Special Issue "The November 23rd, 1980 Irpinia-Lucania, Southern Italy Earthquake: Insights and Reviews 40 Years Later"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sabina Porfido
Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Food Sciences (ISA) Via Roma, 64-83100 Avellino, Italy
Interests: natural hazards; active tectonics; historical and recent seismicity; seismic risk; seismic hazard; environment; paleoseismology; floods; historical floods; disasters induced by earthquakes; cultural heritage; resilience
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Giuliana Alessio
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Sezione di Napoli, Osservatorio Vesuviano Italy Naples, Italy
Interests: seismotectonics; earthquake geology; natural hazard; geoheritage
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Germana Gaudiosi
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Sezione di Napoli, Osservatorio Vesuviano Italy Naples, Italy
Interests: tectonics; structural geology; geology; exploration geophysics; plate tectonics; seismics; quaternary geology; geodynamics; geophysics; applied geophysics; seismology; earthquake
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Rosa Nappi
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Sezione di Napoli, Osservatorio Vesuviano Italy Naples, Italy
Interests: seismotectonics; earthquake geology and paleoseismology; seismic hazard; tectonic geomorphology; active tectonics; historical and recent seismicity; geological mapping; volcanic geomorphology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Alessandro Maria Michetti
Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como, Italy
Interests: structural geology; quaternary geology; paleoseismology; active tectonics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The November 23rd, 1980 Irpinia-Lucania, Southern Italy earthquake: insights and reviews 40 years later.

Soon, 40 years will have passed since the earthquake that struck Irpinia-Lucania (Southern Italy) on 23 November 1980 (MS 6,9 I Max X MCS).

This earthquake, besides being remembered as the most devastating seismic event in Italy in terms of loss of human life and destruction of cultural heritage in the last 100 years, is still considered to be a key event for the study of seismicity in Italy, marking the development of modern seismology, quaternary geology, and active tectonic studies, including the growth of the emerging methodology of paleoseismology in Italy. In this Special Issue, we want to collect key contributions that will help the scientific community to update the results obtained from the study of this earthquake after 40 years. In fact, the time has come to reconsider the many, still open, fundamental research issues so richly illustrated during the Irpinia-Lucania event.

Our goal is to gather several contributions from researchers with different expertise, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach that highlights the most important aspects of the earthquake from a seismological and geological point of view, without neglecting the reconstruction of cultural heritage, the resilience of the population, and the socioeconomic development of the internal areas of the Southern Apennines after the earthquake. No doubt, lessons learned from the Irpinia-Lucania event are relevant at the local level, for the whole Mediterranean region, and in similar seismotectonic and cultural environments around the world.

Dr. Sabina Porfido
Dr. Giuliana Alessio
Dr. Germana Gaudiosi
Dr. Rosa Nappi
Prof. Alessandro Maria Michetti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 1980 post-earthquake emergency phase—the response of the scientific community
  • Focal parameters of the 1980 earthquake
  • Macroseismic studies: a historical and modern perspective
  • Primary and secondary environmental effects induced by the 1980 earthquake
  • Cultural heritage, damage, and reconstruction of small towns and cities
  • Geology, active tectonics, and paleoseismology of the areas affected by the 1980 earthquake
  • New perspective on seismic hazard evaluation

