Special Issue "Network Economics and Utility Maximization"

A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903). This special issue belongs to the section "Network Virtualization and Edge/Fog Computing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Eirini Eleni Tsiropoulou
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
Interests: heterogeneous wireless networks; game theory; reinforcement learning; artificial intelligence; network economics; 5G networks; cyber-physical systems; Internet of Things
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Symeon Papavassiliou
Website
Guest Editor
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Athens, 15780, Greece
Interests: complex networks; wireless systems; ad hoc and sensor networks; software-defined radios and software-defined networks; online social networks; network modeling and optimization; network economics; cyber physical systems; Internet of Things; future internet research experimentation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rise of 5G communications and the evolution of the Internet of Things era, mobile communications and computing solutions are tightly coupled and jointly studied with economic considerations. Any technology choice, wireless protocol selection, network architecture proposal, and virtualization approach should be made based on the understanding of the economic implications and the potential costs and benefits, both from the provider and the end-user perspective. Various network economics-based solutions have been identified in the literature and have already been applied in real-communication networking scenarios, as well as other interdependent systems. Usage-based pricing, inventive mechanisms, auction mechanisms, smart data pricing, and service providers’ reputation and trust models are only some indicative examples. The utmost goals of the network economics mechanisms are to improve resource management and decision-making processes, provide better services to the end-users via exploiting the available system resources, improve the fairness among the end-users, support the free-market operation among the service providers, enhance the available bandwidth usage, and provide energy-efficient solutions.

The concept of network economics is also tightly coupled with the Network Utility Maximization (NUM) theory, which aims to improve the end-users’ and the providers’ benefits from co-existing in the network by maximizing their perceived utility. Centralized methods have been identified as potential solutions, based on optimization techniques (convex and non-convex optimization), where the decision-making process lies on a centralized entity that has the global view of the network, such as software-defined networking (SDN). Decentralized methods have also been proposed based on game theory, reinforcement learning, and deep learning approaches, allowing the end-users to make optimal decisions about their strategies in the network based on limited information exchange.

Traffic on the Internet and wireless networks is continuously rising, with multimedia data being the dominant source. The explosive growth of ultra-high definition video services and bandwidth-expensive applications, create interesting challenges in content delivery networks (CDN), and storage/cloud costs. In this setting, the emerging tradeoffs between the quality of experience (QoE) and associated costs, for network, internet service, and cloud computing providers, motivate economic resource utilization approaches, and revenue management for all involved actors and players.

This Special Issue aims to present the advances in the research on network economics and utility maximization. We seek submissions that demonstrate how network economics and utility maximization can solve current problems in 5G networks and beyond, as well as challenges that arise in the Internet of Things era and emerging variations of the cloud computing paradigm. Topics of interest are any aspects of network economics and utility maximization, including but not limited to the following:

  • Energy-efficient networks and services
  • Foundations for economic multimedia communication
  • Network slicing design and optimization in 5G networks
  • Economic modeling of multimedia transmission over heterogeneous networks
  • Software-defined networking (SDN) architectures and networks
  • Software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV)
  • Future of IoT networks and cloud computing
  • Network economics for safe and smart cities
  • Network economics for content distribution networks (CDNs)
  • Metrics and models for quality of experience (QoE)
  • Smart data pricing
  • Quality of service in wireless and mobile networks
  • Cognitive network architectures
  • Smart grids communications and demand response techniques
  • Machine-learning and artificial intelligence for traffic/QoE management
  • Advanced content caching and dissemination techniques
  • Blockchain-based decentralization schemes for IoT
  • Mobile edge and fog computing systems
  • Vehicular cloud networks
  • Security, reliability, and trust in networks
  • Crowdsensing and crowdsourcing systems
  • Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data applications
  • IoT platforms, integration, and services
  • Cyber-physical systems interacting with 5G networks and IoT

Dr. Eirini Eleni Tsiropoulou
Prof. Dr. Symeon Papavassiliou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Network economics
  • Network utility maximization
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
  • 5G communications
  • Multimedia communications
  • Software-defined networks (SDN)
  • Quality of experience
  • Smart cities
  • Mobile edge computing
  • Cyber-physical systems
  • Game theory
  • Blockchain
  • Tactile internet
  • Reinforcement learning

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Validating the Adoption of Heterogeneous Internet of Things with Blockchain
Future Internet 2020, 12(6), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi12060107 - 21 Jun 2020
Abstract
Emerging technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT) and blockchain have affected the digital transformation. Blockchain, on the one hand, was initially developed for the purpose of financial trading due to its robustness especially for fault tolerance and cryptographic security in addition to [...] Read more.
Emerging technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT) and blockchain have affected the digital transformation. Blockchain, on the one hand, was initially developed for the purpose of financial trading due to its robustness especially for fault tolerance and cryptographic security in addition to its decentralized architecture. IoT, on the other hand, is an open interconnected network of smart devices able to communicate simultaneously. This arises a challenge in privacy and security, specifically for the data being exchanged. To overcome this, studies have focused on the blockchain to resolve the security and privacy issues of IoT. Indeed, limited studies have proposed to assess blockchain’s viability for IoT and the associated challenges. In this paper, a conceptual model has proposed to identify the crucial factors affecting the adoption of blockchain in IoT. The model consists of four dimensions of factors that we assume will affect the adoption of the two technologies. The dimensions are: attitude-related factors, social influence related factors, data-related factors, and security-related factors. This model is validated through a survey that was distributed between professionals in blockchain and IoT. The findings show a significant impact of data-related factors on the adoption of blockchain in IoT and the intention to use them. The model can play an important role in the development of strategies, standards, and performance assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network Economics and Utility Maximization)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Research on Factors Affecting Solvers’ Participation Time in Online Crowdsourcing Contests
Future Internet 2019, 11(8), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi11080176 - 12 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A crowdsourcing contest is one of the most popular modes of crowdsourcing and is also an important tool for an enterprise to implement open innovation. The solvers’ active participation is one of the major reasons for the success of crowdsourcing contests. Research on [...] Read more.
A crowdsourcing contest is one of the most popular modes of crowdsourcing and is also an important tool for an enterprise to implement open innovation. The solvers’ active participation is one of the major reasons for the success of crowdsourcing contests. Research on solvers’ participation behavior is helpful in understanding the sustainability and incentives of solvers’ participation in the online crowdsourcing platform. So, how to attract more solvers to participate and put in more effort is the focus of researchers. In this regard, previous studies mainly used the submission quantity to measure solvers’ participation behavior and lacked an effective measure on the degree of participation effort expended by a solver. For the first time, we use solvers’ participation time as a dependent variable to measure their effort in a crowdsourcing contest. Thus, we incorporate participation time into the solver’s participation research. With the data from Taskcn.com, we analyze how participation time is affected four key factors including task design, task description, task process, and environment, respectively. We found that, first, for task design, higher task rewards will attract solvers to invest more time in the participation process and the relationship between participation time and task duration is inverted U-shaped. Second, for task description, the length of the task description has a negative impact on participation time and the task description attachment will positively influence the participation time. Third, for the task process, communication and supplementary explanations in a crowdsourcing process positively affect participation time. Fourth, for environmental factors, the task density of the crowdsourcing platform and the market price of all crowdsourcing contests have respectively negative and positive effects on participation time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network Economics and Utility Maximization)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop