Special Issue "Concept Mapping and Education"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. AMM Sharif Ullah
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami 090-8507, Japan
Interests: machining and grinding; Industry 4.0; sustainable manufacturing; product development; 3D printing; intelligent systems; engineering education
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A concept map (or a network of some linguistic expressions) is a human-level representation of an issue. Concept-map-based educational activity ensures meaningful learning, and helps avoid, at the same time, rote learning. It also helps prepare contents for e-learning, as well as, measuring the learning outcomes at the course, program, and (even) institutional levels. Therefore, concept maps have extensively been used in schools, colleges, universities, and professional education. The objective of this Special Issue is to provide an outlet for the finding of our colleagues who are active in concept-map-based educational activities. In particular, this issue solicits manuscripts on (but not limited to) the following topics:

  1. Theoretical foundations of concept mapping
  2. Application of concept mapping in preparing e-learning contents
  3. Application of concept mapping in school education
  4. Application of concept mapping in higher education
  5. Application of concept mapping in professional education
  6. Concept mapping in active learning
  7. Concept mapping in problem-based learning
  8. Concept mapping in project-based learning
  9. Concept mapping in engineering education
  10. ICT-based concept mapping
  11. Concept-map-based distance learning

Dr. AMM Sharif Ullah
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • concept map
  • educational science
  • educational practice
  • meaningful learning

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Concept Map and Knowledge
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10090246 - 15 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 700
Abstract
Based on Piaget’s genetic epistemology, Ausubel developed the assimilation theory of verbal learning [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Concept Mapping and Education)

