Special Issue "Spectroscopy Application in Food Analysis"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Daniel Cozzolino

School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia
E-Mail
Interests: infrared spectroscopy; chemometrics; food chemistry; vibrational spectroscopy; NIR

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pioneered by physicists and chemists, methods based on infrared spectroscopy have traditionally been used for the analysis of several food matrices. Vibrational spectroscopy embraces a number of techniques and methods that include visible (VIS), mid-infrared (MIR), near infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy. As these technologies or methods further develop by incorporating different sampling and presentation methods (e.g., attenuated total reflection, Fourier transform, transmittance, transflectance, reflectance, diffuse reflectance, hyperspectral and multispectral), new applications can be developed. These techniques are recognized as powerful tools for the routine analysis of several foods. Today, it is well recognised that spectroscopy not only can measure several biomolecules but also other characteristics or properties of the food (e.g., functionality, origin). This Special Issue welcomes submissions on the applications of spectroscopy for the analysis of quality and functionality in different food matrices.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Daniel Cozzolino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • spectroscopy
  • visible spectroscopy
  • UV-Visible Spectroscopy
  • infrared spectroscopy
  • near infrared spectroscopy
  • Raman spectroscopy
  • food analysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Quantitative Characterization of Arnicae flos by RP-HPLC-UV and NIR Spectroscopy
Received: 22 November 2018 / Revised: 15 December 2018 / Accepted: 17 December 2018 / Published: 24 December 2018
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Abstract
The possibility of applying near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to monitor 13 active components (phenolic acids, flavonoids, and sesquiterpene lactones) in Arnicae flos was studied. The preprocessing of the spectra were performed by using the conventional Golay-Savitzky procedure and the newly developed step-by-step filter. The [...] Read more.
The possibility of applying near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to monitor 13 active components (phenolic acids, flavonoids, and sesquiterpene lactones) in Arnicae flos was studied. The preprocessing of the spectra were performed by using the conventional Golay-Savitzky procedure and the newly developed step-by-step filter. The results obtained show that the step-by-step filter derivatives provide a better signal-to-noise ratio at a lower convolution window. Better calibration for the content of protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-cumaric acid, ferulic acid, isoquercitrin, and quercetin were obtained by step-by-step filter derivatives, compared to the direct raw spectra processing and the Golay-Savitzky approach. Although the step-by-step filter substantially reduces the spectral distortion, the convolution procedure leads to loss of spectral points in the red end of the spectral curve. Probably for this reason this approach shows better calibration only in seven of the monitored 13 active components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy Application in Food Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Prediction of Agro-Morphological and Nutritional Traits in Ethiopian Mustard Leaves (Brassica Carinata A. Braun) by Visible-Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Received: 21 November 2018 / Revised: 16 December 2018 / Accepted: 20 December 2018 / Published: 22 December 2018
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Abstract
The particular characteristics of some of the Ethiopian mustard accessions available from seed banks could be used to increase the production and the diversity of products available to consumers and to improve their general quality. The objectives of this study were to determine [...] Read more.
The particular characteristics of some of the Ethiopian mustard accessions available from seed banks could be used to increase the production and the diversity of products available to consumers and to improve their general quality. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variability for agro-morphological (days to first flowering: DFF and leaf pubescence: LP) and nutritional traits (total phenolic content: TPC) among accessions, and to evaluate the potential of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict these traits in Ethiopian mustard leaves. A great variation was found for the traits evaluated. The reference values were regressed against different spectral transformations by modified partial least-squares (MPLS) regression. The coefficients of determination in cross-validation (R2cv) shown by the equations for DFF, LP and TPC were 0.95, 0.63 and 0.99, respectively. The standard deviation to standard error of cross-validation ratio (RPD), were for these traits, as follows: DFF: 4.52, LP: 1.53 and, TPC: 24.50. These results show that the equations developed for DFF and TPC in Ethiopian mustard, can be predicted with sufficient accuracy for screening purposes and quality control, respectively. In addition, the LP equation can be used to identify those samples with “low”, “medium” and “high” groups. From the study of the mean and deviation standard spectra, and regression vectors of MPLS models it can be concluded that some major cell components, highly participated in modelling the equations for these traits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy Application in Food Analysis)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Critical Review on the Utilization of Handheld and Portable Raman Spectrometry in Meat Science
Received: 18 December 2018 / Revised: 27 January 2019 / Accepted: 28 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
Traditional methods for the determination of meat quality-relevant parameters are rather time-consuming and destructive, whereas spectroscopic methods offer fast and non-invasive measurements. This review critically deals with the application of handheld and portable Raman devices in the meat sector. Some published articles on [...] Read more.
Traditional methods for the determination of meat quality-relevant parameters are rather time-consuming and destructive, whereas spectroscopic methods offer fast and non-invasive measurements. This review critically deals with the application of handheld and portable Raman devices in the meat sector. Some published articles on this topic tend to convey the impression of unrestricted applicability of mentioned devices in this field of research. Furthermore, results are often subjected to over-optimistic interpretations without being underpinned by adequate test set validation. On the other hand, deviations in reference methods for meat quality assessment and the inhomogeneity of the meat matrix pose a challange to Raman spectroscopy and multivariate models. Nonetheless, handheld and portable Raman devices show considerable potential for some applications in the meat sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy Application in Food Analysis)
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