Application of Green Antibacterial Packaging Materials in Food Industry

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2024) | Viewed by 1282

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Ciência de Alimentos, Universidade Federal Do Rio Grande Do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Interests: bioactive compounds; natural antimicrobials; nanotechnology; food safety; food microbiology; essencial oils; encapsulation; active packaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The food industry needs to ensure the maintenance of food safety and quality from production to consumption. During the various stages of food processing, contamination with spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms may occur, resulting from contact with a contaminated surface, as well as from the lack of ideal hygienic-sanitary standards when handling food. The food’s nutritional composition and high water activity are also key factors for microbial development. In this context, developing forms of preservation that are efficient and economical is a great challenge for the food industry. Considering the growing consumer demand for ready-to-eat foods, with minimal added preservatives and organoleptic characteristics of fresh products, there is a great interest in the development of new technologies and packaging materials. Traditional plastic packaging has a low cost and adequate structural properties, but its diverse composition and non-renewable source make the recycling process difficult, directly contributing to environmental pollution. Aiming to help maintain food safety and quality, as well as reduce or replace synthetic preservatives added to food, the development of green antibacterial packaging materials can be a very interesting alternative. In this sense, several green antibacterials can be evaluated, such as bacteriocins, essential oils and their constituents and chitosan, among others. In addition, the way in which these antibacterials are incorporated into packaging can vary, from the direct application of the free antimicrobial (in solution) to nanoencapsulation. Nanoencapsulation is a technique in which an encapsulating agent traps an active substance in a nanometer-sized vesicle. The most studied nanomaterials for applications in food packaging are metallic nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanoliposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. A green antibacterial packaging material is supposed to provide improved biocompatibility, biodegradability, physical performance and barrier properties and an eco-friendly and antimicrobial nature, thereby increasing the food safety, shelf life, and freshness of the material packed inside it.

We are pleased to invite you to submit your original research articles or reviews to this Special Issue. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for the publication of valuable articles related to the application of green antibacterial packaging materials in the food industry.

Dr. Patrícia Da Silva Malheiros
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • active packaging
  • natural antimicrobials
  • essencial oils
  • bacteriocin
  • food safety
  • food quality
  • nanotechnology
  • packaging materials
  • antibacterial

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 2819 KiB  
Article
Active Films of Cassava Starch Incorporated with Carvacrol Nanocapsules
by Aline Krümmel, Carlos Henrique Pagno and Patrícia da Silva Malheiros
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1141; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081141 - 9 Apr 2024
Viewed by 985
Abstract
The synthesis of active films with natural antimicrobials from renewable sources offers an alternative to conventional non-biodegradable packaging and synthetic additives. This study aimed to develop cassava starch films with antimicrobial activity by incorporating either free carvacrol or chia mucilage nanocapsules loaded with [...] Read more.
The synthesis of active films with natural antimicrobials from renewable sources offers an alternative to conventional non-biodegradable packaging and synthetic additives. This study aimed to develop cassava starch films with antimicrobial activity by incorporating either free carvacrol or chia mucilage nanocapsules loaded with carvacrol (CMNC) and assess their impact on the physical, mechanical, and barrier properties of the films, as well as their efficacy against foodborne pathogens. The addition of free carvacrol led to a reduction in mechanical properties due to its hydrophobic nature and limited interaction with the polymeric matrix. Conversely, CMNC enhanced elongation at break and reduced light transmission, with a more uniform distribution in the polymeric matrix. Films containing 8% carvacrol exhibited inhibitory effects against Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, further potentiated when encapsulated in chia mucilage nanocapsules. These findings suggest that such films hold promise as active packaging materials to inhibit bacterial growth, ensuring food safety and extending shelf life. Full article
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