Special Issue "Imaging Science in Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Madhu K. Nair
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Diagnostic Sciences, Texas A&M University College of Dentistry, Dallas, TX, USA
Interests: 3D imaging and image analyses; evaluation of imaging modalities for specific applications including cochlear implant imaging, radiology informatics; PACS; teleradiology; digital imaging; tissue engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is an overview of current, evidence-based materials available in the different disciplines of dentistry as regards the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in diagnosing various maxillofacial and dental conditions. It will review the available literature and highlight the availability, or lack thereof, of studies with a high level of evidence for several common diagnostic tasks, while also addressing the deficiencies noted with a view to developing evidence-based guidelines and appropriateness criteria for the use of CBCT in various dental specialties.

Prof. Dr. Madhu K. Nair
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cone beam computed tomography
  • Evidence-based
  • Periodontics
  • Orthodontics
  • Endodontics
  • Oral surgery
  • Dental implant
  • Orthognathic
  • Temporomandibular joint
  • Fracture
  • Trauma
  • Guidelines
  • Dose
  • Protocol
  • Selection criteria

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

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Review
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Orthodontics
Dent. J. 2019, 7(3), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7030089 - 02 Sep 2019
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3770
Abstract
Unlike patients receiving implants or endodontic treatment, most orthodontic patients are children who are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) carries risks and benefits in orthodontics. The principal risks and limitations include ionizing radiation, the presence of artifacts, higher cost, [...] Read more.
Unlike patients receiving implants or endodontic treatment, most orthodontic patients are children who are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) carries risks and benefits in orthodontics. The principal risks and limitations include ionizing radiation, the presence of artifacts, higher cost, limited accessibility, and the need for additional training. However, this imaging modality has several recognized indications in orthodontics, such as the assessment of impacted and ectopic teeth, assessment of pharyngeal airway, assessment of mini-implant sites, evaluation of craniofacial abnormalities, evaluation of sinus anatomy or pathology, evaluation of root resorption, evaluation of the cortical bone plate, and orthognathic surgery planning and evaluation. CBCT is particularly justified when it brings a benefit to the patient or changes the outcome of the treatment when compared with conventional imaging techniques. Therefore, CBCT should be considered for clinical orthodontics for selected patients. Prescription of CBCT requires judicious and sound clinical judgment. The central question of this narrative review article is: when does CBCT add value to the practice of orthodontics? To answer this question, this article presents discussion on radiation dosage of CBCT and other imaging techniques used in orthodontics, limitations of CBCT in orthodontics, justifying the use of CBCT in orthodontics, and the benefits and evidence-based indications of CBCT in orthodontics. This review summarizes the central themes and topics in the literature regarding CBCT in orthodontics and presents ten orthodontic cases in which CBCT proved to be valuable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Science in Dentistry)
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Review
Role of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in the Management of Periodontal Disease
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020057 - 01 Jun 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2693
Abstract
The goal of this paper was to review the current literature surrounding the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) related to the diagnosis, prognostic determination, and treatment of periodontal diseases. A literature review was completed to identify peer-reviewed articles related to CBCT [...] Read more.
The goal of this paper was to review the current literature surrounding the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) related to the diagnosis, prognostic determination, and treatment of periodontal diseases. A literature review was completed to identify peer-reviewed articles related to CBCT and periodontics. The results were filtered to pool only articles specific to CBCT and periodontal diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment/outcomes. The articles were reviewed and findings summarized. Author’s commentary on technological advances and additional potential uses of CBCT in the field of periodontics were included. There is evidence to suggest that CBCT imaging can be more accurate in diagnosing specific periodontal defects (intrabony and furcation defects), and therefore be helpful in the prognostic determination and treatment planning. However, at this time, CBCT cannot be recommended as the standard of care. It is up to the individual clinician to use one’s own judgment as to when the additional information provided by CBCT may be beneficial, while applying the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle. With continued technological advances in CBCT imaging (higher resolution, reduced imaging artifacts, lower exposure, etc.) the author’s believe that CBCT usage will become more prominent in diagnosis and treatment of periodontal diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Science in Dentistry)
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Review
Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: An Evidence-Based Review
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020052 - 02 May 2019
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 2975
Abstract
Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a valuable imaging technique in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) that can help direct a surgeon’s approach to a variety of conditions. A 3-dimensional analysis of head and neck anatomy allows practitioners to plan appropriately, operate with [...] Read more.
Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a valuable imaging technique in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) that can help direct a surgeon’s approach to a variety of conditions. A 3-dimensional analysis of head and neck anatomy allows practitioners to plan appropriately, operate with confidence, and assess results post-operatively. CBCT imaging has clear indications and limitations. CBCT offers the clinician 3-dimensional and multi-planar views for a more accurate diagnosis and treatment without the financial burden and radiation exposure of conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. Furthermore, CBCT overcomes certain limitations of 2-dimensional imaging, such as distortion, magnification, and superimposition. However, CBCT lacks the detailed depiction of soft tissue conditions for evaluation of pathologic conditions, head and neck infections, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc evaluation. This review evaluates the evidence-based research supporting the application of CBCT in the various fields of oral and maxillofacial surgery, including dentoalveolar surgery, dental implants, TMJ, orthognathic surgery, trauma, and pathology, and will assess the value of CBCT in pre-operative assessment, surgical planning, and post-operative analysis when applicable. Additionally, the significant limitations of CBCT and potential areas for future research will be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Science in Dentistry)

Other

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Case Report
Comparison of Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Radiographs Using Clinically Relevant Parameters
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020050 - 01 May 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2721
Abstract
This work compared the assessment of clinically relevant parameters by two-dimensional, that is, full-mouth intraoral radiograph (I-O) and panoramic radiograph (OPT), and three-dimensional, that is, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), imaging methods. Different radiographic images (CBCT, I-O and OPT) were available for a [...] Read more.
This work compared the assessment of clinically relevant parameters by two-dimensional, that is, full-mouth intraoral radiograph (I-O) and panoramic radiograph (OPT), and three-dimensional, that is, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), imaging methods. Different radiographic images (CBCT, I-O and OPT) were available for a 53-year-old female patient with dental and periodontal problems. A total of 14 dental and periodontal parameters were assessed by two independent examiners and compared among the three radiographic imaging modalities. For 10 parameters (71%), the CBCT images were superior to both I-O and OPT images. In contrast, CBCT demonstrated an inferior performance compared to I-O and OPT in the assessment of caries and dental restorations. Compared to OPT, I-O provided more clinically relevant findings for 10 out of 14 parameters (71%). Agreement between I-O and OPT was found with respect to dehiscence, fenestration, the number of bone walls and the root canal cross-section. Differences between the radiographic images were more likely to be detected when maxillary teeth rather than mandibular teeth were assessed with regard to furcation involvement, root proximity and root fusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Science in Dentistry)
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