Special Issue "Rice: From Staple Food to Innovative, Safe, Authentic and Healthy Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carla Brites
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
INIAV, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária, Food Technology and Safety
Interests: rice; TRACE-Rice; food chemistry; food science; maize; viscoelasticity; food processing and engineering; food technology; food analysis; starch; genotyping
Prof. Dr. Ken'ichi Ohtsubo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niigata, Japan
Interests: cereal science and processing; quality assay and processing of rice grains; bio-functional rice bread; rice noodles; rice cake; PCR technology of rice authentications
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Cristina M. Rosell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CSIC, Inst Agrochem & Food Technol IATA, Valencia, Spain
Interests: enzyme activity; food and nutrition; enzymes; proteins; food technology; food processing and engineering; food analysis; biochemistry; food processing; food chemistry

Special Issue Information

Rice is the primary staple food for about half of the world’s population and it provides 20% of the calories consumed worldwide. The relevance of rice has been increasing due to its fundamental role in modern and healthy diets, that has been accompanied of many research and innovations. Rice is endowed with a rich genetic diversity that covers a great range of varieties with different food applications, urges the need for authenticity tools to prevent fraudulent variety claims. Rice safety challenges are related to chemical and biological contaminants. The application of new technologies and blockchain approach for adding value to the grain and for the conversion of by-products in innovative ingredients will contribute to the development of healthy and tasteful rice-based foods.

Dr. Carla Brites
Prof. Dr. Cristina M. Rosell
Prof. Dr. Ken'ichi Ohtsubo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rice authenticity tools
  • rice contaminants
  • rice by-products
  • rice based healthy ingredients and foods
  • rice blockchain approach

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Down-Regulation of FAD2-1 Gene Expression Alters Lysophospholipid Composition in the Endosperm of Rice Grain and Influences Starch Properties
Foods 2021, 10(6), 1169; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061169 - 23 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 558
Abstract
Small quantities of lipids accumulate in the white rice grains. These are grouped into non-starch lipid and starch lipid fractions that affect starch properties through association with starch. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) are two major lipid classes in the two fractions. Using [...] Read more.
Small quantities of lipids accumulate in the white rice grains. These are grouped into non-starch lipid and starch lipid fractions that affect starch properties through association with starch. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) are two major lipid classes in the two fractions. Using high-oleic rice grains, we investigated the fatty-acid composition in flour and starch by LC-MS and evaluated its impact on starch properties. In the wild-type grain, nearly 50% of fatty acids in LPC and LPE were palmitic acid (C16:0), over 20% linoleic acid (C18:2) and less than 10% oleic acid (C18:1). In the high-oleic rice grain, C18:1 increased at the expense of C18:2 and C16:0. The compositional changes in starch lipids suggest that LPC and LPE are transported to an amyloplast with an origin from endoplasmic reticulum-derived PC and PE during endosperm development. The high-dissociation temperature of the amylose-lipid complex (ALC) and restricted starch swelling power in the high-oleic rice starch indicates that the stability of the ALC involving C18:1 is higher than that of C18:2 and C16:0. This study provides insight into the lipid deposition and starch properties of rice grains with optimized fatty-acid composition. Full article
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Article
Green Processing, Germinating and Wet Milling Brown Rice (Oryza sativa) for Beverages: Physicochemical Effects
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1016; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081016 - 29 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 991
Abstract
Plant-based beverage consumption is increasing markedly. Value-added dehulled rice (Oryza sativa) germination was investigated to improve beverage qualities. Germinating brown rice has been shown to increase health-promoting compounds. Utilizing green processing, wholesome constituents, including bran, vitamins, minerals, oils, fiber and proteins [...] Read more.
Plant-based beverage consumption is increasing markedly. Value-added dehulled rice (Oryza sativa) germination was investigated to improve beverage qualities. Germinating brown rice has been shown to increase health-promoting compounds. Utilizing green processing, wholesome constituents, including bran, vitamins, minerals, oils, fiber and proteins should should convey forward into germinated brown rice beverages. Rapid visco-analyzer (RVA) data and trends established that brown rice, preheated brown rice and germinated brown rice had higher pasting temperatures than white rice. As pasting temperature in similar samples may be related to gelatinization, RVA helped guide the free-flowing processing protocol using temperatures slightly above those previously reported for Rondo gelatinization. Particle size analysis and viscometric evaluations indicate that the developed sprouted brown rice beverage is on track to have properties close to commercial samples, even though the sprouted brown rice beverage developed has no additives, fortifications, added oils or salts. Phenolics and γ-aminobutyric acid increased slightly in germinated brown rice, however, increases were not maintained throughout most stages of processing. Significantly lower inorganic arsenic levels (113 ng/g) were found in germinated (sprouted) brown rice, compared to Rondo white and brown rice, which is far below the USA threshold level of 200 ng/g. Full article
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Review

