary Perspective"

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Healthy Aging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Patricia Schofield

Faculty of Health, Social Care, and Education, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: pain; ageing; dementia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to addressing aging-related issues, including improving quality of life and fostering independent living. With our innovative technology-enabled health solutions, we aim to support older people to manage their conditions, which may result from the physical and biological processes of ageing. Through these innovations, we aim to bring greater sustainability to technology-enabled health services, in order to create business opportunities and economic growth.

As authors working together in our Positive Ageing Institute (PARI), our shared vision of aging is one that considers older people as valuable assets to society/community, employment, business, economy, culture/the arts and policy development and change. With this vision in mind, we take our lead from older people, exploring their perceptions of what positive ageing is and what it means to them. We also emphasise our focus on the future ageing population recognising the changing needs of different generations and individuals.

This collection of papers represent our work and bring together the multidisiplinary team. We address some of the key issues highlighted by older adults as influencing positive ageing. Such issues may include health, but also the socio-economic factors such as pensions, finance or work. This demonstrates the research focus of PARI now and where we plan to go in the future.

Prof. Dr. Patricia Schofield
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geriatrics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Religion
  • Spirituality
  • Housing
  • BAME
  • End of Life
  • Work
  • Vitamin D
  • Ethics
  • Technology

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Acceptability of Paper-Based Advance Care Planning (ACP) to Inform End-of-Life Care Provision for Community Dwelling Older Adults: A Qualitative Interview Study
Received: 20 September 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 5 December 2018
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Abstract
This paper reports the findings from a study to investigate health care professionals’ views regarding the use and acceptability of two similar paper-based advance care planning (ACP) documents designed for older adults in their last year of life to inform end-of-life care provision. [...] Read more.
This paper reports the findings from a study to investigate health care professionals’ views regarding the use and acceptability of two similar paper-based advance care planning (ACP) documents designed for older adults in their last year of life to inform end-of-life care provision. Participants’ views of using PEACE (Proactive Elderly Persons Advisory Care), a nurse led model with community geriatrician oversight, and PACe (proactive anticipatory care plan), a general practitioner (GP) led model implemented by two clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) as part of a wider pilot to determine their ability to improve end-of-life care provision, were explored. Hospital admission avoidance matrons took part in face to face interviews and care staff employed in private residential care homes took part in individual telephone interviews to explore their views of using the PEACE tool. Telephone interviews were conducted with GPs to explore their views of PACe. GPs and admission avoidance matrons were employed by CCGs and all study participants were recruited from the South East of England, where data collection took place in 2015. The data were analysed thematically. Findings from the study demonstrate how both tools provide a focus to ACP discussions to inform individual end-of-life care preferences. The importance of relationships was a pivotal theme established, trusting inter-professional relationships to enable multidisciplinary teamwork and a prior relationship with the older person (or their proxy in the case of cognitive impairment) to enable such conversations in the first place. Both tools enabled participants to think critically and reflect on their own practice. Notwithstanding participants’ views to improve their layout, using a paper-based approach to deliver streamlined ACP and end-of-life care was a theme to emerge as a potential barrier, and highlighted problems with accessing paper-based documentation, accuracy and care co-ordination in the context of multidisciplinary team working. The value of technology in overcoming this barrier and underpinning ACP as a means to help simplify service provision, promote integrated professional practice and provide seamless care, was put forward as a way forward. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing, A Multidisciplinary Perspective)
Open AccessArticle
Culture, Ageing and the Construction of Pain
Received: 22 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
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Abstract
In this paper, the authors seek to discuss some of the complexities involved in cross-cultural working in relation to the communication and management of pain in older people. Specifically, the paper addresses the culture construction of ageing and how pain is often constructed [...] Read more.
