Determinants of Cancer: Implications into the Quality of Life and Daily Life Activities

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2024) | Viewed by 3300

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The University School of Nursing and Physiotherapy, Universidad Pontificia Comillas, 28015 Madrid, Spain
Interests: clinical research and evidence-based practice; clinical trials; wellbeing; palliative care; coping strategies; patient and professional engagement; clinical nursing; nursing education; advanced practice nursing; community cares
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Saint John of God School of Nursing and Physical Therapy, Universidad Pontificia Comillas, Madrid, Spain
Interests: cancer and exercise; health and exercise; functional rehabilitation; education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The determinants of health involved in prevention and those involved in the follow-up of cancer patients are key to determining aspects of quality of life and the ability of cancer patients to carry out the various activities of daily life.

From the point of view of prevention, acting on three principal factors—toxic habits, diet, and physical activity, and many more to avoid the development of an oncological diagnosis is essential.

This call for papers is based on these two pillars: research that deals with the development of prevention programs and that is focused on these three management examples, and research that works actively in the management of the patient concerning implementing and improving their quality of life, as well as improving their ability to carry out daily life activities.

Dr. Julio C. de la Torre-Montero
Dr. Soraya Casla
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • health
  • cancer
  • quality of life
  • daily activities
  • lifestyles

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 1233 KiB  
Article
Biofeedback-Based Proprioceptive Training to Improve Functional Prerequisites of Dragon Boating in Breast Cancer Survivors
by Giuditta Carretti, Angela Dabraio, Mirko Manetti and Mirca Marini
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2024, 14(5), 1351-1368; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe14050089 - 11 May 2024
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Abstract
Breast cancer (BC)-related sequelae drastically impact the psychophysical functioning and quality of life of affected women. Adapted physical activity (APA) has proved to effectively counteract these impairments in a non-medicalized framework. In particular, dragon boats are able to promote body functionality, social interaction, [...] Read more.
Breast cancer (BC)-related sequelae drastically impact the psychophysical functioning and quality of life of affected women. Adapted physical activity (APA) has proved to effectively counteract these impairments in a non-medicalized framework. In particular, dragon boats are able to promote body functionality, social interaction, and quality of life in BC survivors, but the literature on specific motor gestures is scarce and practice is still based more on a re-educative perspective than a performative one. In this context, the present longitudinal study investigated the benefits of an adapted biofeedback-based sensorimotor training intervention on upper body functionality in a team of dragon ladies. The 8-week intervention was conceived as integrated dry workout sessions led by an APA kinesiologist and applied a novel sensorized proprioceptive device, such as a Libra board. Post-protocol evaluation revealed a significant improvement in bilateral upper limb mobility, core endurance, and trunk stability along with a distress decrease and quality of life enhancement through validated assessment tools. Our findings suggest that integrating biofeedback-based workout sessions can effectively promote upper body functionality in BC survivors practicing dragon boating. Furthermore, our innovative approach could help spread methodological hints able to boost exercise adherence in this target population, thus counteracting cancer recurrence while promoting overall well-being. Full article
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12 pages, 301 KiB  
Article
Self-Esteem and Coping Strategies in Adolescent Cancer Patients during the Period of Illness and Follow-Up
by Diego José Sáez Rodríguez, Juan Manuel Ortigosa Quiles, Antonio Riquelme Marin and Raquel Suriá Martínez
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2024, 14(5), 1128-1139; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe14050074 - 24 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The importance of self-esteem during the course of oncological illness has been well-documented by some previous studies. However, data assessing its association with various coping strategies, especially considering the period of illness, are still scarce. The objective of this study is to analyze [...] Read more.
The importance of self-esteem during the course of oncological illness has been well-documented by some previous studies. However, data assessing its association with various coping strategies, especially considering the period of illness, are still scarce. The objective of this study is to analyze the differences in coping strategies among oncological adolescents, taking into account their self-esteem, illness period, age, and sex. A total of 201 oncological patients between the ages of 12 and 17 from three different Spanish cities were included in this study. All of them were asked to answer a tailored questionnaire, encompassing information about age, sex, and illness period. Additionally, the coping strategies were measured using the ACS scale, while self-esteem was evaluated using the SENA questionnaire. The results demonstrated that male adolescents and older individuals exhibited higher levels of self-esteem. The main coping strategies associated with higher self-esteem were “ignore the problem”, “focus on positive”, “physical recreation”, and “wishful thinking” both during the treatment and the follow-up phases. We conclude that higher self-esteem is associated with some of the coping strategies such as “focus on positive”, “ignore the problem”, and “wishful thinking”. Sociodemographic variables influence the relationship between self-esteem and coping strategies, but no differences were found regarding the period of illness. Full article
12 pages, 968 KiB  
Article
Challenges of Pharyngeal Cancer Screening in Lower-Income Countries during Economic and Social Transitions: A Population-Based Analysis
by Andreea M. Kis, Claudia G. Watz, Alexandru C. Motofelea, Sorin Chiriac, Marioara Poenaru, Cristina A. Dehelean, Claudia Borza and Ioana Ionita
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(10), 2226-2237; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13100157 - 10 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Background and Objectives: The rate of head and neck cancer (HNC) is expected to increase by 30% by 2030. However, there are many similarities between the symptomatology of a benign and a malign diagnosis; thus, a protocol for conducting a full head and [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: The rate of head and neck cancer (HNC) is expected to increase by 30% by 2030. However, there are many similarities between the symptomatology of a benign and a malign diagnosis; thus, a protocol for conducting a full head and neck examination is of high importance since the absence of adenopathy does not exclude a malignant diagnosis and also a favorable prognosis. Material and methods: The current study presents a retrospective study on 515 adult patients who underwent a biopsy for possible head and neck tumor pathology. Results: The patients identified with cancer were older than the rest of the group, with a higher developing trend in men than in women. However, the top 10 symptomatology patterns were identical in the malign and benign groups, meaning that new HNC may be missed due to the common symptomatology between benign and malign outcomes. Conclusions: The importance of a full ear, nose, and throat (ENT) examination may be of significant relevance for a proper diagnosis that can improve the overall prognosis of a patient with cancer. The absence of routine screening tests and screening guidelines for oral and pharyngeal cancers represents a significant barrier to secondary HNC prevention. Full article
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