Special Issue "New Diagnostic and Treatment Techniques of Oral Microbiota"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gaetano Isola
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Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery and Surgical-Medical Specialties, School of Dentistry, University of Catania, 95124 Catania CT, Italy
Interests: periodontal disease; periodontal regeneration; biomaterials; local delivery agents; oral surgery; salivary diagnostics; antimicrobial agents; oral health; general health; quality of life
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Romeo Patini
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy
Interests: oral Surgery; Proteomics; dental anesthesia; aligners
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The oral microbiota is a key factor in oral health. It is well established that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota results in the manifestation of oral diseases such as caries and periodontitis. One of the essential tasks in oral health care is to maintain oral symbiosis in order to anticipate the global burden of diseases and the associated costs of caries and periodontal diseases. The maintenance of a symbiotic microbiota that passes through the control of dental plaque is a priority. Therefore, it is necessary to control dental plaque as a research priority. Because of their strong community synergism, biofilm-forming oral bacteria have been extensively studied, and new findings on pathogen and bacterial profiles in health and disease states have recently been brought to light, with the keystone pathogen concept in explaining the development of dysbiotic communities. Thus, the beneficial effects of the microbiome, the importance of balance, the role of host factors in dysbiosis, and the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies to maintain the balance of the oral microbiota constitute the essential framework of this Special Issue.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide insight into the recent advances in the field of new diagnostic and treatment techniques for the oral microbiota and related diseases induced by dysbiosis. Potential topics of interest of this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, in vitro and clinical research on oral health, oral pathology, oral surgery and oral microbiology.

Studies incorporating a new approach or providing novel information are of higher priority. Systematic and narrative reviews in the field of dentistry mainly on infectious diseases are also welcome.

It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Gaetano Isola
Prof. Dr. Romeo Patini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • periodontitis
  • caries
  • oral health
  • microbiota
  • oral microbiology
  • oral bacteria
  • oral diseases
  • periodontal diseases
  • peri-implant diseases
  • dental infections
  • oral surgery
  • oral pathology
  • dental biomaterials
  • in vitro research
  • clinical research

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Oral Microbiota: Discovering and Facing the New Associations with Systemic Diseases
Pathogens 2020, 9(4), 313; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9040313 - 24 Apr 2020
Abstract
The economic crisis of the first decades of the 2000s had serious repercussions on the economy of individual countries, producing a gradual impoverishment of populations. The reduction in financial resources has significantly reduced citizens’ access to care, forcing them to abandon preventive medicine [...] Read more.
The economic crisis of the first decades of the 2000s had serious repercussions on the economy of individual countries, producing a gradual impoverishment of populations. The reduction in financial resources has significantly reduced citizens’ access to care, forcing them to abandon preventive medicine treatments and check-ups. The health of the oral cavity, which had long been considered of secondary importance when compared with systemic pathologies whose course can be potentially fatal for the patient, has therefore been strongly neglected. In recent years, however, new mechanisms of etiology of systemic diseases have been studied with the aim of evaluating some aspects still unknown. The microbiota, whose interest has grown considerably in the national scientific community, was immediately considered as a key factor in the pathogenesis of some disorders. These analyses have also benefited from numerous advances in the field of crop and molecular diagnostics in the microbiological field. Although pioneering studies have focused on the microbiota of the gastro-intestinal system, subsequent evidence has also been drawn from various studies conducted on the oral microbiota. What emerged is that oral microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with numerous systemic diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this Special Issue is to encourage scientific research on the topic of the relationship between the oral microbiota and systemic diseases, also inviting the use of new techniques for culture and molecular diagnosis. Particular attention will be given to original works in vivo and to literature reviews provided they are carried out with a systematic approach and, if possible, supported by additional quantitative analyses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Diagnostic and Treatment Techniques of Oral Microbiota)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Characterizing Peri-Implant and Sub-Gingival Microbiota through Culturomics. First Isolation of Some Species in the Oral Cavity. A Pilot Study
Pathogens 2020, 9(5), 365; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9050365 - 10 May 2020
Abstract
Background: In recent years, culture-independent molecular techniques have been developed to investigate microbiota considered uncultivable. However, the data in the literature suggest that molecular techniques and cultural methods target different spectra of bacteria. The objective of this pilot study was to search for [...] Read more.
Background: In recent years, culture-independent molecular techniques have been developed to investigate microbiota considered uncultivable. However, the data in the literature suggest that molecular techniques and cultural methods target different spectra of bacteria. The objective of this pilot study was to search for not yet identified oral species in the peri-implant and sub-gingival microbiota in patients without signs of oral pathologies, through the use of the culturomics approach, which has never been used before in dentistry. Methods: Four patients were enrolled; from each patient, samples of sub-gingival and peri-implant plaque were taken and analysed by culturomics. Results: Of 48 isolated species, only 30 had been previously identified by metagenomics in other studies; on the contrary, 12 species had never been associated with the oral cavity before, and 5 of them had never been isolated from clinical specimens. Conclusions: By adopting culturomics in dentistry, it could be possible to identify a large amount of fastidious microorganisms that inhabit the oral cavity and to more accurately characterize the microorganisms that lead to periodontitis and peri-implantitis. This evidence could represent an important step forward for the diagnosis and treatment of peri-implantitis, as well as a very useful means for the characterization of new potential aetiologic agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Diagnostic and Treatment Techniques of Oral Microbiota)
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