Special Issue "Applications of Natural Products in Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Susana Gonzalez-Manzano
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidad de Salamanca, Spain
Interests: bioactive compounds; phenolic compounds; extraction and analysis of compounds in foods; structural characterization; stability and sensory properties of plant-based foods; compound transformations in food; antioxidant properties; health implications; polyphenol metabolites and analysis of compounds in biological systems
Prof. Dr. Montserrat Dueñas Paton
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidad de Salamanca, Spain
Interests: bioactive compounds; phenolic compounds; extraction and analysis of compounds in foods; structural characterization; stability and sensory properties of plant-based foods; compound transformations in food; antioxidant properties; health implications; polyphenol metabolites and analysis of compounds in biological systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The term “natural products” includes any substance produced by a living organism. The compounds or mixtures of compounds included in these substances can exert beneficial effects on the matrix of which they are part, i.e., foods, dietary supplements, or cosmetics. Among these beneficial effects are organoleptic characteristic modifications, extended the shelf life, and improved technological characteristics. Moreover, food can exert beneficial effects on the organism that consumes them. The growing number of scientific papers published in recent decades on the relationship between diet and the incidence of chronic diseases has highlighted the extraordinary possibilities offered by food to maintain, and even to improve, health status. A way to improve food is to add natural substances that produce different biological activities with the aim of maintaining or improving health. It is necessary to correctly evaluate the effects that natural compounds could exert on both the food matrix and the organism. Thus, the aim of this Special Issue of Foods is to provide a number of documents focused on the applications, evaluation of effects, and activities of natural products in food. Papers in which the mechanisms underlying the effects produced by the natural products are studied will also be included.

Prof. Susana Gonzalez-Manzano
Prof. Montserrat Dueñas Paton
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive compound
  • antioxidants
  • preservatives
  • natural additives
  • functional additives
  • flavoring agents
  • fragrances
  • food
  • nutrition
  • health

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Lupin Seed Protein Extract Can Efficiently Enrich the Physical Properties of Cookies Prepared with Alternative Flours
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081064 - 05 Aug 2020
Abstract
Legume proteins can be successfully used in bakery foods, like cookies, to obtain a protein-enriched product. A lupin extract (10 g/100 g) was added to gluten and gluten-free flours from different sources: rice, buckwheat, oat, kamut and spelt. The impact on the physical [...] Read more.
Legume proteins can be successfully used in bakery foods, like cookies, to obtain a protein-enriched product. A lupin extract (10 g/100 g) was added to gluten and gluten-free flours from different sources: rice, buckwheat, oat, kamut and spelt. The impact on the physical properties of the dough and cookies was evaluated for the different systems. Rice and buckwheat doughs were 20% firmer and 40% less cohesive than the others. The incorporation of lupin extract had a reduced impact on the shape parameters of the cookies, namely in terms of area and thickness. The texture differed over time and after eight weeks, the oat and buckwheat cookies enriched with lupin extract were significantly firmer than the cookies without lupin. The incorporation of lupin extract induced a certain golden-brown coloring on the cookies, making them more appealing: lightness (L*) values decreased, generally, for the cookies with lupin extract when compared to the controls. The aw and moisture content values were very low for all samples, suggesting a high stability food product. Hence, the addition of lupin extract brought some technological changes in the dough and cookies in all the flours tested but improved the final product quality which aligns with the trends in the food industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Natural Products in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Olive Leaf Extracts as Natural Preservative on Retailed Poultry Meat Quality
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1017; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081017 - 29 Jul 2020
Abstract
Poultry meat is commonly marketed at refrigerated temperatures (2–5 °C). The major concern for retailers and consumers is the quality and safety of refrigerated poultry meat. During the chilling period, poultry meat undergoes too many undesirable changes due to microbial growth that leads [...] Read more.
Poultry meat is commonly marketed at refrigerated temperatures (2–5 °C). The major concern for retailers and consumers is the quality and safety of refrigerated poultry meat. During the chilling period, poultry meat undergoes too many undesirable changes due to microbial growth that leads to spoilage and economic loss. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the effects of olive leaf extracts (OLE) used at three concentrations (0.25, 0.5, and 1%) on the sensory attributes, as well as the chemical and microbiological quality of raw poultry meat stored at 4 ± 1 °C for 15 days. The results revealed that the OLE addition reduced microbial growth successfully, and maintained the chemical quality and sensory attributes of poultry meat. Moreover, OLE extended the shelf-life of the poultry meat that held under proper refrigeration conditions up to 15 days compared to the control group, that was completely spoiled by the sixth day of storage. This study concludes that OLE could be used both as a natural antioxidant and an antimicrobial preservative for chilled poultry meat held at refrigerated temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Natural Products in Foods)
Open AccessArticle
Use of Gum Cordia (Cordia myxa) as a Natural Starch Modifier; Effect on Pasting, Thermal, Textural, and Rheological Properties of Corn Starch
Foods 2020, 9(7), 909; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9070909 - 10 Jul 2020
Abstract
Incorporation of hydrocolloid gums in native starches help to improve their pasting, thermal, rheological and textural properties along with improvement in the stability of starch gels. The use of Cordia gum is not widely studied as a starch modifier and this fact could [...] Read more.
Incorporation of hydrocolloid gums in native starches help to improve their pasting, thermal, rheological and textural properties along with improvement in the stability of starch gels. The use of Cordia gum is not widely studied as a starch modifier and this fact could make this study more interesting and unique. This study investigated the effects of the non-conventional hydrocolloid gum (Cordia gum) on corn starch properties. Corn starch and gum Cordia (GC) blends were prepared at different replacement levels (0%, 3%, 6%, 9%, and 12%). The effect of GC levels on pasting, thermal, rheological, and textural properties were evaluated using rapid viscoanalyzer, differential scanning colorimeter, rheometer, and texture analyzer. The presence of GC significantly increased starch gelatinization temperatures, enthalpies, peak viscosities, final viscosities, and setback viscosities. GC improved freeze thaw stability in starch. The shear rate (1/s) versus shear stress (σ) data of all samples fitted well to the simple power law model (R2 = 0.97–0.99). The control had the lowest flow behavior index (n; 0.17), which increased to (0.36–0.56) with increasing GC levels. The consistency index (K) of the starch-gum blends increased with increasing GC levels. The dominance of elastic properties over viscous properties was demonstrated by G′ > G″. The magnitudes of G′ and G″ increased with increasing GC concentration. The outcomes could help to use this modification method as an alternative to chemical and enzymatic modification with respect to cost, safety, less time consumption and less requirement of process modifications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Natural Products in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Improving the Quality Characteristics and Shelf Life of Meat and Growth Performance in Goose Fed Diets Supplemented with Vitamin E
Foods 2020, 9(6), 798; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060798 - 17 Jun 2020
Abstract
The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of dietary vitamin E on growth performance, cellular immunity, carcass characteristics, and meat quality in geese. Sixty-four one-day-old male geese were selected from 1200 goose chicks with the same average body weight (92.5 [...] Read more.
The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of dietary vitamin E on growth performance, cellular immunity, carcass characteristics, and meat quality in geese. Sixty-four one-day-old male geese were selected from 1200 goose chicks with the same average body weight (92.5 ± 2.5 g) and subjected to two treatments (basal diet or control and basal diet plus 120 mg/kg vitamin E supplement) with 4 replicates (8 geese per replicate) for 8 weeks. After slaughter, goose meat was aerobically packed in polyethylene packages and stored at 4 °C for 9 days. The results showed that vitamin E supplementation improved the growth performance, carcass yield percentage, and immune response of goose (p < 0.05). The addition of vitamin E in the diet significantly increased the protein and fat content of goose meat but decreased the moisture and ash content with respect to those obtained from the control diet. During storage, meat from the vitamin E treatment showed higher phenolic content and lower thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and total volatile nitrogen (TVB-N) values than those from the control treatment. Vitamin E supplementation increased the saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in goose meat. However, goose meat supplemented with vitamin E displayed a significantly (p < 0.05) higher PUFA/SFA ratio than those of the control group. Based on the results, it was concluded that vitamin E could be used to improve the growth performance of goose, the meat composition in terms of the protein and fat content, the nutritional value in terms of the fatty acid composition, and the shelf life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Natural Products in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Bioactive Potential of 2-Methoxy-4-vinylphenol and Benzofuran from Brassica oleracea L. var. capitate f, rubra (Red Cabbage) on Oxidative and Microbiological Stability of Beef Meat
Foods 2020, 9(5), 568; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050568 - 04 May 2020
Abstract
In the future, plant based phytochemicals will be considered as efficient replacement sources of chemical preservatives, to act as potential bio-preservatives. We investigated the antibacterial and antioxidant activity of red cabbage (RC) extracts using different solvents. Among all extracts, chloroform extract exhibited strong [...] Read more.
In the future, plant based phytochemicals will be considered as efficient replacement sources of chemical preservatives, to act as potential bio-preservatives. We investigated the antibacterial and antioxidant activity of red cabbage (RC) extracts using different solvents. Among all extracts, chloroform extract exhibited strong antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Hence, the phytochemical constitutions of the RC chloroform extract was examined by GC-MS analysis, and further, based on molecular docking analysis, revealed 2-Methoxy-4-vinylphenol and benzofuran as two major compounds found to be possessing higher degrees of interaction with DNA gyrase (4PLB; −8.63 Kcal.mol−1) and lipoprotein (LpxC−8.229 Kcal.mol−1), respectively, of the bacterial cell wall, which leads to higher antimicrobial efficacy. Further, it was confirmed with that the in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans model (but no cytotoxic effect) was exhibited in the MCF-7 cell line. Thus, we investigated the influence of this extract on the shelf life of meat under refrigeration storage. The physicochemical properties were observed periodically, and microbial analysis was conducted. The shelf life of the beef was enhanced (up to eight days) in terms of microbial and physiochemical properties, at 4 ± 2 °C when compared to control. We concluded that chloroform extract of RC has potential as a natural preservative in the meat processing industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Natural Products in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Chemical Composition, Antibacterial and Radical Scavenging Activity of Essential Oils from Satureja macrantha C.A.Mey. at Different Growth Stages
Foods 2020, 9(4), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040494 - 14 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Essential oils (EOs) from medicinal and aromatic plants are interesting products to be used as natural food preservatives. The EOs from the genus Satureja are reported to inhibit foodborne pathogens being worthy of use as food preservatives. Satureja macrantha is found in Western [...] Read more.
Essential oils (EOs) from medicinal and aromatic plants are interesting products to be used as natural food preservatives. The EOs from the genus Satureja are reported to inhibit foodborne pathogens being worthy of use as food preservatives. Satureja macrantha is found in Western and Northwest Iran and commonly used as a food flavoring agent and for the treatment of urinary diseases. The objective of the present study was to identify the chemical composition of S. macrantha EOs at different growth stages (vegetative, flowering and fruiting stages) and to evaluate their biological activities. Chemical compositions were analyzed using GC-FID and GC-MS. The antibacterial activity was evaluated using the broth microdilution method against the foodborne pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC23922), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC29212) (Gram-positive), Enterobacter aerogenes (ATCC13046) and Escherichia coli. The antioxidant activity was estimated using the DPPH, ABTS and reducing power assays. The yields of S. macrantha EOs were in the range of 1.4–1.8%, thus scalable for the manufacture of food preservatives on an industrial level. The main compounds of EOs were carvacrol (42.7–48.2%), thymol (0.2–16.5%), p-cymene (10.1–14.7%) and γ-terpinene (7.9–9.1%) in all phenological stages examined. The strongest antibacterial activity (MICs = 5–20 µg/mL) of the EOs was recorded in samples obtained during the flowering stage where carvacrol (42.7%) and thymol (16.5) were present both at high percentages. On the other hand, the antioxidant activity was found to be slightly higher in the other stages. As the EO obtained at flowering showed the best inhibitory properties against foodborne pathogenic bacteria, it is suggested that plants at this stage can be selected as main sources of food preservative agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Natural Products in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Bilberry and Sea Buckthorn Leaves and Their Subcritical Water Extracts Prevent Lipid Oxidation in Meat Products
Foods 2020, 9(3), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030265 - 02 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The aim of this study was to find new sustainable, Nordic natural antioxidant sources, develop subcritical water extraction (SWE) process for recovering the antioxidant compounds from the most potential raw materials, and to test their antioxidative effects in meat products. The antioxidant capacities [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to find new sustainable, Nordic natural antioxidant sources, develop subcritical water extraction (SWE) process for recovering the antioxidant compounds from the most potential raw materials, and to test their antioxidative effects in meat products. The antioxidant capacities of water and 50% ethanol (aq) extracts of 13 berry, grain, and horticultural plant materials as well as hexane/ethanol extracted stilbene fractions from pine heartwood and spruce inner bark were measured in hydrophilic and lipophilic systems. Tree, bilberry leaf (BL), and sea buckthorn leaf (SBL) extracts showed the highest antioxidant capacities. BL and SBL were selected for the development of SWE. The optimal conditions for recovering maximal antioxidative capacities were 110 °C/1 min for SBL and 120 °C/1 min for BL. Dried BL and SBL and the respective optimized subcritical water extracts were applied in chicken slices and pork sausage, and their ability to prevent lipid oxidation was evaluated during 8 and 20 days storage, respectively, at 6 °C. All tested plant ingredients effectively prevented lipid oxidation in the products compared to the control samples. Sensory acceptance of the plant ingredients was good, especially in the chicken product. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the antioxidant effects of SW extracted berry leaves in meat products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Natural Products in Foods)
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