Special Issue "Chromatography Analysis Applied in Food Science"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Miguel Palma Lovillo
Website
Guest Editor
Universidad de Cadiz, Cadiz, Spain
Interests: bioactive compounds; functional foods; analytical methods; separation methods; spectroscopic methods
Dr. Widiastuti Setyaningsih
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Universitas Gadjah Mada
Interests: bioactive compounds, functional foods, analytical methods, separation methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chromatography is the most used analytical technique in the separation of individual compounds in foods and other matrices. It is usually applied in the characterization of bioactive compounds and aroma-related compounds to foods. Therefore, it is specifically interesting for food control, food development, food safety, and the control of raw material for food production. As a consequence, chromatography is a very common analytical technique in food companies and food research centers.

The Special Issue on “Chromatography Analysis Applied in Food Science” is planned to cover a wide range of topics on liquid chromatography and gas chromatography applied in food samples. Papers dealing with both the chromatographic method development and with the application of chromatographic methods on food topics, including raw materials, will be welcome. Additionally, papers discussing the results from chromatographic analyses on food products or raw materials for food production will be included.

We kindly invite researchers on food topics and chromatography to submit original contributions to this Special Issue in order to present the most recent research on chromatography on food sciences to the readers of the Foods journal. We would greatly appreciate it if you respond to confirm your contribution and the proposed title by 30 November 2019 to assist in planning the whole project.

Prof. Miguel Palma
Dr. Widiastuti Setyaningsih
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foods
  • chromatography
  • HPLC
  • GC
  • bioactive compounds
  • aroma

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Validation of an Analytical Method for Nitrite and Nitrate Determination in Meat Foods for Infants by Ion Chromatography with Conductivity Detection
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1238; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091238 - 04 Sep 2020
Abstract
Nitrate and nitrite as sodium or potassium salts are usually added to meat products to develop the characteristic flavor, to inhibit the growth of microorganisms (particularly Clostridium botulinum), and effectively control rancidity by inhibiting lipid oxidation. However, both nitrate and nitrite ions [...] Read more.
Nitrate and nitrite as sodium or potassium salts are usually added to meat products to develop the characteristic flavor, to inhibit the growth of microorganisms (particularly Clostridium botulinum), and effectively control rancidity by inhibiting lipid oxidation. However, both nitrate and nitrite ions need to be monitored for ensuring the quality and safety of cured meats. In this work, for the first time the content of nitrite and nitrate ions in homogenized meat samples of baby foods was determined by a validated method based on ion chromatography (IC) coupled with conductivity detection. Recoveries of nitrate and nitrite ions in meat samples were not lower than 84 ± 6%. The detection limits of nitrate and nitrite were 0.08 mg L−1 and 0.13 mg L−1, respectively. Five commercial samples of homogenized meat, namely lamb, rabbit, chicken, veal, and beef, for infant feeding were investigated; while nitrite content was below the detection limit, nitrate ranged from 10.7 to 21.0 mg kg−1. The results indicated that nitrate contents were below the European (EU) fixed value of 200 mg kg−1, and an acceptable daily intake of 3.7 mg kg−1 was estimated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chromatography Analysis Applied in Food Science)
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Open AccessArticle
Development and Validation of HPLC-DAD Method for Simultaneous Determination of Seven Food Additives and Caffeine in Powdered Drinks
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1119; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081119 - 13 Aug 2020
Abstract
The usage of food additives must respect the general legislation in force in the country and requires a reliable analytical method for surveillance. This research aimed to develop a high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) method for the simultaneous determination of [...] Read more.
The usage of food additives must respect the general legislation in force in the country and requires a reliable analytical method for surveillance. This research aimed to develop a high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) method for the simultaneous determination of seven food additives and caffeine in powdered drinks. Three factors likely to affect the chromatographic separation, namely, mobile phase composition at the beginning (x1, 0–10% of the amount of methanol in the phosphate buffer) and the end (x2, 60–100% of the amount of methanol in the phosphate buffer) of the gradient program and pH (x3, 3–7), were evaluated with the aid of a Box–Behnken Design (BBD). Subsequently, multi-response optimizations for chromatographic resolutions (Rs) and analysis time were performed using the response surface methodology (RSM) in conjunction with the desirability function (DF). Complete separation (Rs > 1.5) of seven food additives and caffeine was achieved in less than 16 min by applying 8.5% methanol in the phosphate buffer at the beginning and 90% at the end of the gradient program, in pH 6.7. The developed method was validated with low limits of detection (ranging from 1.16 mg kg−1 (sodium saccharin) to 3.00 mg kg−1 (acesulfame potassium)), low limits of quantification (ranging from 3.86 mg kg−1 (sodium saccharin) to 10.02 mg kg−1 (acesulfame potassium)), high precision (CV < 4%), and high accuracy (recoveries from 95 to 101% at 80, 100, and 120% of the target concentration). The method was successfully used to assess the seven food additives and caffeine in commercially available powdered drinks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chromatography Analysis Applied in Food Science)
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Open AccessArticle
A Validated Method for Cholesterol Determination in Turkey Meat Products Using Relative Response Factors
Foods 2019, 8(12), 684; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120684 - 15 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The objective of this study was to develop a precise and accurate method to quantify cholesterol in turkey meat products using relative response factors, based on a modification of a previously published method for plant sterols determination. Validation was performed using neat solutions [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to develop a precise and accurate method to quantify cholesterol in turkey meat products using relative response factors, based on a modification of a previously published method for plant sterols determination. Validation was performed using neat solutions to determine linearity, precision, and accuracy. The method was linear in the concentration range considered (1–20 µg/mL, r2 ≥ 0.991). Precision and accuracy were within the acceptability guidelines of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for method validation (<20% relative standard deviation (RSD) at the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) and <15% RSD for other standards). Turkey meat was spiked with cholesterol at two levels (low = 3 µg/mL and high = 18 µg/mL), either before or after saponification, to establish the recovery and matrix effects. Recovery ranged from 94% to 105%, with a mean value of 105% at the low spike level and 95% at the high spike level. No significant matrix effects were found (90% to 112% recovery). This method is reliable for the quantification of cholesterol in turkey meat products in the range 0.4–8 mg/g. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chromatography Analysis Applied in Food Science)
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