Gels in Medicine and Pharmacological Therapies (2nd Edition)

A special issue of Gels (ISSN 2310-2861). This special issue belongs to the section "Gel Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 January 2025 | Viewed by 5791

Special Issue Editors

School of Dentistry, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia
Interests: nanoparticles; surface modification; drug delivery; tissue engineering; bone regeneration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
Interests: nanoparticles; surface modification; drug delivery; tissue engineering; bone regeneration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
Interests: tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; biomaterials; immunomodulaiton; nanotechnology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to participate in the 2nd edition of Special Issue entitled “Gels in Medicine and Pharmacological Therapies” in Gels. Recent advances in biomedical engineering suggest that gels (e.g., hydrogels, polymer gels, etc.) are potential candidates for translational use in clinical treatment, due to features such as biocompatibility, water absorbance and, especially, the structural similarity to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which make this type of material ideal for tissue engineering applications, providing a porous ECM-mimicking 3D scaffold for cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Meanwhile, gels are considered ideal delivery tools, being harnessed to deliver small-molecular drugs, macromolecular cytokines/growth factors, or nanosized drug-loading vehicles. Utilizing the biodegradability of gels, the loaded pharmacological contents can be released in a controlled manner, therefore facilitating the therapeutic effects. Despite the poor mechanical property of traditional gels, recent advances suggest that gels can be modified with engineering approaches to significantly improve the mechanical strength to fit with the applications of hard tissue regeneration. The multifunctional features of gels suggest their biomedical applications can be further explored. This Special Issue aims to highlight the current and future development of gels and gel-associated biomaterials with translational potential in medicine and pharmacological therapies. Given your expertise on the theme and related disciplines, we would like to invite you and your colleagues to contribute to this Special Issue. The submission of original research or reviews (mini-reviews excluded) is welcome.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Kindly regards,

Dr. Chun Xu
Dr. Wendong Gao
Dr. Lan Xiao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gels is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gels
  • manufacturing
  • drug delivery
  • regenerative medicine