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Geology of the Epicentral Area of the November 23, 1980 Earthquake (Irpinia, Italy): New Stratigraphical, Structural and Petrological Constrains
Geosciences 2020, 10(6), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10060247 - 25 Jun 2020
Abstract
The geology of the epicentral area of the 1980 earthquake (Irpinia-Lucania, Italy) is described with new stratigraphic, petrographic and structural data. Subsurface geological data have been collected during the studies for the excavation works of the Pavoncelli bis hydraulic tunnel, developing between Caposele [...] Read more.
The geology of the epicentral area of the 1980 earthquake (Irpinia-Lucania, Italy) is described with new stratigraphic, petrographic and structural data. Subsurface geological data have been collected during the studies for the excavation works of the Pavoncelli bis hydraulic tunnel, developing between Caposele and Conza della Campania in an area that was highly damaged during 1980 earthquake. Our approach includes geological, stratigraphic, structural studies, and petrological analyses of rock samples collected along the tunnel profile and in outcropping sections. Stratigraphic studies and detailed geological and structural mapping were carried out in about 200 km2 wide area. The main units cropping out have been studied and correlated in order to document the effects of tectonic changes during the orogenic evolution on the foreland basin systems and the sandstone detrital modes in this sector of the southern Apennines. The multi-disciplinary and updated datasets have allowed getting new insights on the tectono-stratigraphic evolution and stratigraphic architecture of the southern Apennines foreland basin system and on the structural and stratigraphic relations of Apennines tectonic units and timing of their kinematic evolution. They also allowed to better understand the relationships between internal and external basin units within the Apennine thrust belt and its tectonic evolution. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Role of the Water Level in the Assessment of Seismic Vulnerability for the 23 November 1980 Irpinia–Basilicata Earthquake
Geosciences 2020, 10(6), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10060229 - 13 Jun 2020
Abstract
The seismic vulnerability of structures is closely related to changes in the degree of soil saturation that may cause significant changes in volume and shear strength, and consequently, bearing capacity. This paper aims to consider this issue during the strong earthquake that struck [...] Read more.
The seismic vulnerability of structures is closely related to changes in the degree of soil saturation that may cause significant changes in volume and shear strength, and consequently, bearing capacity. This paper aims to consider this issue during the strong earthquake that struck Southern Italy on 23 November 1980 (Ms = 6.9) and affected the Campania and Basilicata regions. Several 3D numerical finite element models were performed in order to consider the effects of soil–structure interaction (SSI) on a representative benchmark structure. In particular, the role of the water level depth is herein considered as one of the most significant parameters to control the shear deformations inside the soil, and thus the performance of the superstructure. Results show the importance of considering the water level for buildings on shallow foundations in terms of settlements, base shear forces and floor displacements. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Near-Real-Time Loss Estimates for Future Italian Earthquakes Based on the M6.9 Irpinia Example
Geosciences 2020, 10(5), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10050165 - 03 May 2020
Abstract
The number of fatalities and injured was calculated, using the computer code QLARM and its data set and assuming information about the Irpinia 1980 earthquake became available in near-real-time. The casualties calculated for a point source, an approximate line source and a well-defined [...] Read more.
The number of fatalities and injured was calculated, using the computer code QLARM and its data set and assuming information about the Irpinia 1980 earthquake became available in near-real-time. The casualties calculated for a point source, an approximate line source and a well-defined line source would have become available about 30 min, 60 min and years after the main shock, respectively. The first estimate would have been satisfactory, indicating the seriousness of the disaster. The subsequent loss estimate after 60 min would have defined the human losses accurately, and the ultimate estimate was most accurate. In 2009, QLARM issued a correct estimate of the number of fatalities within 22 min of the M6.3 L’Aquila main shock. These two results show that the number of casualties and injuries in large and major earthquakes in Italy can be estimated correctly within less than an hour by using QLARM. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Soil–Structure Interaction Assessment of the 23 November 1980 Irpinia-Basilicata Earthquake
Geosciences 2020, 10(4), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10040152 - 22 Apr 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
This paper aimed to present a systematic study of the effects caused by the strong earthquake that struck southern Italy on 23 November 1980 (Ms = 6.9) and affected the Campania and Basilicata regions. Two aspects are discussed here: The broadening of the [...] Read more.
This paper aimed to present a systematic study of the effects caused by the strong earthquake that struck southern Italy on 23 November 1980 (Ms = 6.9) and affected the Campania and Basilicata regions. Two aspects are discussed here: The broadening of the knowledge of the response site effects by considering several soil free-field conditions and the assessment of the role of the soil–structure interaction (SSI) on a representative benchmark structure. This research study, based on the state-of-the-art knowledge, may be applied to assess future seismic events and to propose new original code provisions. The numerical simulations were herein performed with the advanced platform OpenSees, which can consider non-linear models for both the structure and the soil. The results show the importance of considering the SSI in the seismic assessment of soil amplifications and its consequences on the structural performance. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop