Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Regenerative Dentistry and Biomaterials

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Dental Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2024 | Viewed by 10666

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Regional Dental Community Service “Sorriso & Benessere - Ricerca e Clinica”, 70129 Bari, Italy
Interests: tissue engineering; cell culture; biomaterials; bone biology; regenerative medicine; stem cell biology; stem cell differentiation; periodontics; oral surgery; sentistry; orthodontics
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Guest Editor
Full Professor, Department of Translational Biomedicine and Neuroscience (DiBraiN), University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, 70121 Bari, Italy
Interests: regenerative medicine; regenerative dentistry; stem cells; MSCs; biomaterials; growth factors; PRF; PRP; tissue engineering; biomimetics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce this Special Issue titled “Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Regenerative Dentistry and Biomaterials”.

The aim is to provide a venue for networking and communication between Dentistry Journal and scholars in the field of regenerative dentistry and biomaterials. All papers will be fully open access upon publication after peer review.

Feel free to contact the Managing Editor Ms. Adele Min ([email protected]) or our editorial office ([email protected]) if you have any requests.

We look forward to receiving your excellent work.

Prof. Dr. Alexander M. Korsunsky
Prof. Dr. Stefania Cantore
Prof. Dr. Marco Tatullo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1701 KiB  
Article
A Potential Intracanal Medicament, 2-Hydroxyisocaproic Acid (HICA): Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity, and Its Effect on SCAP Differentiation
by Cristine Smoczer, Yun K. Park, James B. Herrington, Mazin A. Askar, Sarah Plecha, Eric Krukonis and Susan B. Paurazas
Dent. J. 2023, 11(12), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11120270 - 27 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1768
Abstract
Intracanal medicaments with maximal antimicrobial efficacy and minimal damage to resident stem cells are essential for successful regenerative endodontic procedures. 2-Hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) could have the attributes of a potential intracanal medicament. This study evaluates its cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and effects on the odontogenic [...] Read more.
Intracanal medicaments with maximal antimicrobial efficacy and minimal damage to resident stem cells are essential for successful regenerative endodontic procedures. 2-Hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) could have the attributes of a potential intracanal medicament. This study evaluates its cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and effects on the odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAP). Cytotoxicity and cell viability assays were performed on cells treated for 24, 48, and 72 h with varying concentrations of HICA and compared to the standard intracanal medicament, calcium hydroxide. The genotoxicity was assessed via immunofluorescence for two markers of DNA double-strand breaks: phosphorylated γH2AX and 53BP1. The SCAP differentiation was evaluated based on the alkaline phosphatase activity, Alizarin Red staining, and expression of odontogenic and osteogenic genes (DSPP1, BSP1, OCN, RUNX2) in the presence of selected HICA concentrations. HICA was not cytotoxic at concentrations up to 10 mg/mL, regardless of the exposure time, although it was cytostatic at all tested concentrations. HICA was not genotoxic at concentrations below 5 mg/mL. No difference in cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was found between HICA and calcium hydroxide at 1 mg/mL. HICA retained about 70% of the osteogenic differentiation potential at 1 mg/mL. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, we show that HICA at 1 mg/mL could be a potential intracanal medicament for REPs. Full article
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10 pages, 1022 KiB  
Article
Growth Factors Released from Advanced Platelet-Rich Fibrin in the Presence of Calcium-Based Silicate Materials and Their Impact on the Viability and Migration of Stem Cells of Apical Papilla
by Cristine Smoczer, Kenneth R. Yuth, Mazin A. Askar, Laura A. Young and Susan B. Paurazas
Dent. J. 2023, 11(9), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11090220 - 19 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1583
Abstract
Advanced platelet-rich fibrin (A-PRF) provides the scaffold and growth factors necessary for stem cells to proliferate and differentiate in successful regenerative endodontic procedures. This study investigates the release of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) [...] Read more.
Advanced platelet-rich fibrin (A-PRF) provides the scaffold and growth factors necessary for stem cells to proliferate and differentiate in successful regenerative endodontic procedures. This study investigates the release of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from A-PRF in cell culture media in the presence and absence of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or Biodentine. Additionally, this research assesses the viability and migration of stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAP) in previously conditioned media. A-PRF obtained from 14 participants were incubated for 7 days in cell culture media alone or via layering with MTA or Biodentine discs and the release of selected growth factors in the media was evaluated using ELISA. The viability of SCAP grown in conditioned media was measured using the CCK8 assay, while SCAP migration was assessed via a transwell assay by counting migrated cells. The release of TGF-β1, PDGF, and VEGF was significantly higher in media with A-PRF alone than in the presence of either calcium-based silicate material (p < 0.05), which showed no difference from the no-A-PRF control (p < 0.05). None of the tested growth factors released in the A-PRF-conditioned media correlated with clot weight. A-PRF-conditioned media, both with and without calcium-based silicate materials, did not impact SCAP viability and migration (p > 0.05). This study shows that SCAP behavior is not impacted by the decrease in growth factor released in the presence of calcium-based silicate materials and that their role in REPs warrants further investigation. Full article
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18 pages, 4390 KiB  
Article
Time-Lapse In Situ 3D Imaging Analysis of Human Enamel Demineralisation Using X-ray Synchrotron Tomography
by Cyril Besnard, Ali Marie, Sisini Sasidharan, Robert A. Harper, Shashidhara Marathe, Jonathan Moffat, Richard M. Shelton, Gabriel Landini and Alexander M. Korsunsky
Dent. J. 2023, 11(5), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11050130 - 9 May 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2056
Abstract
Caries is a chronic disease that causes the alteration of the structure of dental tissues by acid dissolution (in enamel, dentine and cementum) and proteolytic degradation (dentine and cementum) and generates an important cost of care. There is a need to visualise and [...] Read more.
Caries is a chronic disease that causes the alteration of the structure of dental tissues by acid dissolution (in enamel, dentine and cementum) and proteolytic degradation (dentine and cementum) and generates an important cost of care. There is a need to visualise and characterise the acid dissolution process on enamel due to its hierarchical structure leading to complex structural modifications. The process starts at the enamel surface and progresses into depth, which necessitates the study of the internal enamel structure. Artificial demineralisation is usually employed to simulate the process experimentally. In the present study, the demineralisation of human enamel was studied using surface analysis carried out with atomic force microscopy as well as 3D internal analysis using synchrotron X-ray tomography during acid exposure with repeated scans to generate a time-lapse visualisation sequence. Two-dimensional analysis from projections and virtual slices and 3D analysis of the enamel mass provided details of tissue changes at the level of the rods and inter-rod substance. In addition to the visualisation of structural modifications, the rate of dissolution was determined, which demonstrated the feasibility and usefulness of these techniques. The temporal analysis of enamel demineralisation is not limited to dissolution and can be applied to other experimental conditions for the analysis of treated enamel or remineralisation. Full article
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20 pages, 2435 KiB  
Article
A 23-Year Observational Follow-Up Clinical Evaluation of Direct Posterior Composite Restorations
by Marie O. von Gehren, Stefan Rüttermann, Georgios E. Romanos, Eva Herrmann and Susanne Gerhardt-Szép
Dent. J. 2023, 11(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11030069 - 1 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2395
Abstract
The purpose of this observational follow-up clinical study was to observe the quality of posterior composite restorations more than 23 years after application. A total of 22 patients, 13 male and 9 female (mean age 66.1 years, range 50–84), with a total of [...] Read more.
The purpose of this observational follow-up clinical study was to observe the quality of posterior composite restorations more than 23 years after application. A total of 22 patients, 13 male and 9 female (mean age 66.1 years, range 50–84), with a total of 42 restorations attended the first and second follow-up examinations. The restorations were examined by one operator using modified FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed with the Wilcoxon Mann–Whitney U test and Wilcoxon exact matched-pairs test with a significance level of p = 0.05. Bonferroni–Holm with an adjusted significance level of alpha = 0.05 was applied. With the exception of approximal anatomical form, significantly worse scores were seen for six out of seven criteria at the second follow-up evaluation. There was no significant difference in the first and second follow-up evaluations in the grades of the restorations with regard to having been placed in the maxilla or mandible, as well as for one-surface or multiple-surface restorations. The approximal anatomical form showed significantly worse grades at the second follow-up when having been placed in molars. In conclusion, the study results show that significant differences regarding FDI criteria in posterior composite restorations occur after more than 23 years of service. Further studies with extended follow-up time and at regular and short time intervals are recommended. Full article
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Review

