Special Issue "Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer: Current Status and Future Perspectives"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Breast Cancer".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2022 | Viewed by 718

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Benjamin W. Corn
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Guest Editor
Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel
Interests: breast cancer; PROMs; science of hope
Dr. Shira L. Galper
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Co-Guest Editor
Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel
Interests: breast cancer; radiation; PBI; breast radiation in young women
Prof. Dr. Merav A. Ben-David
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Co-Guest Editor
Israel Assuta Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
Interests: breast cancer; radiation; genetics; re-irradiation; PBI

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Breast cancer represents the malignancy most widely treated by radiation oncologists.  As a result, it has been the subject of numerous studies and practices have evolved over time. An array of creative questions has been posed within the field of breast radiation oncology with the goals of improving cancer outcomes, decreasing treatment related toxicity, and improving quality of life for breast cancer patients and survivors.

In this Special Issue of Current Oncology, we welcome the input from leaders in the field of radiation. Contributors may wish to explore one of the topics identified by the editors (e.g., radiation dose de-escalation, boost techniques, partial breast irradiation, re-irradiation, nodal management, onco-plastics, the treatment of oligometastatic and oligoprogressive disease, incorporating bio-signatures into radiotherapeutic management, testing the limits of hypofractionation, addressing disparities in breast RT, new technologies such as proton and MR guidance, etc.) or propose alternative concepts which they deem valuable. In so doing, we hope to produce a volume which is scholarly, thought-provoking, and clinically relevant.

Dr. Benjamin W. Corn
Dr. Shira L. Galper
Prof. Dr. Merav A. Ben-David
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • radiotherapy
  • oligometastases
  • hypofractionation
  • PBI
  • re-irradiation
  • biosignatures
  • diversity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Systematic Review
Efficacy and Safety of the Addition of Internal Mammary Irradiation to Standard Adjuvant Radiation in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(9), 6657-6673; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29090523 - 17 Sep 2022
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Abstract
Background: Existing data on adding internal mammary nodal irradiation (IMNI) to the regional nodal fields are inconsistent. Methods: Randomized trials investigating the addition of IMNI to standard adjuvant radiation were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted for overall-survival [...] Read more.
Background: Existing data on adding internal mammary nodal irradiation (IMNI) to the regional nodal fields are inconsistent. Methods: Randomized trials investigating the addition of IMNI to standard adjuvant radiation were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted for overall-survival (OS), breast cancer specific-survival (BCSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) as well as distant-metastasis free survival (DMFS). The odds ratios (ORs) for regional and loco-regional recurrence, non-breast cancer mortality, secondary non-breast cancer, contralateral breast cancer, and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were also extracted. Results: Analysis included five trials comprising 10,994 patients, predominantly with higher risk, lymph node positive disease. Compared to the control group, IMNI was associated with significant improvement in OS (HR = 0.91, p = 0.004), BCSS (HR = 0.84, p < 0.001), DFS (HR = 0.89, p= 0.01), and DMFS (HR = 0.89, p = 0.02). IMNI was also associated with reduced odds for regional (OR = 0.58, p < 0.001) and loco-regional recurrence (OR = 0.85, p = 0.04). The odds for cardiotoxicity were not statistically significantly higher (OR = 1.23, p = 0.07). There were comparable odds for cardiovascular mortality (OR = 1.00, p = 1.00), non-breast cancer mortality (OR = 1.05, p = 0.74), secondary cancer (OR = 0.95, p = 0.51), and contra-lateral breast cancer (OR = 1.07, 95% 0.77–1.51, p = 0.68). Conclusions: Compared to the control group, the addition of IMNI in high-risk patients is associated with a statistically significant improvement in survival, albeit with a magnitude of questionable clinical meaningfulness. Full article
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