In this paper, the authors seek to discuss some of the complexities involved in cross-cultural working in relation to the communication and management of pain in older people. Specifically, the paper addresses the culture construction of ageing and how pain is often constructed as a natural part of ageing. The authors also suggest that with the rise of the ideology of active-ageing, many older people who are disabled or living in chronic pain, may feel a moral imperative to hide pain and ill-health. The discussion extends into looking at the impact of culture and the communication of pain, including specific idioms of distress, somaticize and the lay-management of pain through stoicism. The literature utilised in this paper was based on a thematic review, exploring the cultural dimensions of health, illness and pain in old age. The review also drew on the authors’ previous publications, as well as their extensive community research experience working with ethnic minority communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing, A Multidisciplinary Perspective)
Open AccessArticle
A Qualitative Exploratory Study of Informal Carers’ Experiences of Identifying and Managing Oral Pain and Discomfort in Community-Dwelling Older People Living with Dementia
Received: 14 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 16 June 2018 / Published: 21 June 2018
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Abstract
Increased prevalence of dementia and poor oral health in older people is associated with more people living with dementia who experience oral pain and discomfort. However, little is known about how informal carers manage oral pain for people living with dementia in the [...] Read more.
Increased prevalence of dementia and poor oral health in older people is associated with more people living with dementia who experience oral pain and discomfort. However, little is known about how informal carers manage oral pain for people living with dementia in the community. This study aimed to explore informal carers’ experiences of identifying and managing oral pain and discomfort in people living with dementia, and barriers and enablers they encountered. Focus groups with informal carers of people living with dementia were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using thematic analysis. Carers’ accounts suggested that day-to-day contact was required to identify oral pain and discomfort, and a symptomology of the signs and symptoms was developed. Carers’ accounts also highlighted issues in maintaining oral health, difficulties in accessing the mouth, managing dentures, competing demands, and difficulties in accessing treatment due to health service-, behavioural- and treatment- related barriers. Enablers included informal carers’ pivotal role in the identifying and managing oral pain and discomfort in people living with dementia. The study concludes that carers want more partnership work with dental professionals, and clearer care pathways are required to meet the oral health needs of people living with dementia who experience oral pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing, A Multidisciplinary Perspective)
Open AccessArticle
The Role of Religion, Spirituality and/or Belief in Positive Ageing for Older Adults
Received: 10 May 2018 / Revised: 30 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 June 2018 / Published: 8 June 2018
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Abstract
(1) Background: The concept of positive ageing is gaining recognition as an approach to better understand the lives of older adults throughout the world. Positive ageing encompasses the various ways in which older adults approach life challenges associated with ageing and how certain [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The concept of positive ageing is gaining recognition as an approach to better understand the lives of older adults throughout the world. Positive ageing encompasses the various ways in which older adults approach life challenges associated with ageing and how certain approaches allow older adults to age in a more positive way. This paper makes a contribution to the field by examining the role of religion, spirituality and/or belief in relation to positive ageing; (2) Methods: Qualitative focus groups with 14 older adults living in West London explored the role and importance religion, spirituality and/or belief held in their everyday lives and how this could be incorporated into the idea of positive ageing; (3) Results: Religion, spirituality and/or belief were found to play a number of roles in the everyday lives of the older adults, including being a source of strength, comfort and hope in difficult times and bringing about a sense of community and belonging; (4) Conclusion: This paper argues that religion, spirituality and/or belief should be included within positive ageing literature and be viewed as a type of support (amongst multiple others) that helps older adults to live positive lives despite the many challenges of ageing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing, A Multidisciplinary Perspective)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Exploring the Concept of ‘Positive Ageing’ in the UK Workplace—A Literature Review
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
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Abstract
The participation rate of older people in the labour market is forecast to increase due to demographic changes afoot. For example, low fertility rates, higher life expectancy, and increases in the retirement age will affect labour availability. The working-age population trends indicate that [...] Read more.
