Special Issue "Education Responses to Technological Challenges and Their Impact on Classrooms"

A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903). This special issue belongs to the section "Techno-Social Smart Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Antonio José Moreno Guerrero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Didactics and School Organization, University of Granada, 51001 Ceuta, Spain
Interests: didactics; teaching and learning; ICT; E-learning; school organization; educational supervision
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. José Antonio Marín-Marín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Didactics and School Organization, University of Granada, 18010 Granada, Spain
Interests: educational guidance; teacher training; social education; educational technology; sustainability education; educational innovation; active methodologies; gamification; digital skills
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Santiago Alonso-García
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Didactics and School Organization, University of Granada, 18010, Granada, Spain
Interests: teacher training; early childhood education; educational technology; sustainability education; social networks; educational innovation; active methodologies.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Fernando José Sadio Ramos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education, Polytechnic of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: teacher training; curriculum development; ethics and citizenship; sociocultural animation; educational deontology; human rights and citizenship education; bio-narrative research; curricular sustainability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The information and communication technologies (hereinafter ICT) have acquired a relevant value in today’s society, as well as in education as a field of study, where they have assumed a great role and enabled progress in the teaching and learning processes. Two of its most potential characteristics are ubiquity (i.e., making use of it in any space and time), and ergonomics (i.e., its adaptability to the different peculiarities of the training action). All this is mainly due to the Internet and technological devices.

The inclusion of ICT in learning spaces has led to new interactions between students, not only with their peers, teachers, content, and conventional teaching materials, but also with mobile technology. This technology offers great stimulation, providing on-screen information that is enriched and can be manipulated. This facilitates an improvement in academic indicators such as student motivation, interest, and participation.

We welcome the submissions covering topics related to:

  • Educational technological resources;
  • Information and communication technologies;
  • Innovative methodologies;
  • Integration of ICT in the classroom;
  • ICTs as a means of promoting student inclusion;
  • Educational software;
  • Educational experiences with technological resources;
  • Research on the implementation of ICT in the classroom;
  • Mobile learning;
  • Big Data in education;
  • Virtual learning environments;
  • Augmented and virtual reality in education;
  • Impact of COVID-19 on teaching and learning;
  • Online teaching resources;
  • Internet and social network addiction;
  • Cyberbullying;
  • Sexting.

Dr. Antonio José Moreno Guerrero
Dr. José Antonio Marín-Marín
Dr. Santiago Alonso-García
Dr. Fernando José Sadio Ramos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • education
  • methodologies
  • internet
  • technological resources
  • information and communication technologies ICT
  • educational challenges
  • Big Data
  • educational innovation
  • mobile learning

