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Article

Antioxidant HPTLC-DPPH Fingerprinting of Honeys and Tracking of Antioxidant Constituents upon Thermal Exposure

1
Cooperative Research Centre for Honey Bee Products Limited (CRC HBP), University of Western Australia, Myers Building, M087, Perth 6009, Australia
2
Division of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Australia
3
School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Miguel Palma Lovillo
Foods 2021, 10(2), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020357
Received: 10 January 2021 / Revised: 1 February 2021 / Accepted: 3 February 2021 / Published: 7 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chromatography Analysis Applied in Food Science)
The use of High-Performance Thin-Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) coupled with the use of DPPH* (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) as a derivatisation reagent is a novel approach to the analysis of antioxidant activity of honeys. The method facilitates the visualisation of individual constituents that contribute to the overall antioxidant activity of the honey, even if they are not yet chemically identified, and allows for the quantification of their antioxidant activity as gallic acid equivalents. The method supports a more in-depth study of the antioxidant activity of honey as it allows for a comparative analysis of the antioxidant fingerprints of honeys of different floral origin and is able to capture differences in their individual bioactive constituents. Further, it supports the tracking of changes in antioxidant activity of individual honey constituents over time upon exposure to different temperature conditions, which demonstrates the potential value of the method for in-process quality control. View Full-Text
Keywords: food analysis; antioxidant band activity; Leptospermum; Eucalyptus; Marri; degradation monitoring food analysis; antioxidant band activity; Leptospermum; Eucalyptus; Marri; degradation monitoring
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MDPI and ACS Style

Islam, M.K.; Sostaric, T.; Lim, L.Y.; Hammer, K.; Locher, C. Antioxidant HPTLC-DPPH Fingerprinting of Honeys and Tracking of Antioxidant Constituents upon Thermal Exposure. Foods 2021, 10, 357. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020357

AMA Style

Islam MK, Sostaric T, Lim LY, Hammer K, Locher C. Antioxidant HPTLC-DPPH Fingerprinting of Honeys and Tracking of Antioxidant Constituents upon Thermal Exposure. Foods. 2021; 10(2):357. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020357

Chicago/Turabian Style

Islam, Md K., Tomislav Sostaric, Lee Y. Lim, Katherine Hammer, and Cornelia Locher. 2021. "Antioxidant HPTLC-DPPH Fingerprinting of Honeys and Tracking of Antioxidant Constituents upon Thermal Exposure" Foods 10, no. 2: 357. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020357

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