Special Issue "Health-Promoting Compounds in Cereal Grains"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Grain".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Juha-Matti Pihlava
Website
Guest Editor
Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Finland
Interests: bioactive compounds; phenolic compounds; cereals; pseudocereals; oil seeds; hop; foods; beer; feeds
Dr. Veli Hietaniemi
Website
Guest Editor
Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Finland
Interests: mycotoxins; cereals; oats; extrusion; foods; foodstuffs; feeds; side-streams; risk prediction; risk management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Whole grain cereals are an important source of dietary fiber in our diet. Besides the favorable action of fiber on gut health, dietary fiber copassengers—such as minerals and trace elements, certain vitamins, phytosterols, phenolic compounds and peptides—can also make positive contribution to human health. Most of the nutrients and bioactive compounds in cereals are located in the outer layers of the grain, and can be lost during grain refining processes. While in many cases food processing techniques tend to reduce the amount of phytochemicals, the content of e.g. avenanthramides in oats and benzoxazinoids in rye and wheat, can be increased considerably by germination or malting. On the other hand, processing can also make those phytochemicals that are tightly bound to the cell wall matrix more bioavailable in the gastrointestinal tract.

There is a growing consumer interest in ancient grains, cereal landraces and pseudocereals, which are often considered to be healthier choices over traditional cereals. However, the scientific proof for this is very limited. Various factors, such as cultivar, location and weather, can affect the content of nutrients and bioactive compounds in grains.

Dr. Juha-Matti Pihlava
Dr. Veli Hietaniemi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cereals
  • Ancient grains
  • Pseudocereals
  • Cultivars
  • Phytochemicals
  • Antioxidativity
  • Food processing
  • Food

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Hypolipidemic and Hypoglycaemic Effect of Wholemeal Bread with Amaranth (Amaranthus dubius Mart. ex Thell.) on Sprague Dawley Rats
Foods 2020, 9(6), 707; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060707 - 01 Jun 2020
Abstract
The effect of consuming breads made with wheat flour and Amaranth (Amaranthus dubius Mart. ex Thell.) wholemeal flour on Sprague Dawley rats with hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia induced through feeding was studied. Four diets were provided: control (CD: Ratarina®), commercial bread [...] Read more.
The effect of consuming breads made with wheat flour and Amaranth (Amaranthus dubius Mart. ex Thell.) wholemeal flour on Sprague Dawley rats with hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia induced through feeding was studied. Four diets were provided: control (CD: Ratarina®), commercial bread (CBD), bread with 100 g·kg−1 (ABD10) and 200 g·kg−1 (ABD20) amaranth flour. Zoometric and blood chemistry parameters were measured before and after consuming the diets. A completely random factorial design of 2 × 4 × 2 was used. The factors were blood lipids and glucose level (normal, N and elevated, E), diet (CD, CBD, ABD10 and ABD20) and sex (female, F and male, M). The rats consuming ABD10 and ABD20 diets presented the lowest glucose values, although with no differences (p > 0.05) between the groups of elevated blood lipids and glucose rats (E). Triglyceride concentrations decreased in ABD10 and ABD20 treatments in comparison with CD, elevated blood lipids and glucose (E) rats, while ABD10 rats showed lower total cholesterol level than normal (N) rats. The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol values increased in the ABD10 and ABD20 groups (p < 0.05), while it did lower for very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and cardiac risk index (p < 0.05). In ABD10 and ABD20 treatments, the abdominal circumference decreased in both sexes (p < 0.05) between weeks 23 and 31. In conclusion, consumption of bread with amaranth improved lipid profiles of rats and could help to prevent metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Promoting Compounds in Cereal Grains)
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Open AccessArticle
Process-Structure-Function in Association with the Main Bioactive of Black Rice Flour Sieving Fractions
Foods 2019, 8(4), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8040131 - 18 Apr 2019
Abstract
The aim of this work was to advance knowledge on the potential use of black rice different sieving fractions for various functional applications, through proximate analysis, thermal degradation kinetics of phytochemical and characterization of the thermal behavior of the main proteins, from the [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to advance knowledge on the potential use of black rice different sieving fractions for various functional applications, through proximate analysis, thermal degradation kinetics of phytochemical and characterization of the thermal behavior of the main proteins, from the perspectives of their use as a food ingredient. The results indicated that the thermal degradation of phytochemicals followed a first-order reaction kinetics for all the tested fractions. The temperature-dependent degradation was adequately modeled according to the Arrhenius equation. The calculated activation energies (Ea) and k values were different among the four studied parameters. The kinetic parameters depended on the grinding and sieving degree, the anthocyanins being the most thermolabile compounds, thus affecting the antioxidant activity. Three protein fractions were identified by electrophoresis with different molecular weight, such as albumin, globulin, and glutelin. The fluorescence spectroscopy experiments revealed the sequential character of the heat-induced conformational changes, different molecular events being suggested, such as folding in the lower temperature range and unfolding at higher temperature. The significance of the study is evidenced by the need to identify and advance the process-structure-function relationships for various biologically active compounds from the perspective of obtaining food or ingredients nutritionally optimized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Promoting Compounds in Cereal Grains)
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