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Special Issue "Infrared Spectroscopy and Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. James Chapman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Applied Chemistry Discipline, School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia
Interests: chemistry; biofouling; antifouling materials; environmental monitoring; sensors; materials science; biomaterials; analytical chemistry; nanomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The increasing desire to control and monitor in real-time (e.g. on-line, at line) different samples (e.g. foods, soils, etc) demands the development of innovative analytical systems (e.g. combination of sensors and multivariate data analysis).  For example, it has been clearly established that the ability to analyse complex chemical samples such as foods or environmental samples, is now essential to achieve consistent quality during production demanded by regulators and the consumers in order to ensure uniformity and consistency within a brand and even to avoid fraud, which can have direct implications when it comes to food safety and security.

In complex matrices (foods, soils, plant tissues) the use of sensor systems combined with multivariate data analysis (chemometrics) is especially promising as tools for an encompassing analysis and understanding of the determining factors that contribute to the signature of a sample (the so called fingerprint).

The Special Issue “Infrared Spectroscopy and Sensors” aims to summarize the state of the art of the research, technology and novel applications on infrared spectroscopy sensors. The Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following applications:

  • Near infrared
  • Mid infrared
  • Hyperspectral imaging
  • Chemometrics
  • Data pre-processing
  • Applications (food, environment)

Prof. Dr. Daniel Cozzolino
Dr. James Chapman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Infrared Spectroscopy
  • Chemometrics
  • vibrational spectroscopy
  • NIR
  • MIR