Research

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Article
Fundamental Issues of Concept Mapping Relevant to Discipline-Based Education: A Perspective of Manufacturing Engineering
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030228 - 29 Aug 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1877
Abstract
This article addresses some fundamental issues of concept mapping relevant to discipline-based education. The focus is on manufacturing knowledge representation from the viewpoints of both human and machine learning. The concept of new-generation manufacturing (Industry 4.0, smart manufacturing, and connected factory) necessitates learning [...] Read more.
This article addresses some fundamental issues of concept mapping relevant to discipline-based education. The focus is on manufacturing knowledge representation from the viewpoints of both human and machine learning. The concept of new-generation manufacturing (Industry 4.0, smart manufacturing, and connected factory) necessitates learning factory (human learning) and human-cyber-physical systems (machine learning). Both learning factory and human-cyber-physical systems require semantic web-embedded dynamic knowledge bases, which are subjected to syntax (machine-to-machine communication), semantics (the meaning of the contents), and pragmatics (the preferences of individuals involved). This article argues that knowledge-aware concept mapping is a solution to create and analyze the semantic web-embedded dynamic knowledge bases for both human and machine learning. Accordingly, this article defines five types of knowledge, namely, analytic a priori knowledge, synthetic a priori knowledge, synthetic a posteriori knowledge, meaningful knowledge, and skeptic knowledge. These types of knowledge help find some rules and guidelines to create and analyze concept maps for the purposes human and machine learning. The presence of these types of knowledge is elucidated using a real-life manufacturing knowledge representation case. Their implications in learning manufacturing knowledge are also described. The outcomes of this article help install knowledge-aware concept maps for discipline-based education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Concept Mapping and Education)
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Article
The Role and Efficacy of Creative Imagination in Concept Formation: A Study of Variables for Children in Primary School
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030175 - 05 Jul 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1765
Abstract
Children’s creative imagination is tested through tasks involving narrative and drawing abilities for participants between the age of 8 and 12 years. The test determines the relative importance of ‘narrative’ against ‘graphic’ imagination in interpretive, problem-solving strategies, and also considers how such distinctive [...] Read more.
Children’s creative imagination is tested through tasks involving narrative and drawing abilities for participants between the age of 8 and 12 years. The test determines the relative importance of ‘narrative’ against ‘graphic’ imagination in interpretive, problem-solving strategies, and also considers how such distinctive functions of the creative imagination could affect ‘general’ creativity of the child learner. Participants were chosen from designated primary schools in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. The test on creativity complements facts from observational methodology in a population of mixed Castilian-speaking children. The name of the test is Prueba de Imaginación Creativa Niños (2008) or ‘Test of Creative Imagination in Children’, the Castilian acronym being PIC-N. It comprised four sub-tests: Three designed to evaluate narrative (verbal) creativity, and one for drawing (i.e., graphic) creativity. The first three ‘exercises’ in the suite indicates (a) fluency, (b) flexibility, and (c) originality in narrative representations, whereas the fourth indexes (d) graphic abilities of the child learner. Results suggest that creative imagination causes variations in specific aspects of creativity, like narrative and graphic improvisation, and also modifies ‘general’ creativity as understood from the perspective of a developmental psychology of learning abilities in growing children within the defined age group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Concept Mapping and Education)
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Article
The Salutogenic Management of Pedagogic Frailty: A Case of Educational Theory Development Using Concept Mapping
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9020157 - 25 Jun 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2282
Abstract
This paper explores the development of educational theory (pedagogic frailty) that has emerged through the application of concept maps to understand teachers’ conceptions of their roles within the complex higher education environment. Within this conceptual paper, pedagogic frailty is reinterpreted using the lens [...] Read more.
This paper explores the development of educational theory (pedagogic frailty) that has emerged through the application of concept maps to understand teachers’ conceptions of their roles within the complex higher education environment. Within this conceptual paper, pedagogic frailty is reinterpreted using the lens offered by the concept of salutogenesis to place the model in a more positive frame that can offer greater utility for university managers. This development parallels changes in the consideration of mental health literacy (MHL) across university campuses and avoids misapplication of a deficit model to the professional enhancement of teaching quality. For a detailed explication of this wider perspective of pedagogic health literacy (PHL), the connections with related and supporting concepts need to be explained. These include ‘assets’, ‘wellness’ and a ‘sense of coherence’. Links between these concepts are introduced here. This reframing of the model has used concept mapping to explore the relationship between two complex ideas—pedagogic frailty and salutogenesis. It emphasizes pedagogic health as a continuum operating between frailty and resilience. Brief implications for academic development are included. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Concept Mapping and Education)
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Article
Uncovering Types of Knowledge in Concept Maps
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9020131 - 13 Jun 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4548
Abstract
Concept maps have been shown to have a positive impact on the quality of student learning in a variety of disciplinary contexts and educational levels from primary school to university by helping students to connect ideas and develop a productive knowledge structure to [...] Read more.
Concept maps have been shown to have a positive impact on the quality of student learning in a variety of disciplinary contexts and educational levels from primary school to university by helping students to connect ideas and develop a productive knowledge structure to support future learning. However, the evaluation of concept maps has always been a contentious issue. Some authors focus on the quantitative assessment of maps, while others prefer a more descriptive determination of map quality. To our knowledge, no previous consideration of concept maps has evaluated the different types of knowledge (e.g., procedural and conceptual) embedded within a concept map, or the ways in which they may interact. In this paper we consider maps using the lens provided by the Legitimation Code Theory (LCT) to analyze concept maps in terms of semantic gravity and semantic density. Weaving between these qualitatively, different knowledges are considered necessary to achieve professional knowledge or expert understanding. Exemplar maps are used as illustrations of the way in which students may navigate their learning towards expertise and how this is manifested in their concept maps. Implications for curriculum design and teaching evaluation are included. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Concept Mapping and Education)
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Article
A Concept Tree of Accounting Theory: (Re)Design for the Curriculum Development
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9020111 - 21 May 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2858
Abstract
This study contributes to both accounting and concept mapping literature through the depiction of a concept tree based on the Accounting Theory curriculum, which has undergone recent and rapid expansion of its knowledge and has hence outgrown the previous limited mapping work. This [...] Read more.
This study contributes to both accounting and concept mapping literature through the depiction of a concept tree based on the Accounting Theory curriculum, which has undergone recent and rapid expansion of its knowledge and has hence outgrown the previous limited mapping work. This tree-shaped concept map not only accounts for a particular mapping approach little studied and scarcely exemplified in literature, but also signifies a creative model that graphically interprets the sophisticated system of accounting theories and concepts as well as their complex interrelationships. In teaching practices, this concept tree has attested a potential to promote curriculum development, as evidenced in sequence and cohesion of topics and by being linked meaningfully to exam design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Concept Mapping and Education)
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