Novel Technologies to Improve the Nutritional Properties of Food

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 May 2024 | Viewed by 3597

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yuhuan Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Resources, Engineering Research Center for Biomass Conversion, Nanchang University, Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330047, China
Interests: food processing; biofunctional activity; food fermentation; microalgae food; functional food
Dr. Leipeng Cao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Engineering Research Center for Biomass Conversion, Nanchang University, Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330047, China
Interests: food processing; extraction; biofunctional activity; nutritional properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the improvement of consumer's living levels, the nutritions, freshness, and biofunctional activity of food have attracted great attention. However, the texture, flavor and appearance of food are adversely affected by traditional processing (thermal processing, freezing, etc.), which eventually leads to the deterioration of its nutritional compounds (protein, peptide, polysaccharide, fatty acid, etc.) and biofunctional activity. In recent years, in order to overcome the limitations of traditional processing, non-thermal food processing (ultrasonic, cold plasma, pulse electric field, etc.) has begun to flourish, which has improved the appearance and biofunctional activity of food. Therefore, we invite scientists to contribute research on alternative emerging processing technologies for the food industry to improve its nutritional quality and functional activity.

Functional carbohydrates are used in the food and livestock industries because they are beneficial to human and animal health. Therefore, we aim to verify and elaborate on the functions and mechanisms of carbohydrates  in order to better develop functional products; one of the hot topics in this Special Issue will be how to adopt gentle processing techniques to obtain functional oligosaccharides with biodiversity from a wide range of food raw materials.

Prof. Dr. Yuhuan Liu
Dr. Leipeng Cao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional activity
  • non-thermal processing
  • nutritional quality
  • traditional processing
  • emerging processing technologies
  • microalgae food
  • functional oligosaccharides
  • biodiversity
  • intestinal microbiota

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

19 pages, 1632 KiB  
Review
Research Progress in Modifications, Bioactivities, and Applications of Medicine and Food Homologous Plant Starch
Foods 2024, 13(4), 558; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040558 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 483
Abstract
Starchy foods are an essential part of people’s daily diet. Starch is the primary substance used by plants to store carbohydrates, and it is the primary source of energy for humans and animals. In China, a variety of plants, including edible medicinal plants, [...] Read more.
Starchy foods are an essential part of people’s daily diet. Starch is the primary substance used by plants to store carbohydrates, and it is the primary source of energy for humans and animals. In China, a variety of plants, including edible medicinal plants, such as Pueraria root, yam tuber and coix seed, are rich in starch. However, limited by their inherent properties, kudzu starch and other starches are not suitable for the modern food industry. Natural starch is frequently altered by physical, chemical, or biological means to give it superior qualities to natural starch as it frequently cannot satisfy the demands of industrial manufacturing. Therefore, the deep processing market of modified starch and its products has a great potential. This paper reviews the modification methods which can provide excellent functional, rheological, and processing characteristics for these starches that can be used to improve the physical and chemical properties, texture properties, and edible qualities. This will provide a comprehensive reference for the modification and application of starch from medicinal and edible plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Technologies to Improve the Nutritional Properties of Food)
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27 pages, 717 KiB  
Review
Significance of Fermentation in Plant-Based Meat Analogs: A Critical Review of Nutrition, and Safety-Related Aspects
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3222; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173222 - 27 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2725
Abstract
Plant-based meat analogs have been shown to cause less harm for both human health and the environment compared to real meat, especially processed meat. However, the intense pressure to enhance the sensory qualities of plant-based meat alternatives has caused their nutritional and safety [...] Read more.
Plant-based meat analogs have been shown to cause less harm for both human health and the environment compared to real meat, especially processed meat. However, the intense pressure to enhance the sensory qualities of plant-based meat alternatives has caused their nutritional and safety aspects to be overlooked. This paper reviews our current understanding of the nutrition and safety behind plant-based meat alternatives, proposing fermentation as a potential way of overcoming limitations in these aspects. Plant protein blends, fortification, and preservatives have been the main methods for enhancing the nutritional content and stability of plant-based meat alternatives, but concerns that include safety, nutrient deficiencies, low digestibility, high allergenicity, and high costs have been raised in their use. Fermentation with microorganisms such as Bacillus subtilis, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum, Neurospora intermedia, and Rhizopus oryzae improves digestibility and reduces allergenicity and antinutritive factors more effectively. At the same time, microbial metabolites can boost the final product’s safety, nutrition, and sensory quality, although some concerns regarding their toxicity remain. Designing a single starter culture or microbial consortium for plant-based meat alternatives can be a novel solution for advancing the health benefits of the final product while still fulfilling the demands of an expanding and sustainable economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Technologies to Improve the Nutritional Properties of Food)
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