Advances in Cereal and Cereal Product Chemistry, Nutrition and Technology Volume II

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Grain".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 1355

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Biological Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001, China
Interests: cereal chemistry; cereal products; cereal proteins; processing technology; wheat dough; gluten
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
College of Biological Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001, China
Interests: cereal proteins; processing technology; nutritional functionality; instant noodles; gluten
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cereal, a special commodity with strategic significance, is an important part of the national security strategy and has crucial significance for the stable development of the national economy. Cereal chemistry is a subject that studies the physical, physiological and biochemical properties; nutritional function; processing technology and rational utilization of various cereals and cereal products. Research on cereal chemistry focuses on several aspects, including the external morphological characteristics of cereals; changes in the structural, physicochemical and biochemical properties of components during processing and storage and the processing technology and nutritional function of cereal products. Advances in research on cereal chemistry provides a theoretical basis for improving cereal quality, developing new cereal resources, evolving the storage and processing technology of cereal and cereal products, scientifically adjusting dietary structures, strengthening the quality control of cereal and cereal products and improving the level of raw material processing and comprehensive utilization of cereals. Therefore, this Special Issue welcomes all types of papers, including original research articles, reviews, brief communications and opinions related to the knowledge and application of cereal and cereal product chemistry, nutrition and technology. We are eager to receive your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Jinshui Wang
Dr. Ying Liang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cereal chemistry
  • cereal proteins
  • nutritional functionality
  • processing technology
  • wheat dough

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 4785 KiB  
Communication
The Effect of Acid Hydrolysis on the Pickering Emulsifying Capacity of Tartary Buckwheat Flour
by Shijie Zhang, Changsheng Guo and Benguo Liu
Foods 2024, 13(10), 1543; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13101543 - 15 May 2024
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Abstract
The effect of sulfuric acid hydrolysis on the Pickering emulsifying capacity of Tartary buckwheat flour (TBF) rich in starch was evaluated for the first time. The results indicate that the sulfuric acid concentration and hydrolysis time had a significant impact on the Pickering [...] Read more.
The effect of sulfuric acid hydrolysis on the Pickering emulsifying capacity of Tartary buckwheat flour (TBF) rich in starch was evaluated for the first time. The results indicate that the sulfuric acid concentration and hydrolysis time had a significant impact on the Pickering emulsifying capacity of acid-hydrolyzed Tartary buckwheat flour (HTBF). A low sulfuric acid concentration (1–2 mol/L) could reduce the particle size of HTBF, but it also decreased the Pickering emulsifying ability. At a sulfuric acid concentration of 3 mol/L, appropriate treatment time (2 and 3 days) led to particle aggregation but significantly improved wettability, thereby resulting in a rapid enhancement in emulsifying capacity. Under these conditions, the obtained HTBF (HTBF-D2-C3 and HTBF-D3-C3) could stabilize medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)-based Pickering high-internal-phase emulsions (HIPEs) with an oil-phase volume fraction of 80% at the addition amounts (c) of ≥1.0% and ≥1.5%, respectively. Its performance was significantly superior to that of TBF (c ≥ 2.0%). Furthermore, at the same addition amount, the droplet size of HIPEs constructed by HTBF-D3-C3 was smaller than that of HTBF-D2-C3, and its gel strength and microrheological performance were also superior to those of HTBF-D2-C3, which was attributed to the higher wettability of HTBF-D3-C3. The findings of this study can facilitate the in-depth application of Tartary buckwheat and provide references for the development of novel Pickering emulsifiers. Full article
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17 pages, 8658 KiB  
Article
Effect of Sprouted Buckwheat on Glycemic Index and Quality of Reconstituted Rice
by Lingtao Kang, Jiaqian Luo, Zhipeng Su, Liling Zhou, Qiutao Xie and Gaoyang Li
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1148; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081148 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 631
Abstract
This study utilized sprouted buckwheat as the main component and aimed to optimize its combination with other grains to produce reconstituted rice with enhanced taste and a reduced glycemic index (GI). The optimal blend comprised wheat flour, sprouted buckwheat flour, black rice flour, [...] Read more.
This study utilized sprouted buckwheat as the main component and aimed to optimize its combination with other grains to produce reconstituted rice with enhanced taste and a reduced glycemic index (GI). The optimal blend comprised wheat flour, sprouted buckwheat flour, black rice flour, and purple potato flour in a ratio of 34.5:28.8:26.7:10.0. Based on this blend, the reconstituted rice processed through extrusion puffing exhibited a purple-black hue; meanwhile, the instant reconstituted rice, produced through further microwave puffing, displayed a reddish-brown color. both imparted a rich cereal flavor. The starch in both types of rice exhibited a V-shaped structure with lower relative crystallinity. Compared to commercial rice, the reconstituted rice and instant reconstituted rice contained higher levels of flavonoids, polyphenols, and other flavor compounds, along with 1.63-fold and 1.75-fold more proteins, respectively. The GI values of the reconstituted rice and the instant reconstituted rice were 68.86 and 69.47, respectively; thus, they are medium-GI foods that can alleviate the increase in blood glucose levels. Full article
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