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Review
Rice Compounds with Impact on Diabetic Control
Foods 2021, 10(9), 1992; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10091992 - 25 Aug 2021
Viewed by 266
Abstract
Rice is one of the most cultivated and consumed cereals worldwide. It is composed of starch, which is an important source of diet energy, hypoallergenic proteins, and other bioactive compounds with known nutritional functionalities. Noteworthy is that the rice bran (outer layer of [...] Read more.
Rice is one of the most cultivated and consumed cereals worldwide. It is composed of starch, which is an important source of diet energy, hypoallergenic proteins, and other bioactive compounds with known nutritional functionalities. Noteworthy is that the rice bran (outer layer of rice grains), a side-stream product of the rice milling process, has a higher content of bioactive compounds than white rice (polished rice grains). Bran functional ingredients such as γ-oryzanol, phytic acid, ferulic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, tocopherols, and tocotrienols (vitamin E) have been linked to several health benefits. In this study, we reviewed the effects of rice glycemic index, macronutrients, and bioactive compounds on the pathological mechanisms associated with diabetes, identifying the rice compounds potentially exerting protective activities towards disease control. The effects of starch, proteins, and bran bioactive compounds for diabetic control were reviewed and provide important insights about the nutritional quality of rice-based foods. Full article
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Review
Risk of Bacillus cereus in Relation to Rice and Derivatives
Foods 2021, 10(2), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020302 - 02 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 854
Abstract
Rice is a very popular food throughout the world and the basis of the diet of the citizens of many countries. It is used as a raw material for the preparation of many complex dishes in which different ingredients are involved. Rice, as [...] Read more.
Rice is a very popular food throughout the world and the basis of the diet of the citizens of many countries. It is used as a raw material for the preparation of many complex dishes in which different ingredients are involved. Rice, as a consequence of their cultivation, harvesting, and handling, is often contaminated with spores of Bacillus cereus, a ubiquitous microorganism found mainly in the soil. B. cereus can multiply under temperature conditions as low as 4 °C in foods that contain rice and have been cooked or subjected to treatments that do not produce commercial sterility. B. cereus produces diarrhoeal or emetic foodborne toxin when the consumer eats food in which a sufficient number of cells have grown. These circumstances mean that every year many outbreaks of intoxication or intestinal problems related to this microorganism are reported. This work is a review from the perspective of risk assessment of the risk posed by B. cereus to the health of consumers and of some control measures that can be used to mitigate such a risk. Full article

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: DNA based tools for rice varieties authentication
Authors: M. Oliveira
Affiliation: ITQB-NOVA, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier. Portugal

Title: Rice bioactive compounds with impact in diabetic control
Authors: Carla Moita Brites
Affiliation: INIAV, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária, Portugal.

Title: Integrated mapping of existing solutions to prevent insect infestation, mycotoxin contamination and pathogen development
Authors: J. Oliveira
Affiliation: School of Engineering University College Cork, Ireland.

Title: Understanding the impact of ingredients interactions on rice based foods
Authors: Cristina M. Rosell
Affiliation: Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA-CSIC). Spain.

Title: Green Processing, Germinating and Wet Milling Brown Rice (Oryza sativa) for Beverages: Physicochemical Effects
Authors: John C. Beaulieu; Shawndrika S. Reed; Javier M. Obando-Ulloa; Stephen M. Boue; Marsha R. Cole
Affiliation: United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southern Regional Research Center, 1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd., New Orleans, LA 70124
Abstract: Plant-based beverage consumption is increasing markedly. Value-added dehulled rice (Oryza sativa) germination was investigated to improve beverage qualities. Germinating brown rice has been shown to increase health-promoting compounds. Utilizing green processing, the wholesome constituents including bran, vitamins, minerals, oils, fiber and proteins should convey forward into germinated brown rice beverages. Rapid visco analyser data and trends established brown rice, preheated brown rice and germinated brown rice had higher pasting temperatures than white rice. As pasting temperature in similar samples may be related to gelatinzation, RVA helped guide the free-flowing processing protocol using temperatures slightly above previously reported Rondo gelatinization. Particle size analysis and viscometric evaluations indicate the developed sprouted brown rice beverage is on track to have properties close to commercial samples, even though the sprouted brown rice beverage developed has no additives, fortifications, added oils or salts. Phenolics and γ-aminobutyric acid increased slightly in germinated brown rice however, increases were not maintained throughout most stages of processing. Significantly lower inorganic arsenic levels (113 ng/g) were found in germinated brown rice, far below the U.S. threshold level of 200 ng/g, compared to the starting Rondo white and brown rice. This will become diluted further upon pilot plant scale-up and pasteurization.

Title: Modulate the glycemic index of rice by physical processing
Authors: ristina M. Rosell
Affiliation: Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de Alimentos, IATA (CSIC)

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