Special Issue "Engineering Education and Technological / Professional Learning"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Clara Viegas

Polythecnic of Porto, School of Engineering, Physics Department / CIETI - Center for Innovation in Engineering and Industrial Technology, Porto, 4200-072, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: engineering education; physics didactics; science and technological education research; teacher mediation; teaching practices; teacher professional development; remote labs learning outcomes
Guest Editor
Dr. Arcelina Marques

Polythecnic of Porto, School of Engineering, Physics Department / CIETI - Center for Innovation in Engineering and Industrial Technology, Porto, 4200-072, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: engineering education; remote labs; STEM education
Guest Editor
Dr. Gustavo Alves

Polythecnic of Porto, School of Engineering, Electrotechnics Department / CIETI - Center for Innovation in Engineering and Industrial Technology, Porto, 4200-072, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: engineering education; remote labs; STEM education
Guest Editor
Dr. Francisco José García-Peñalvo

Computer Science Department. Research Institute for Educational Sciences. GRIAL Research Group. University of Salamanca. Faculty of Sciences, Plaza de los Caídos S/N, 37008, Salamanca, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: STEM; computational thinking

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The focus of this Special Issue is to enhance the discussion around Science and Engineering Education, and, in particular, technology and professional learning. This Special Issue is especially concerned with how student academic education prepares them for demanding professions. It is dedicated to openly discuss how young engineers are addressing these new challenges while adapting to their professional environments. How can they make a difference in the actual and demanding professional world? Which major difficulties do employers see in them? What do senior engineers seek and what is most value for a young professional? How can teachers and the academic background help students to stand out? In sum, what can we learn from these young professionals, from their employers, and from their teachers?

In the 21st century, students face a challenging demand: They are expected to have the best scientific expertise, but also highly-developed social skills and qualities like teamwork, creativity, communication and leadership. Even though students should be prepared over their academic education, there is still a gap between academic life and professional life. This gap might have several origins, namely students’ lack of maturity or intrinsic motivation to learn, excessive traditional classrooms practices, lack of opportunities for students to envisage contextualized professional practices, among others. 

The purpose of this Special Issue is to help identify good practices and/or particular concerns that young engineers or their employees feel need improvement. In order to discuss this, different perspectives are welcome, including the viewpoint of young engineers, educators, tutors and employers. On the other hand, it would also be most helpful for freshmen students better understand what exactly is expected from them in the real world: What better than CEOs or former students’ thoughts to help students develop the needed intrinsic motivation to learn, solve problems, and become a true engineer?

Engineering education organizations have been addressing new professional challenges, guided by general concerns, such as teamwork abilities, argumentation and persuasion abilities in multiple social contexts, creativity, complexity handling, and leadership or strong work ethics. This stresses the importance of these competencies being worked through college along with communication, scientific/technological expertise, problem-solving or analytical/quantitative skills. Nowadays, it is as important to address scientific expertise as students’ social and professional competencies. Even though both are important, they do not play equal parts in students and teachers minds. Plus, the outcome perspectives from academic and professional worlds can be quite different. Thus, different point of views must be acknowledged and documented.

The need for a better understanding of engineering education in the 21st century is reflected in scientific research, where it is common to encounter big experiences, involving funding or school commitments. However, it is less common to encounter studies that can be applied by any goodwilling teacher. Smaller scaled studies representing better-contextualized teaching, closer to professional demands, can also bring valid insight to this discussion in the scientific community.


Dr. Clara Viegas
Dr. Arcelina Marques
Dr. Gustavo Alves
Dr. Francisco José García-Peñalvo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Engineering Education
  • Engineering Internships
  • Professional Contexts
  • Soft Skills
  • PBL
  • Project Management
  • Engineering Classroom Practices

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Development of Final Projects in Engineering Degrees around an Industry 4.0-Oriented Flexible Manufacturing System: Preliminary Outcomes and Some Initial Considerations
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040214
Received: 8 October 2018 / Revised: 3 December 2018 / Accepted: 4 December 2018 / Published: 9 December 2018
PDF Full-text (3408 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
New paradigms such as the Industry 4.0, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), or industrial cyber-physical systems (ICPSs) have been impacting the manufacturing environment in recent years. Nevertheless, these challenging concepts are also being faced from the educational field: Engineering students must acquire
[...] Read more.
New paradigms such as the Industry 4.0, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), or industrial cyber-physical systems (ICPSs) have been impacting the manufacturing environment in recent years. Nevertheless, these challenging concepts are also being faced from the educational field: Engineering students must acquire knowledge and skills under the view of these frameworks. This paper describes the utilization of an Industry 4.0-oriented flexible manufacturing system (FMS) as an educational tool to develop final projects (FPs) of engineering degrees. A number of scopes are covered by an FMS, such as automation, supervision, instrumentation, communications, and robotics. The utilization of an FMS with educational purposes started in the academic year 2011–2012 and still remains active. Here, the most illustrative FPs are expounded, and successful academic outcomes are reported. In addition, a set of initial considerations based on the experience acquired by the FP tutors is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering Education and Technological / Professional Learning)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Tutorials for Integrating CAD/CAM in Engineering Curricula
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(3), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8030151
Received: 23 August 2018 / Revised: 13 September 2018 / Accepted: 14 September 2018 / Published: 19 September 2018
PDF Full-text (4311 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article addresses the issue of educating engineering students with the knowledge and skills of Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM). In particular, three carefully designed tutorials—cutting tool offsetting, tool-path generation for freeform surfaces, and the integration of advanced machine tools (e.g., hexapod-based machine
[...] Read more.
This article addresses the issue of educating engineering students with the knowledge and skills of Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM). In particular, three carefully designed tutorials—cutting tool offsetting, tool-path generation for freeform surfaces, and the integration of advanced machine tools (e.g., hexapod-based machine tools) with solid modeling—are described. The tutorials help students gain an in-depth understanding of how the CAD/CAM-relevant hardware devices and software packages work in real-life settings. At the same time, the tutorials help students achieve the following educational outcomes: (1) an ability to apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering; (2) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet the desired needs, (3) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems; and (4) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools that are necessary for engineering practice. The tutorials can be modified for incorporating other contemporary issues (e.g., additive manufacturing, reverse engineering, and sustainable manufacturing), which can be delved into as a natural extension of this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering Education and Technological / Professional Learning)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top