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Open AccessArticle

Validation of an Analytical Method for Nitrite and Nitrate Determination in Meat Foods for Infants by Ion Chromatography with Conductivity Detection

1
Department of Science, University of Basilicata, Via dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy
2
Department of European and Mediterranean Cultures: Architecture, Environment, Cultural Heritage, University of Basilicata, Via Lanera, 20, 75100 Matera, Italy
3
Department of Geography, Environmental Management and Energy Studies, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006, Johannesburg 2028, South Africa
4
Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1238; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091238
Received: 26 July 2020 / Revised: 28 August 2020 / Accepted: 31 August 2020 / Published: 4 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chromatography Analysis Applied in Food Science)
Nitrate and nitrite as sodium or potassium salts are usually added to meat products to develop the characteristic flavor, to inhibit the growth of microorganisms (particularly Clostridium botulinum), and effectively control rancidity by inhibiting lipid oxidation. However, both nitrate and nitrite ions need to be monitored for ensuring the quality and safety of cured meats. In this work, for the first time the content of nitrite and nitrate ions in homogenized meat samples of baby foods was determined by a validated method based on ion chromatography (IC) coupled with conductivity detection. Recoveries of nitrate and nitrite ions in meat samples were not lower than 84 ± 6%. The detection limits of nitrate and nitrite were 0.08 mg L−1 and 0.13 mg L−1, respectively. Five commercial samples of homogenized meat, namely lamb, rabbit, chicken, veal, and beef, for infant feeding were investigated; while nitrite content was below the detection limit, nitrate ranged from 10.7 to 21.0 mg kg−1. The results indicated that nitrate contents were below the European (EU) fixed value of 200 mg kg−1, and an acceptable daily intake of 3.7 mg kg−1 was estimated. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ion chromatography; conductivity detection; homogenized meat; baby food; nitrite; nitrate Ion chromatography; conductivity detection; homogenized meat; baby food; nitrite; nitrate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Coviello, D.; Pascale, R.; Ciriello, R.; Salvi, A.M.; Guerrieri, A.; Contursi, M.; Scrano, L.; Bufo, S.A.; Cataldi, T.R.; Bianco, G. Validation of an Analytical Method for Nitrite and Nitrate Determination in Meat Foods for Infants by Ion Chromatography with Conductivity Detection. Foods 2020, 9, 1238.

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