Special Issue "New Technologies in Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 March 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gaetano Isola
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery and Surgical-Medical Specialties, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: periodontitis; oral surgery; oral pathology; oral health-systemic health; bone biology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonino Lo Giudice
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery and Surgical–Medical Specialties, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: orthodontics; pedodontics; digital dentistry; laser; biomaterials.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Digital technologies have been rapidly introduced in dental practices, with many of them based around the capture of images. Digital imaging technologies offer the ability to record, archive, and remotely assess dental conditions and utilize a skill mix in the delivery of field work. Images may be white light or use alternative light sources to help the automation of the detection and quantification of dental lesions. In clinical trials, the use of technologies and basic science innovations enable the increased independence of examiners, multiple examiner scoring, and an archive and audit of activity for regulators and others. The use of more sophisticated statistical techniques using continuous, rather than the more common ordinal, data reduces the subject numbers and duration of such trials. Image archives can also be revisited for secondary outcome assessment with ease, ensuring that the maximum data yield can be achieved from a single study.

Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provides new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This Special Issue will be focused on updating the current knowledge on therapies and biomaterials used in dentistry, with emphasis on the most recent findings and future directions.

We especially welcome interventional and observational studies aimed at improving the knowledge of the effects of new technologies in clinical and basic research trials. Review studies, including those that use conceptual frameworks, for any of the aforementioned topics will also be welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Gaetano Isola
Dr. Antonino Lo Giudice
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Clinical trials
  • Periodontology
  • Digital dentistry
  • Tissue engineering
  • Oral regeneration
  • Oral medicine
  • Orthodontics
  • Oral surgery
  • Oral microbiology
  • Periodontal medicine

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
A Preliminary Study on the Ability of the Trypsin-Like Peptidase Activity Assay Kit to Detect Periodontitis
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030098 - 01 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 982
Abstract
This study aimed to explore whether the Trypsin-Like Peptidase Activity Assay Kit (TLP-AA-Kit), which measures the activity of N-benzoyl-dl-arginine peptidase (trypsin-like peptidase), can be used as a reliable tool for periodontitis detection in population-based surveillance. In total, 105 individuals underwent a [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore whether the Trypsin-Like Peptidase Activity Assay Kit (TLP-AA-Kit), which measures the activity of N-benzoyl-dl-arginine peptidase (trypsin-like peptidase), can be used as a reliable tool for periodontitis detection in population-based surveillance. In total, 105 individuals underwent a full-mouth periodontal examination and provided tongue swabs as specimens for further analyses. The results of the TLP-AA-Kit were scored between 1 and 5; higher scores indicated higher trypsin concentrations. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to evaluate the predictive validity of the TLP-AA-Kit, where the periodontitis case definition provided by the Centers for Disease Control/American Academy of Periodontology served as the reference. Severe and moderate periodontitis were identified in 4.8% and 16.2% of the study population, respectively. The TLP-AA-Kit showed high diagnostic accuracy for severe periodontitis, with an area under the curve of 0.93 (95% confidence interval = 0.88–0.99). However, the diagnostic accuracy of the TLP-AA-Kit for moderate/severe periodontitis was not reliable. While further studies are necessary to validate our results, the results provided herein highlight the potential of the TLP-AA-Kit as a useful tool for the detection of periodontitis, particularly in severe cases, for population-based surveillance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies in Dentistry)
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Article
A New Technique for Direct Fabrication of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Bridge: A Long-Term Clinical Observation
Dent. J. 2020, 8(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8020048 - 10 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1031
Abstract
The use of fiberglass in dentistry has increased due to the improvements in the development of adhesive techniques reducing the cost of treatment and avoiding abutment tooth craving. The present study aims to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the new technique to fabricate [...] Read more.
The use of fiberglass in dentistry has increased due to the improvements in the development of adhesive techniques reducing the cost of treatment and avoiding abutment tooth craving. The present study aims to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the new technique to fabricate a direct fiber-reinforced composite bridge (FRCB) over a long period of time. Twenty-one FRCB were performed with the new direct technique on 21 patients with a mean age of 58.85 years and female predominance in the Faculty of Dentistry of Oviedo (Spain). The framework design releases the embrasures allowing adequate interproximal brushing, avoidance of periodontal disease and interproximal caries. A baseline examination was performed and the patients were examined regularly at six-month intervals (nine years’ follow-up). The restorations were also evaluated by an examiner using parameters to check their stability, longevity and the lack of periodontal disease. The most frequent location was the maxillary premolar region and the purpose of the restorations was to give a definitive bridge in 100% of the patients. Only one total debonding of the prostheses was detected during the observation period at 24 months and three partial adhesive–cohesive veneering composite fractures at the pontic after 60, 72 and 84 months, respectively. Kaplan–Meier was performed to detect the overall survival rate of the restorations at the end of the follow-up. Nine-year survival rates for the FRCB was 95.2%. All the cases had a clinically acceptable periodontal condition and an interproximal absence of caries in the abutment teeth. Currently, this type of restoration allows a minimally invasive aesthetic and is an affordable procedure, being a good alternative to other types of treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies in Dentistry)
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Article
Myofunctional Trainer versus Twin Block in Developing Class II Division I Malocclusion: A Randomized Comparative Clinical Trial
Dent. J. 2020, 8(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8020044 - 07 May 2020
Viewed by 900
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate and compare the dentoalveolar effects of the myofunctional trainer T4KTM versus twin block in children with class II division I malocclusion. Two parallel arm randomized comparative clinical trial was conducted, including twenty healthy children, 9–12 years old, [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate and compare the dentoalveolar effects of the myofunctional trainer T4KTM versus twin block in children with class II division I malocclusion. Two parallel arm randomized comparative clinical trial was conducted, including twenty healthy children, 9–12 years old, showing Angle’s class II division I malocclusion due to mandibular retrusion. Children were randomly assigned into two groups according to the appliance used; Group 1: T4k, and Group II: twin block. Follow-up was done every 4 weeks for 9 months. Postoperative cephalometric X ray, study casts and photographs were taken for measurements and comparison. T4K showed a statistically significant reduction in the overjet (−2.50 ± 1.00 mm) (p < 0.0001), and a significant increase in the lower arch perimeter (LAP) (1.19 ± 0.96 mm) (p = 0.01). The twin block showed a statistically significant reduction in the overjet (−3.75 ± 1.10 mm) (p < 0.0001), a significant reduction in the overbite (−16.22 ± 17.02 %) (p = 0.03), and a significant increase in the LAP (1.69 ± 0.70 mm) (p < 0.0001). The overjet showed a higher significant decrease in the twin block group than in T4K (p = 0.03). The mean values of the overbite were significantly decreased in twin block than in T4k (p < 0.0001). Both groups showed significant dentoalveolar improvements toward class I occlusion; however, the twin block showed significantly better results than T4K appliance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies in Dentistry)
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