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 2136 KiB  
Article
Thermosensitive In Situ Gelling Poloxamers/Hyaluronic Acid Gels for Hydrocortisone Ocular Delivery
by Fabrizio Villapiano, Teresa Silvestri, Camilla Lo Gatto, Danilo Aleo, Virginia Campani, Sossio Fabio Graziano, Concetta Giancola, Federica D’Aria, Giuseppe De Rosa, Marco Biondi and Laura Mayol
Gels 2024, 10(3), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels10030193 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 824
Abstract
This study endeavored to overcome the physiological barriers hindering optimal bioavailability in ophthalmic therapeutics by devising drug delivery platforms that allow therapeutically effective drug concentrations in ocular tissues for prolonged times. Thermosensitive drug delivery platforms were formulated by blending poloxamers (F68 and F127) [...] Read more.
This study endeavored to overcome the physiological barriers hindering optimal bioavailability in ophthalmic therapeutics by devising drug delivery platforms that allow therapeutically effective drug concentrations in ocular tissues for prolonged times. Thermosensitive drug delivery platforms were formulated by blending poloxamers (F68 and F127) with low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (HA) in various concentrations and loaded with hydrocortisone (HC). Among the formulations examined, only three were deemed suitable based on their desirable gelling properties at a temperature close to the eye’s surface conditions while also ensuring minimal gelation time for swift ocular application. Rheological analyses unveiled the ability of the formulations to develop gels at suitable temperatures, elucidating the gel-like characteristics around the physiological temperature essential for sustained drug release. The differential scanning calorimetry findings elucidated intricate hydrogel–water interactions, indicating that HA affects the water–polymer interactions within the gel by increasing the platform hydrophilicity. Also, in vitro drug release studies demonstrated significant hydrocortisone release within 8 h, governed by an anomalous transport mechanism, prompting further investigation for optimized release kinetics. The produced platforms offer promising prospects for efficacious ocular drug delivery, addressing pivotal challenges in ocular therapeutics and heralding future advancements in the domain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gels in Medicine and Pharmacological Therapies (2nd Edition))
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21 pages, 4180 KiB  
Article
Topical Delivery of Terbinafine HCL Using Nanogels: A New Approach to Superficial Fungal Infection Treatment
by Shams ul Hassan, Ikrima Khalid, Liaqat Hussain, Mohammad T. Imam and Imran Shahid
Gels 2023, 9(11), 841; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9110841 - 24 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1564
Abstract
This study investigated pH-responsive Terbinafine HCL (TBH)-loaded nanogels as a new approach to treating superficial fungal infections. Acrylic acid (AA) is a synthetic monomer that was crosslinked with a natural polymer (gelatin) using a free radical polymerization technique to fabricate gelatin-g-poly-(acrylic acid) nanogels. [...] Read more.
This study investigated pH-responsive Terbinafine HCL (TBH)-loaded nanogels as a new approach to treating superficial fungal infections. Acrylic acid (AA) is a synthetic monomer that was crosslinked with a natural polymer (gelatin) using a free radical polymerization technique to fabricate gelatin-g-poly-(acrylic acid) nanogels. Ammonium persulphate (APS) and N, N′-methylene bisacrylamide (MBA) were used as the initiator and crosslinker, respectively. Developed gelatin-g-poly-(acrylic acid) nanogels were evaluated for the swelling study (pH 1.2, 5, 7.4), DEE, particle size, FTIR, thermal stability (TGA, DSC), XRD, SEM, DEE, and in vitro drug release study to obtain optimized nanogels. Optimized nanogels were incorporated into 1% HPMC gel and then evaluated in comparison with Lamisil cream 1% for TBH stratum corneum retention, skin irritation, and in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity studies. Optimized nanogels (AAG 7) demonstrated a 255 nm particle size, 82.37% DEE, pH-dependent swelling, 92.15% of drug release (pH) 7.4 within 12 h, and a larger zone of inhibition compared to Lamisil cream. HPMC-loaded nanogels significantly improved the TBH skin retention percentage, as revealed by an ex vivo skin retention study, indicating the usefulness of nanogels for topical use. In vivo studies conducted on animal models infected with a fungal infection have further confirmed the effectiveness of nanogels compared with the Lamisil cream. Hence, Gelatin-g-poly-(acrylic acid) nanogels carrying poorly soluble TBH can be a promising approach for treating superficial fungal infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gels in Medicine and Pharmacological Therapies (2nd Edition))
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20 pages, 5110 KiB  
Article
QbD Design, Formulation, Optimization and Evaluation of Trans-Tympanic Reverse Gelatination Gel of Norfloxacin: Investigating Gene-Gene Interactions to Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy
by Amit Budhori, Abhishek Tiwari, Varsha Tiwari, Ajay Sharma, Manish Kumar, Girendra Gautam, Tarun Virmani, Girish Kumar, Abdulsalam Alhalmi, Omar Mohammed Noman, Sidgi Hasson and Ramzi A. Mothana
Gels 2023, 9(8), 657; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9080657 - 15 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1117
Abstract
Traditional otic drug delivery methods lack controlled release capabilities, making reverse gelatination gels a promising alternative. Reverse gelatination gels are colloidal systems that transition from a sol to a gel phase at the target site, providing controlled drug release over an extended period. [...] Read more.
Traditional otic drug delivery methods lack controlled release capabilities, making reverse gelatination gels a promising alternative. Reverse gelatination gels are colloidal systems that transition from a sol to a gel phase at the target site, providing controlled drug release over an extended period. Thermosensitive norfloxacin reverse gelatination gels were developed using a Quality by Design (QbD)-based optimization approach. The formulations were evaluated for their in vitro release profile, rheological behavior, visual appearance, pH, gelling time, and sol–gel transition temperature. The results show that the gelation temperatures of the formulations ranged from 33 to 37 °C, with gelling durations between 35 and 90 s. The drug content in the formulations was uniform, with entrapment efficiency ranging from 55% to 95%. Among the formulations, F10 exhibited the most favorable properties and was selected for a stability study lasting 60 days. Ex-vivo release data demonstrate that the F10 formulation achieved 95.6percentage of drug release at 360 min. This study successfully developed thermosensitive norfloxacin reverse gelatination gels using a QbD-based optimization approach. The selected formulation, F10, exhibited desirable properties in terms of gelling temperature, drug content, and release profile. These gels hold potential for the controlled delivery of norfloxacin in the treatment of ear infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gels in Medicine and Pharmacological Therapies (2nd Edition))
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Review

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40 pages, 3698 KiB  
Review
Single-, Dual-, and Multi-Stimuli-Responsive Nanogels for Biomedical Applications
by Naveen Kumar, Sauraj Singh, Piyush Sharma, Bijender Kumar and Anuj Kumar
Gels 2024, 10(1), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels10010061 - 14 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1989
Abstract
In recent years, stimuli-responsive nanogels that can undergo suitable transitions under endogenous (e.g., pH, enzymes and reduction) or exogenous stimuli (e.g., temperature, light, and magnetic fields) for on-demand drug delivery, have received significant interest in biomedical fields, including drug delivery, tissue engineering, wound [...] Read more.
In recent years, stimuli-responsive nanogels that can undergo suitable transitions under endogenous (e.g., pH, enzymes and reduction) or exogenous stimuli (e.g., temperature, light, and magnetic fields) for on-demand drug delivery, have received significant interest in biomedical fields, including drug delivery, tissue engineering, wound healing, and gene therapy due to their unique environment-sensitive properties. Furthermore, these nanogels have become very popular due to some of their special properties such as good hydrophilicity, high drug loading efficiency, flexibility, and excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this article, the authors discuss current developments in the synthesis, properties, and biomedical applications of stimulus-responsive nanogels. In addition, the opportunities and challenges of nanogels for biomedical applications are also briefly predicted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gels in Medicine and Pharmacological Therapies (2nd Edition))
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