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Special Issue "Wireless Sensor Networks, Internet of Things and Smart Residential"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018) | Viewed by 4901

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Subhas Mukhopadhyay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
Interests: sensors and sensing technology; instrumentation; wireless sensor networks; Internet of Things; mechatronics and robotics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Boby George
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Madras 600036, Tamil Nadu, India
Interests: sensors; instrumentation; interfacing circuits; sensors for industrial applications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Nagender Kumar Suryadevara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Computer and Information Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Telangana 500046, India
Interests: wireless sensor networks; Internet of Things; time series data mining
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are inviting submissions to a Special Issue of Energies entitled “WSN, IoT and Smart Residential Systems”

It is almost impossible to visualize any large practical smart system without the Internet of Things (IoT) and, of course, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). IoT helps engineers to design and develop smart systems that perform extremely well compared to conventional ones, in terms of functionality, ease of realization, cost, scalability, reconfigurability and reliability. WSNs are key central building blocks in the smart system that provides a reliable information channel for sensing and actuation at the required locations of the system at a low cost. Internet of Things-empowered WSNs are ordinarily portrayed by their capacity to remotely and unequivocally sense particular information, cross examining it and controlling the way it suits the application destinations and objectives. This empowers creative models of IoT applications that incorporate omnipresent, remote, individual social security checking, indoor and urban air quality mapping and monitoring, wellbeing monitoring of individuals in residences, and a number of extremely useful smart city applications.

For WSNs, the energy required to power the modules remains the primary difficulty that hampers the self-governing and unending operation of WSN/IoT frameworks. Energy control proficiency calculations are always being researched for specific applications of WSNs. Energy-Harvesting WSNs (EHWSNs) are promising and are expected to expand the scale of deployment of WSNs possible now. EHWSNs, regardless of whether they are completely self-sufficient or are upheld by batteries, are powered by energy harvesters that scavenge energy from the environment where they are located.

The main objective of this Special Issue is to provide a common platform for researchers in IoT, WSN and Smart Residential System to share their high-quality research and outcomes, and disseminate them to the rest of the world. The topics include novel designs, developments and management of smart systems with a focus on residential systems. The systems include energy systems, smart water supply systems, air and water quality monitoring systems, parking systems, health monitoring systems and smart waste management systems. In addition to these, notable advancements in the performance of WSN and IoT are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Subhas Mukhopadhyay
Prof. Dr. Boby George
Prof. Dr. Nagender Kumar Suryadevara

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • smart home
  • smart environment
  • smart building
  • smart residential
  • Internet of Things-empowered WSNs
  • smart devices
  • energy-harvested WSN
  • green computing
  • power efficiency for wireless, mobile and networks
  • green data communication network architecture
  • measurements and models for energy consumption of wireless networks
  • all security aspects applicable to WSNs, EH-WSNs and IoTs
  • smart systems designed and evaluated for a Residential Scenario.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Thermal Comfort, Energy and Cost Impacts of PMV Control Considering Individual Metabolic Rate Variations in Residential Building
Energies 2018, 11(7), 1767; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11071767 - 05 Jul 2018
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2548
Abstract
To date, most of the indoor environment control is based on the dry-bulb air temperature, which is one of the simplified control methods having the limitation to truly represent the thermal comfort of individual occupants. A variety of factors affect the thermal comfort [...] Read more.
To date, most of the indoor environment control is based on the dry-bulb air temperature, which is one of the simplified control methods having the limitation to truly represent the thermal comfort of individual occupants. A variety of factors affect the thermal comfort such as dry-bulb air temperature, humidity, air movement, radiation, clothing insulation, and metabolic activity level. In this circumstance, this study investigated the effects of considering hourly metabolic rate variations for predicted mean vote (PMV) control on the actual thermal load, energy usage, and life cycle cost (LCC). The case adopting PMV control taking the hourly metabolic rate into account was comparatively analyzed against the conventional dry-bulb air temperature control, using a detailed simulation technique after the validation process. As a result, when the activity state of the occupant is house cleaning in the summer, the indoor temperature decreases rapidly due to the high amount of activity. It requires a temperature that is 11.7 °C and 9.7 °C lower than the conventional dry-bulb air temperature control method, respectively, and generally forms a higher indoor air temperature than the conventional control method after 7 p.m. This means the difference in temperature to satisfy the comfort of the occupant according to the amount of activity, and during winter as opposed to summer, was found to form a lower indoor air temperature than the conventional temperature control. In case of annual boiler gas consumption, PMV control showed 7.3% less energy consumption than the dry-bulb air temperature control and showed 28.8% less energy consumption than the dry-bulb air temperature control for annual cooling electricity consumption. Considering the cooling and heating energy reduction rate and the initial installation cost of measuring equipment for real-time metabolic rate and PMV measurement, a payback period of approximately 4.15 years was required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Sensor Networks, Internet of Things and Smart Residential)
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Article
A Reconfigurable Mesh-Ring Topology for Bluetooth Sensor Networks
Energies 2018, 11(5), 1163; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051163 - 07 May 2018
Viewed by 1922
Abstract
In this paper, a Reconfigurable Mesh-Ring (RMR) algorithm is proposed for Bluetooth sensor networks. The algorithm is designed in three stages to determine the optimal configuration of the mesh-ring network. Firstly, a designated root advertises and discovers its neighboring nodes. Secondly, a scatternet [...] Read more.
In this paper, a Reconfigurable Mesh-Ring (RMR) algorithm is proposed for Bluetooth sensor networks. The algorithm is designed in three stages to determine the optimal configuration of the mesh-ring network. Firstly, a designated root advertises and discovers its neighboring nodes. Secondly, a scatternet criterion is built to compute the minimum number of piconets and distributes the connection information for piconet and scatternet. Finally, a peak-search method is designed to determine the optimal mesh-ring configuration for various sizes of networks. To maximize the network capacity, the research problem is formulated by determining the best connectivity of available mesh links. During the formation and maintenance phases, three possible configurations (including piconet, scatternet, and hybrid) are examined to determine the optimal placement of mesh links. The peak-search method is a systematic approach, and is implemented by three functional blocks: the topology formation block generates the mesh-ring topology, the routing efficiency block computes the routing performance, and the optimum decision block introduces a decision-making criterion to determine the optimum number of mesh links. Simulation results demonstrate that the optimal mesh-ring configuration can be determined and that the scatternet case achieves better overall performance than the other two configurations. The RMR topology also outperforms the conventional ring-based and cluster-based mesh methods in terms of throughput performance for Bluetooth configurable networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Sensor Networks, Internet of Things and Smart Residential)
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