The participation rate of older people in the labour market is forecast to increase due to demographic changes afoot. For example, low fertility rates, higher life expectancy, and increases in the retirement age will affect labour availability. The working-age population trends indicate that the age group 55–64 years will expand. This trend is bolstered by policy debate about the sustainability of economic and social support systems for the wider population and necessary strategies to keep older workers in labour markets. Within the UK, as the statutory pension age is placed now at 67, changes affecting the national default retirement age (previously age 60 for women and 65 for men) already mean that many older workers will feature in workplaces past historical expectations. A lack of sensitivity about the adjustments older workers needed, due to age-related changes in health and functional capacities, attests the demoted valuing of ageing workers. Despite a rise in the importance of wisdom across cultures, the significance of experience that comes with ageing, however, has become less revered within the UK resulting in less than the institutional promotion of Positive Ageing might depict. This paper draws from a structured review of literature (SLR) which seeks to address the question of what is currently identified as ‘Positive Ageing’ to consider what contributions can be found in current literature that may represent these changes in the UK. The paper concludes that demographic change has stimulated significant re-thinking of workplace strategies for the maintenance of health and well-being of ageing workers at national or governmental policy levels. To ensure sustainability, workability, and productivity in work, however, the concept of Positive Ageing towards later life might be furthered despite that, at the organizational level, its enactment remains incomplete currently post retirement age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing, A Multidisciplinary Perspective)
Open AccessReview
Screening Methods for Age-Related Hearing Loss in Older Patients with Cancer: A Review of the Literature
Received: 17 July 2018 / Revised: 30 July 2018 / Accepted: 31 July 2018 / Published: 2 August 2018
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Abstract
As people grow older, they may experience loss in hearing sensitivity. Age-related hearing loss may negatively affect the patient’s quality of life as it may lead to social isolation. In older patients with cancer, hearing loss can seriously interfere with the patient’s ability [...] Read more.
As people grow older, they may experience loss in hearing sensitivity. Age-related hearing loss may negatively affect the patient’s quality of life as it may lead to social isolation. In older patients with cancer, hearing loss can seriously interfere with the patient’s ability to deal properly with all aspects of their disease, and may have a cumulative effect on their already decreased quality of life. Therefore, the proper screening of those conditions is essential in order to optimise the patient’s comfort during and after treatment. This review article aims at providing a concise image of the nature of age-related hearing loss, and provides an overview of the screening methods that could be used in older patients with cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing, A Multidisciplinary Perspective)
Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Older Adults’ Beliefs, Knowledge and Preferences for Achieving Healthy Vitamin D Status: A Narrative Review
Received: 31 March 2018 / Revised: 18 May 2018 / Accepted: 29 May 2018 / Published: 30 May 2018
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Abstract
Autonomy and mobility are, in many cases, key elements underlying positive ageing. Vitamin D (vitD) is essential to maintaining musculoskeletal health and hence mobility; ensuring adequate vitD status is important in positive ageing. However, vitD deficiency persists in ~10–30% of older adults in [...] Read more.
Autonomy and mobility are, in many cases, key elements underlying positive ageing. Vitamin D (vitD) is essential to maintaining musculoskeletal health and hence mobility; ensuring adequate vitD status is important in positive ageing. However, vitD deficiency persists in ~10–30% of older adults in the Western world. The aim of this review was to explore older adult vitD beliefs, knowledge and preferences, in order to identify means to prevent vitD deficiency respectful of older peoples’ autonomy. Academic search-engines were used to explore the research literature with the keywords: vitamin D; older adults; preferences; knowledge; practices; beliefs. 22 recent studies were identified; although the majority of older people knew of vitD, knowledge about increased fall risk secondary to deficiency was limited and knowledge did not always correlate with adequate intake or status. There was evidence of confusion regarding vitD food sources, sun-exposure and health benefits, and although General Practitioners were trusted information sources they often did not discuss vitD with patients. Preferences varied significantly depending on geographic location, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education and cultural factors; overall, older people wanted more clear information about vitD. In conclusion, older people have a relatively high awareness of vitD, however, knowledge may be inaccurate and low in those most at risk, and knowledge of deficiency-associated fall risk is under-recognised. Furthermore, studies specifically addressing older adult preferences are lacking; an understanding of preferences, integrated into public health guidelines and implementation strategies, is key not only to decreasing the risk of vitamin D deficiency but also to enabling autonomy in older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing, A Multidisciplinary Perspective)
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