Special Issue "Visible Learning – What’s next? A Decade after An Educational Milestone"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Klaus Zierer

Ordinarius für Schulpädagogik, Universität Augsburg, Universitätsstraße 10, 86159 Augsburg, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: instruction; learning; teaching; visible learning; meta-analyses

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Hardly any other work has been so widely discussed in recent years as John Hattie's Visible Learning.  Times Educational Supplement spoke of this book relating to the Holy Grail was released in 2008, and after ten years it is time to review and re-evaluate this work and its impact. The following questions are of particular interest here:

  • What is special about "Visible Learning" and how can we trace the history of its origins to this day?
  • In retrospect, how can the reception of "Visible Learning" in the scientific community be portrayed?
  • In retrospect, how can the reception of "Visible Learning" be presented in practice?
  • In which are as of pedagogy has "Visible Learning" already brought about sustainable changes?
  • What are the core messages from "Visible Learning" that have received little attention so far?
  • What criticism was made of "Visible Learning" – which criticism was justified and which criticism was unjustified?
  • What is the future of a synthesis of meta-analysis?

The Special Issue of Education Science addresses these questions and is the first international journal to dedicate its own issue to the work of John Hattie. 

Prof. Dr. Klaus Zierer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Implementing High-Leverage Influences from the Visible Learning Synthesis: Six Supporting Conditions
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040215
Received: 16 November 2018 / Revised: 5 December 2018 / Accepted: 6 December 2018 / Published: 11 December 2018
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Abstract
Even though there is a plethora of research that can be used by educators to inform their practice, the deep implementation of evidence-based strategies remains unrealized in many schools and classrooms. The question we set out to answer was: What conditions help encourage
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Even though there is a plethora of research that can be used by educators to inform their practice, the deep implementation of evidence-based strategies remains unrealized in many schools and classrooms. The question we set out to answer was: What conditions help encourage educators to implement and adapt evidence from the Visible Learning synthesis when they encounter it? We examined two examples of the reception of the Visible Learning research in schools and identified the following six key conditions that helped foster the translation of the Visible Learning research into classroom practice in ways that demonstrated measurable impact on student learning: (1) The presence of a learning methodology; (2) clear examples of how to apply the strategies; (3) a ‘knowledgeable other’ to help assist educators in processing the research; (4) a supportive organizational environment; (5) the recognition of educators as agents of influence, and (6) the monitoring and adjustment of implementation strategies. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Teacher Mindframes from an Educational Science Perspective
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040209
Received: 29 October 2018 / Revised: 28 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 30 November 2018
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Abstract
In this article, we describe the philosophical and the scientific background of teacher mindframes and we argue that educational professionalism consists not only of ability and knowledge (competence), but also of will and judgement (attitudes). To back up our argument, we present the
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In this article, we describe the philosophical and the scientific background of teacher mindframes and we argue that educational professionalism consists not only of ability and knowledge (competence), but also of will and judgement (attitudes). To back up our argument, we present the results of our current research project on this matter. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Long View of Visible Learning’s Impact
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040174
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 14 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
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Abstract
In this article, we address the common criticisms of the Visible Learning research and offer a long-term view of the potential presented with this body of knowledge. We contextualize our view with some experiences in a high school that is focused on improving
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In this article, we address the common criticisms of the Visible Learning research and offer a long-term view of the potential presented with this body of knowledge. We contextualize our view with some experiences in a high school that is focused on improving student learning. Full article

Other

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Open AccessCommentary Using the Visible Learning Research to Influence Collaborative Leadership
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040219
Received: 9 October 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 17 December 2018
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Abstract
John Hattie’s Visible Learning research has been read, dissected, and implemented by educators and leaders around the world. Whether it’s the effect sizes or the influences that challenge the thinking of the status quo, the Visible Learning research has taken a place in
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John Hattie’s Visible Learning research has been read, dissected, and implemented by educators and leaders around the world. Whether it’s the effect sizes or the influences that challenge the thinking of the status quo, the Visible Learning research has taken a place in many educational conversations. Over the last three years, the author of this paper has been researching and implementing the Visible Learning research, and used some of the findings to create a leadership workshop that focused on six of the influences that Hattie has been studying for years. The point of using the six influences he focused on was that based on the author’s knowledge of leadership through his experience as a teacher and building leader, as well as his understanding and research around school climate, there were six areas that all leaders should understand deeply if they are to have a positive impact on student learning. Full article
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