Special Issue "Advances in Environmental Engineering II"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Adriana Estokova
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Material Engineering, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Kosice, Slovakia
Interests: environmental evaluation of materials; durability of materials; LCA
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Magdalena Balintova
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Kosice, Vysokoskolska 4, Kosice 042 00, Slovakia
Interests: environmental engineering; waste water treatment; water and sediment quality; remediation methods; heavy metals removal; soil protection
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental engineering applies scientific and engineering principles to minimize the adverse affects of human activities on our environment. Its role is to protect and improve the quality of the natural environment to provide sustainable conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony to support present and future generations. This Special Issue invites research papers aimed at a wide range of environmental issues: Air quality and protection, water and wastewater management, water and sediment pollution control and remediation, soil degradation, conservation and remediation, waste management, landscape management, environmental assessment of human activities, LCA, indoor environment, environmental management, and environmental and circular economy. Contributions should include novel and significant knowledge, scientific results and advanced applications in the field of environmental engineering. This Special Issue provides an integrated view of the trends in solving the problems associated with the achievement of sustainability.

Prof. Dr. Adriana Estokova
Prof. Dr. Magdalena Balintova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • air protection
  • indoor air quality
  • water and wastewater management
  • sediment pollution control
  • soil remediation
  • waste management
  • landscape management
  • environmental impacts of buildings and materials
  • LCA
  • environmental management, environmental economy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Visual Comfort Assessment in an Industrial Environment: A Case Study
Environments 2019, 6(5), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6050054 - 23 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Air, water, soil, and light are important factors in the environment. Light is the only elementary part of life that has become an almost irreplaceable part of life. Because man is more connected with the interior, the task is to ensure that natural [...] Read more.
Air, water, soil, and light are important factors in the environment. Light is the only elementary part of life that has become an almost irreplaceable part of life. Because man is more connected with the interior, the task is to ensure that natural daylight in the interior is as high as possible. Industrial lighting is currently at a level that in many cases does not meet the requirements of legislation and standards. Optimal environmental conditions depend on the purpose for which the environment is intended. Since toplighting is largely involved in the overall lighting climate, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the visual comfort in a selected industrial hall with two types of glazing at the saddle skylight. In the study, measured values in the hall were used as boundary conditions in the simulation program Radiance The program evaluated the visual comfort for two types of sky by the Guth VCP method. The results show that the use of diffuse glazing instead of simple wire glazing reduces the brightness and glare levels, but that people’s satisfaction with visual comfort is greater with wire glazing. Furthermore, the model of the hall can be used to calculate light conditions for other types of arches as well as to compare other types of skylights. An alternative to diffusing glazing could also be verified for side windows. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Engineering II)
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Open AccessArticle
Carbon Footprint and Water Footprint of Electric Vehicles and Batteries Charging in View of Various Sources of Power Supply in the Czech Republic
Environments 2019, 6(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6030038 - 26 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In the light of recent developments regarding electric vehicle market share, we assess the carbon footprint and water footprint of electric vehicles and provide a comparative analysis of energy use from the grid to charge electric vehicle batteries in the Czech Republic. The [...] Read more.
In the light of recent developments regarding electric vehicle market share, we assess the carbon footprint and water footprint of electric vehicles and provide a comparative analysis of energy use from the grid to charge electric vehicle batteries in the Czech Republic. The analysis builds on the electricity generation forecast for the Czech Republic for 2015–2050. The impact of different sources of electricity supply on carbon and water footprints were analyzed based on electricity generation by source for the period. Within the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), the carbon footprint was calculated using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) method, while the water footprint was determined by the Water Scarcity method. The computational LCA model was provided by the SimaPro v. 8.5 package with the Ecoinvent v. 3 database. The functional unit of study was running an electric vehicle over 100 km. The system boundary covered an electric vehicle life cycle from cradle to grave. For the analysis, we chose a vehicle powered by a lithium-ion battery with assumed consumption 19.9 kWh/100 km. The results show that electricity generated to charge electric vehicle batteries is the main determinant of carbon and water footprints related to electric vehicles in the Czech Republic. Another important factor is passenger car production. Nuclear power is the main determinant of the water footprint for the current and future electric vehicle charging, while, currently, lignite and hard coal are the main determinants of carbon footprint. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Engineering II)
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