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23 pages, 579 KiB  
Review
Propolis Controlled Delivery Systems for Oral Therapeutics in Dental Medicine: A Systematic Review
by Andressa da Silva Barboza, Juliana Silva Ribeiro de Andrade, Monika Lamas Ferreira, Carla Lucía David Peña, Juliê Silveira da Costa, André Ricardo Fajardo and Rafael Guerra Lund
Dent. J. 2023, 11(7), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11070162 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2168
Abstract
This systematic review synthesizes the existing evidence in the literature regarding the association of propolis with controlled delivery systems (DDSs) and its potential therapeutic action in dental medicine. Two independent reviewers performed a literature search up to 1 June 2023 in five databases: [...] Read more.
This systematic review synthesizes the existing evidence in the literature regarding the association of propolis with controlled delivery systems (DDSs) and its potential therapeutic action in dental medicine. Two independent reviewers performed a literature search up to 1 June 2023 in five databases: PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Embase, to identify the eligible studies. Clinical, in situ, and in vitro studies that investigated the incorporation of propolis as the main agent in DDSs for dental medicine were included in this study. Review articles, clinical cases, theses, dissertations, conference abstracts, and studies that had no application in dentistry were excluded. A total of 2019 records were initially identified. After carefully examining 21 full-text articles, 12 in vitro studies, 4 clinical, 1 animal model, and 3 in vivo and in vitro studies were included (n = 21). Relevant data were extracted from the included studies and analyzed qualitatively. The use of propolis has been reported in cariology, endodontics, periodontics, stomatology, and dental implants. Propolis has shown non-cytotoxic, osteoinductive, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Moreover, propolis can be released from DDS for prolonged periods, presenting biocompatibility, safety, and potential advantage for applications in dental medicine. Full article
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