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Methylated Poly(ethylene)imine Modified Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer for Measurements of CO2 and SO2 in Their Mixtures
Sensors 2019, 19(14), 3236; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19143236 - 23 Jul 2019
Abstract
A gravimetric gas detection device based on surface functionalized Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (CMUTs) was designed, fabricated and tested for detection of carbon dioxide (CO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) mixtures in nitrogen. The created measurement setup of continuous data [...] Read more.
A gravimetric gas detection device based on surface functionalized Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (CMUTs) was designed, fabricated and tested for detection of carbon dioxide (CO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) mixtures in nitrogen. The created measurement setup of continuous data collection, integrated with an in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, allows for better understanding of the mechanisms and molecular interactions with the sensing layer (methylated poly(ethylene)imine) and its need of surface functionalization for multiple gas detection. During experimentation with CO2 gases, weak molecular interactions were observed in spectroscopy data. Linear sensor response to frequency shift was observed with CO2 concentrations ranging from 0.16 vol % to 1 vol %. Moreover, the Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy data showed much stronger SO2 and the polymer interactions, molecules were bound by stronger forces and irreversibly changed the polymer film properties. However, the sensor change in resonance frequency in the tested region of 1 vol % to 5 vol % SO2 showed a linear response. This effect changed not only the device resonance frequency but also affected the magnitude of electroacoustic impedance which was used for differentiating the gas mixture of CO2, SO2, in dry N2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infrared Spectroscopy and Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Combining Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy with Chemometric Methods to Detect Adulterations in Milk Powder
Sensors 2019, 19(13), 2934; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19132934 - 03 Jul 2019
Abstract
Adulteration is one of the major concerns among all the quality problems of milk powder. Soybean flour and rice flour are harmless adulterations in the milk powder. In this study, mid-infrared spectroscopy was used to detect the milk powder adulterated with rice flour [...] Read more.
Adulteration is one of the major concerns among all the quality problems of milk powder. Soybean flour and rice flour are harmless adulterations in the milk powder. In this study, mid-infrared spectroscopy was used to detect the milk powder adulterated with rice flour or soybean flour and simultaneously determine the adulterations content. Partial least squares (PLS), support vector machine (SVM) and extreme learning machine (ELM) were used to establish classification and regression models using full spectra and optimal wavenumbers. ELM models using the optimal wavenumbers selected by principal component analysis (PCA) loadings obtained good results with all the sensitivity and specificity over 90%. Regression models using the full spectra and the optimal wavenumbers selected by successive projections algorithm (SPA) obtained good results, with coefficient of determination (R2) of calibration and prediction all over 0.9 and the predictive residual deviation (RPD) over 3. The classification results of ELM models and the determination results of adulterations content indicated that the mid-infrared spectroscopy was an effective technique to detect the rice flour and soybean flour adulteration in the milk powder. This study would help to apply mid-infrared spectroscopy to the detection of adulterations such as rice flour and soybean flour in real-world conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infrared Spectroscopy and Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Grading and Sorting of Grape Berries Using Visible-Near Infrared Spectroscopy on the Basis of Multiple Inner Quality Parameters
Sensors 2019, 19(11), 2600; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19112600 - 07 Jun 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The potential of visible-near infrared (vis/NIR) spectroscopy (400 nm to 1100 nm) for classification of grape berries on the basis of multi inner quality parameters was investigated. Stored Vitis vinifera L. cv. Manicure Finger and Vitis vinifera L. cv. Ugni Blanc grape [...] Read more.
The potential of visible-near infrared (vis/NIR) spectroscopy (400 nm to 1100 nm) for classification of grape berries on the basis of multi inner quality parameters was investigated. Stored Vitis vinifera L. cv. Manicure Finger and Vitis vinifera L. cv. Ugni Blanc grape berries were separated into three classes based on the distribution of total soluble solid content (SSC) and total phenolic compounds (TP). Partial least squares regression (PLS) was applied to predict the quality parameters, including color space CIELAB, SSC, and TP. The prediction results showed that the vis/NIR spectrum correlated with the SSC and TP present in the intact grape berries with determination coefficient of prediction (RP2) in the range of 0.735 to 0.823. Next, the vis/NIR spectrum was used to distinguish between berries with different SSC and TP concentrations using partial least squares discrimination analysis (PLS-DA) with >77% accuracy. This study provides a method to identify stored grape quality classes based on the spectroscopy and distributions of multiple inner quality parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infrared Spectroscopy and Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Rapid Determination of Chlorogenic Acid, Luteoloside and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic Acid in Chrysanthemum Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Sensors 2019, 19(9), 1981; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19091981 - 28 Apr 2019
Abstract
The feasibility of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) to detect chlorogenic acid, luteoloside and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid in Chrysanthemum was investigated. An NIR spectroradiometer was applied for data acquisition. The reference values of chlorogenic acid, luteoloside, and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid of the samples were determined by high-performance [...] Read more.
The feasibility of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) to detect chlorogenic acid, luteoloside and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid in Chrysanthemum was investigated. An NIR spectroradiometer was applied for data acquisition. The reference values of chlorogenic acid, luteoloside, and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid of the samples were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and were used for model calibration. The results of six preprocessing methods were compared. To reduce input variables and collinearity problems, three methods for variable selection were compared, including successive projections algorithm (SPA), genetic algorithm-partial least squares regression (GA-PLS), and competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS). The selected variables were employed as the inputs of partial least square (PLS), back propagation-artificial neural networks (BP-ANN), and extreme learning machine (ELM) models. The best performance was achieved by BP-ANN models based on variables selected by CARS for all three chemical constituents. The values of rp2 (correlation coefficient of prediction) were 0.924, 0.927, 0.933, the values of RMSEP were 0.033, 0.018, 0.064 and the values of RPD were 3.667, 3.667, 2.891 for chlorogenic acid, luteoloside, and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, respectively. The results indicated that NIR spectroscopy combined with variables selection and multivariate calibration methods could be considered as a useful tool for rapid determination of chlorogenic acid, luteoloside, and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid in Chrysanthemum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infrared Spectroscopy and Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Gas Absorption Modules Based on Flexible Mid-Infrared Hollow Waveguides
Sensors 2019, 19(7), 1698; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071698 - 10 Apr 2019
Abstract
A new gas absorption module, the substrate-embedded hollow waveguide (eHWG) model, is proposed. It consists of a substrate with a curved channel and a hollow waveguide. The hollow waveguide is curved into the channel and works as a gas absorption cell as well [...] Read more.
A new gas absorption module, the substrate-embedded hollow waveguide (eHWG) model, is proposed. It consists of a substrate with a curved channel and a hollow waveguide. The hollow waveguide is curved into the channel and works as a gas absorption cell as well as a transmission medium for mid-infrared light. Owing to the low loss property of the hollow waveguide, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was improved for the sensing system. A polycarbonate (PC) base tube was used to obtain flexibility in the fabrication of the hollow waveguide. A silver (Ag) layer and a silver iodide (AgI) layer were inner-coated to ensure a low loss property at the fingerprint wavelength of methane gas. A sensing system was established using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), an external detector, and an eHWG. Experimental investigations were carried on the sensing performance of eHWGs with various channel shapes. Comparison studies were made on eHWGs embedded with Ag-coated or Ag- and AgI-coated hollow waveguides. The Ag- and AgI-coated hollow waveguides with inner diameters of 0.7, 1.4, and 2.0 mm were used in the eHWGs. The large bore waveguide had low loss but high bending additional loss. The large bore waveguide had a low detection limit due to high coupling efficiency with the light source. A limit of detection (LOD) as low as 2.7 ppm was attained for the system using the eHWG with the long and large bore waveguide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infrared Spectroscopy and Sensors)
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