Special Issue "Smart Cities, Innovation, and Multi-Dimensionality"

A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart System Infrastructure and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Theresa A. Pardo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Technology in Government & Department of Public Administration and Policy, Rockefeller College, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY12205, USA
Interests: public service transformation; digital government; smart cities; smart governance; information sharing and integration; new and emerging technologies; data strategy and management; leadership and technology enablement
Dr. J. Ramon Gil-Garcia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Technology in Government & Department of Public Administration and Policy, Rockefeller College, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY12205, USA
Interests: collaborative digital government; inter-organizational information integration; smart cities and smart governments; adoption and implementation of emergent technologies; digital divide policies; multimethod research approaches

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In spite of global recognition of the need for, and increasing investments in, making cities smarter, we continue to see a lack of clarity and consensus around what defines a smart city. Some labels are very familiar, representing the “smart city” and related phenomena—among them, digital city, urban innovation, intelligent city, creative city, knowledge city, and information city, to mention a few. Recently, we have also begun to see new labels, such as “living city” and “innovation city”, emerge. Whether old or new, some labels draw attention to the technological aspects, while others to the development of human capital or physical infrastructure, among other aspects. For a number of years, scholars and practitioners have recognized that smart cities are not built simply through harnessing the potential of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Nam and Pardo (2014)[1], for example, argue that technology needs to be understood as a means to enable social, environmental, economic, and cultural progress in cities. Hollands (2008)[2] also calls for a conceptualization of the idea of a “smart city” to include most of the important aspects, beyond technology, and all their conceptual amplitude. These scholars, and others, call for a more comprehensive view—a view that is not label-based but derived from a deep understanding of how cities and communities are creating value through context-specific innovations in policy, management, technology, and governance.

Scholars and practitioners need a better understanding of the contemporary array of phenomena now being referred to as “smartness” in cities and other communities. To understand such contemporary phenomena in terms of innovation through “smarter” technologies, through smarter uses of technology, and through smarter decisions based on new technologies and the uses we make of them, we must take a multidimensional view of innovation and change. Such a multidimensional view affords researchers and practitioners the opportunity to consider dimensions such as technology, policy, management, and, increasingly, governance and enables critical considerations of the interdependencies of those dimensions and the impact of their interdependencies on the efforts of cities and other communities to become smarter. In fact, recent research argues that it is very important to identify the main components of smartness and that they include technology and data, but also other important aspects related to the physical environment, the society as a whole, and the government settings (Gil-Garcia, Pardo, and Nam, 2015).[3]

This Special Issue of Future Internet, “Smart Cities, Innovation, and Multidimensionality”, invites original, novel, and high-quality papers that advance our current understanding of the multidimensional nature of smart cities and the role of innovation in efforts to make cities smarter. It takes a comprehensive perspective and attempts to bridge the gap between sound research and practice expertise in the area of smarter cities and innovation in policy, management, technology, and data aspects. We welcome manuscripts encompassing conceptual approaches, theoretical frameworks, empirical research, and case studies of cities from all around the globe.

The Special Issue focuses on topics that include but are not limited to:

  • Multidimensional frameworks to understand smart cities;
  • Theories and analytical frameworks to study smart cities;
  • Fundamental concepts underlying smart city initiatives;
  • Rigorous empirical studies about smart cities;
  • Case studies of smart city initiatives;
  • Emergent technologies and their implications for smart cities;
  • Research-based practical recommendations for making cities smarter;
  • Evaluation tools and strategies for smart cities initiatives;
  • Public value assessment models for smart city initiatives;
  • Governance models for smart cities;
  • Managerial implications of smart city initiatives;
  • Implementation of smart city initiatives.

[1] Nam, T. & Pardo, T.A. (2014). The changing face of a city government: A case study of Philly311. Government Information Quarterly, 31 (S1): S1-S9.

[2] Hollands, R. G. (2008). Will the real smart city please stand up? Intelligent, progressive or entrepreneurial. City, 12 (3), 303–320.

[3] Gil-Garcia, J. Ramon, Theresa A. Pardo and Taewoo Nam. (2015). What Makes a City Smart? Identifying Core Components and Proposing an Integrative and Comprehensive Conceptualization. Information Polity, 20 (1): 61–87.

Dr. Theresa A. Pardo
Dr. J. Ramon Gil-Garcia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • smart city
  • smart community
  • innovation
  • urban context
  • emergent technologies
  • multidimensionality
  • smart city initiative

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
An Architecture for Biometric Electronic Identification Document System Based on Blockchain
Future Internet 2020, 12(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi12010010 - 11 Jan 2020
Abstract
This paper proposes an architecture for biometric electronic identification document (e-ID) system based on Blockchain for citizens identity verification in transactions corresponding to the notary, registration, tax declaration and payment, basic health services and registration of economic activities, among others. To validate the [...] Read more.
This paper proposes an architecture for biometric electronic identification document (e-ID) system based on Blockchain for citizens identity verification in transactions corresponding to the notary, registration, tax declaration and payment, basic health services and registration of economic activities, among others. To validate the user authentication, a biometric e-ID system is used to avoid spoofing and related attacks. Also, to validate the document a digital certificate is used with the corresponding public and private key for each citizen by using a user’s PIN. The proposed transaction validation process was implemented on a Blockchain system in order to record and verify the transactions made by all citizens registered in the electoral census, which guarantees security, integrity, scalability, traceability, and no-ambiguity. Additionally, a Blockchain network architecture is presented in a distributed and decentralized way including all the nodes of the network, database and government entities such as national register and notary offices. The results of the application of a new consensus algorithm to our Blockchain network are also presented showing mining time, memory and CPU usage when the number of transactions scales up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities, Innovation, and Multi-Dimensionality)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop