Special Issue "Food Sustainability"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Rachel J.C. Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Director and Professor
Center for Sustainable Business and Development, 110 Jessie Harris Building, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1911, USA
Tel. 1-865-974-0505; Fax: +1 865 974 1838
Interests: sustainable business; sustainable development; sustainable consumer services; sustainable hospitality and tourism; branding; marketing; forecasting models; economic impacts
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will explore past and present research concerning food sustainability, any outstanding research articles with significant relevance to the special issue, or extensive review papers which refer to the latest research findings are welcome.

Prof. Rachel J.C. Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green restaurants;
  • from farm to the table;
  • food sustainability;
  • sustainable agriculture

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Perception of Organic Food Consumption in Romania
Foods 2017, 6(6), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6060042 - 30 May 2017
Cited by 11
Abstract
This study provides insight into the attitude of Romanian consumers towards organic food. Furthermore, it examines the sustainable food production system in Romania from the perspective of consumer behavior. This study used a mathematical model of linear regression with the main purpose being [...] Read more.
This study provides insight into the attitude of Romanian consumers towards organic food. Furthermore, it examines the sustainable food production system in Romania from the perspective of consumer behavior. This study used a mathematical model of linear regression with the main purpose being to determine the best prediction for the dependent variable when given a number of new values for the independent variable. This empirical research is based on a survey with a sample of 672 consumers, which uses a questionnaire to analyze their intentions towards sustainable food products. The results indicate that a more positive attitude of consumers towards organic food products will further strengthen their purchasing intentions, while the status of the consumption of organic consumers will not affect their willingness to purchase organic food products. Statistics have shown that sustainable food consumption is beneficial for health, so it can also become a profitable business in Romania. Furthermore, food sustainability in Romania depends on the ability of an organic food business to adapt to the new requirements of green consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Sustainability)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Goal of Adequate Nutrition: Can It Be Made Affordable, Sustainable, and Universal?
Foods 2016, 5(4), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5040082 - 30 Nov 2016
Abstract
Until about 1900, large proportions of the world population endured hunger and poverty. The 20th century saw world population increase from 1.6 to 6.1 billion, accompanied and to some extent made possible by rapid improvements in health standards and food supply, with associated [...] Read more.
Until about 1900, large proportions of the world population endured hunger and poverty. The 20th century saw world population increase from 1.6 to 6.1 billion, accompanied and to some extent made possible by rapid improvements in health standards and food supply, with associated advances in agricultural and nutrition sciences. In this paper, I use the application of linear programming (LP) in preparation of rations for farm animals to illustrate a method of calculating the lowest cost of a human diet selected from locally available food items, constrained to provide recommended levels of food energy and nutrients; then, to find a realistic minimum cost, I apply the further constraint that the main sources of food energy in the costed diet are weighted in proportion to the actual reported consumption of food items in that area. Worldwide variations in dietary preferences raise the issue as to the sustainability of popular dietary regimes, and the paper reviews the factors associated with satisfying requirements for adequate nutrition within those regimes. The ultimate physical constraints on food supply are described, together with the ways in which climate change may affect those constraints. During the 20th century, food supply increased sufficiently in most areas to keep pace with the rapid increase in world population. Many challenges will need to be overcome if food supply is to continue to meet demand, and those challenges are made more severe by rising expectations of quality of life in the developing world, as well as by the impacts of climate change on agriculture and aquaculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Sustainability)
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