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
The Impact of Quality of Experience of Chinese College Students on Internet-Based Resources English Learning
Future Internet 2021, 13(7), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi13070162 - 22 Jun 2021
Viewed by 137
Abstract
Since Internet-based resources provides various and practical forms of English learning materials, Internet-based resources English learning is a common way for the younger generation. However, not like adult learning, university students need stronger motivation to learn English from Internet-based resources. This study surveyed [...] Read more.
Since Internet-based resources provides various and practical forms of English learning materials, Internet-based resources English learning is a common way for the younger generation. However, not like adult learning, university students need stronger motivation to learn English from Internet-based resources. This study surveyed Chinese college students in Central China to reveal the relationship between cultural intelligence, hedonic motivation, English self-efficacy, online experience quality, and willingness to continue learning online English. Using online media platforms and convenient sampling methods, a total of 385 questionnaires were collected. The data analysis was divided into three phases, descriptive analysis, measurement model evaluation, and structural equation model examination. The results showed Internet quality of experience significantly impacted English continuous learning intention. Cultural intelligence, English self-efficacy, and hedonic motivation all influenced significantly on Internet quality of experience and hedonic motivation had the strongest impact. In addition, the mediation effects of Internet quality of experience to these three factors and Internet-based resources English continuous learning intention all existed. Finally, the research results show cultural intelligence, English self-efficacy, and hedonic motivation were all examined significantly impacting Internet quality of experience statistically. English learning hedonic motivation is the most influencing factor. Therefore, English learning material should be attractive, fun, and enjoyable. This is what the teachers should think of and emphasize when to recommend learning material for students. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Teaching Physics for Computer Science Students in Higher Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Fully Internet-Supported Course
Future Internet 2021, 13(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi13020035 - 29 Jan 2021
Viewed by 936
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has modified and diversified the ways that students receive education. During confinements, complex courses integrating previous knowledge must be carefully designed and implemented to effectively replace the elements present in face-to-face learning to improve the students’ experience. This work assesses [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has modified and diversified the ways that students receive education. During confinements, complex courses integrating previous knowledge must be carefully designed and implemented to effectively replace the elements present in face-to-face learning to improve the students’ experience. This work assesses the implementation of a digital-learning physics course for computer science students in a skill-based education program in higher education. The assessment was useful for the institution to evaluate if the digital strategy implemented in the course fulfilled the original premises and objectives. The analyses performed provide useful knowledge of theoretical and operational actions applied in this methodology that could be adapted to similar courses for the younger generations in this university. COVID-19 confinement will continue in Mexico in 2021. This assessment resulted in a positive evaluation of the digital strategy being followed, which can be continued while the contingency lasts. Three teachers came together to design math, physics, and computational sciences content for various sections of a physics course. The analysis was developed and implemented according to an institutional digital delivery model for the COVID-19 pandemic. Elements related to attendance, digital access, performance distribution by gender, activity types, and the course learning sections were considered. The analysis was performed with some techniques found in the literature for small groups, complemented when necessary by standard statistical tests to discern meaningful trends. A primary goal was to assess skill-based learning in the course delivered digitally due to the COVID-19 confinement. Furthermore, additional issues concerning the learning dynamics were searched, reported, and analyzed. Finally, the outcomes of an institutional exit survey collecting students’ opinions supported certain observed behaviors. The analysis produced meaningful evidence that the course’s skill-based development was well supported by the digital delivery during the confinement. Furthermore, differences in the students’ performances in the various course content sections proved statistically significant and are discussed in this work. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Learning to Learn Competence in Early Childhood Preservice Teachers: An Outdoor and e/m-Learning Experience in the Museum
Future Internet 2021, 13(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi13020025 - 23 Jan 2021
Viewed by 906
Abstract
This study was developed with Early Childhood Preservice Teachers within the framework of the Teaching and Learning of Social Sciences over three academic years (2017–2018, 2018–2019, and 2019–2020) at the University of Alcalá. The main objective was to improve the learning to learn [...] Read more.
This study was developed with Early Childhood Preservice Teachers within the framework of the Teaching and Learning of Social Sciences over three academic years (2017–2018, 2018–2019, and 2019–2020) at the University of Alcalá. The main objective was to improve the learning to learn competence during teacher training from an outdoor experience at the Museum of Guadalajara (Spain), using e/m-learning tools (Blackboard Learn, Google Forms, QR codes, and websites) and the inquiry-based learning approach. To ascertain the level of acquisition of this competence in those teachers who were being trained, their self-perception—before and after—of the outdoor experience was assessed through a system of categories adapted from the European Commission. The results show a certain improvement in this competence in Early Childhood Preservice Teachers. Additionally, this outdoor experience shows the insufficient educational adaptation of the museum to the early childhood education stage from a social sciences point of view. Finally, we highlight the importance of carrying out outdoor experiences from an inquiry-based education approach. These outdoor experiences should be carried out in places like museums to encourage contextualized and experiential learning of the youngest in formal education. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Cyberbullying Analysis in Intercultural Educational Environments Using Binary Logistic Regressions
Future Internet 2021, 13(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi13010015 - 09 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1265
Abstract
The goal of this study is to analyze how religion, ethnic group, and race influence the likelihood of becoming either a cybervictim or cyberbully in intercultural educational environments. In the research, 755 students in secondary education were analyzed in the south of Spain [...] Read more.
The goal of this study is to analyze how religion, ethnic group, and race influence the likelihood of becoming either a cybervictim or cyberbully in intercultural educational environments. In the research, 755 students in secondary education were analyzed in the south of Spain through the Cyberbullying Scale for students with Cultural and Religious Diversity (CSCRD). The analyses were carried out using the Statistical Package SPSS and the STATA software. The results obtained from the Kruskal–Wallis H test showed significant differences according to these aspects, for both the cybervictim and cyberbully parameters. The results stemming from binary logistic regressions confirmed such differences and regarded those students who belong to the Muslim religion, the gypsy ethnic group and the Asian race as being more likely to become cybervictims. Furthermore, these analyses showed that Gypsy and Asian students were also more likely to be cyberbullies than other groups. The main conclusions state that minority groups are more likely to suffer cyberbullying in intercultural educational environments, and that students from these groups are also more likely to become cyberbullies. Full article
Article
Evaluation of Digital Piracy by Youths
Future Internet 2021, 13(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi13010011 - 04 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1523
Abstract
This paper sets out to explain how adolescents interpret piracy. Digital piracy is one of the most important risk behaviours mediated by new media to be found among adolescents. It is global, and changes dynamically due to the continued development of the information [...] Read more.
This paper sets out to explain how adolescents interpret piracy. Digital piracy is one of the most important risk behaviours mediated by new media to be found among adolescents. It is global, and changes dynamically due to the continued development of the information society. To explore the phenomena related to piracy among adolescent Internet users we need to apply qualitative research methods. The sample contained 1320 Polish respondents. The research used the technique of qualitative research. Data was collected using a form containing an open question. Adolescents will answer in the form how they interpret digital piracy. The categories characterize how piracy is perceived, and includes downloading various files—whether video or music files or even software (also games)—from unauthorized sources (P2P—Peer-to-peer ‘warez’ servers—websites which serve as repositories of illegal files). The qualitative data analysis allowed the identification of the following constructs in the perception of digital piracy by adolescents: ethical (giving value to the phenomenon), economical (showing profits and losses), legal (connected with punitive consequences and criminal liability), praxeological (facilitating daily life), technical (referring to the hardware necessary), social (the scale of the phenomenon and interpersonal relations), and personal benefits. The results fit into the discussion on the standard and hidden factors connected with piracy. The presented seven categories of the perception of piracy help us better understand the phenomenon of the infringement of intellectual property law and will help to develop appropriate preventive measures. Qualitative research makes it possible to understand the phenomenon of piracy from a deeper perspective, which can be translated into the design of effective educational measures. Preventive guidance on minimising risky behaviour is part of the development of one of the key competences, namely digital knowledge and skills. The research allowed us to enrich the theoretical knowledge on risky behaviours in cyberspace among adolescents (theoretical aim), to understand how to interpret risky behaviours in cyberspace (understanding of micro-worlds—cognitive aim), and to gather new knowledge that will be useful for prevention (practical aim). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Interactions between Virtual Spaces and Schools: A Collective Case Study
Future Internet 2020, 12(12), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi12120217 - 02 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 803
Abstract
Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) play an important role in the current educational panorama. Their presence in educational centers has increased in the last decade due to the constant development of educational policies focused on their inclusion in the classroom. However, the integration [...] Read more.
Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) play an important role in the current educational panorama. Their presence in educational centers has increased in the last decade due to the constant development of educational policies focused on their inclusion in the classroom. However, the integration of ICT in educational spaces and practices has still not reach the levels desired by international organizations such as the OECD and UNESCO. The aim of this study is to understand the nature of the interaction between virtual spaces and school spaces, and how this interaction affects the development of students’ learning processes. To this end, we follow an interpretive research methodology using a collective case study with four students from Spain. The results highlight the scarce integration of ICT into educational centers and teaching practices. However, virtual spaces play an important role in the development of other learning processes, such as informed learning, informal learning, and learning outside of the school context. In this work, we also provide a brief overview of changes in the current educational situation due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Digital Competence and Gender: Teachers in Training. A Case Study
Future Internet 2020, 12(11), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi12110204 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 850
Abstract
The ICTs are simultaneously an important tool and subject in teacher training. It, therefore, follows that digital competence is fundamental and constitutes a significant educational challenge, particularly the digital divide or gap by gender. The aim is to identify and analyze self-perceptions of [...] Read more.
The ICTs are simultaneously an important tool and subject in teacher training. It, therefore, follows that digital competence is fundamental and constitutes a significant educational challenge, particularly the digital divide or gap by gender. The aim is to identify and analyze self-perceptions of digital skills, and the possible relationship of these to gender, in first-year university students taking a degree in primary education teacher training at a Spanish faculty of education. This is a descriptive study using ex-post-facto method and collecting data from a questionnaire administered for four consecutive years to the above-mentioned subjects. The results revealed gender differences in the students’ reported perceptions. Men were more likely to perceive themselves as competent in the use of ICTs, reporting better information management and online collaboration skills using digital media. Besides, they made more use of computers as their sole device for browsing, downloading, and streaming and felt more confident about solving problems with devices. In contrast, women reported making more use of mobile phones and were more familiar with social media and aspects related to image and text processing and graphic design. Full article
Back to TopTop