Special Issue "New Frontiers in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Thoracic Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Filippo Pesapane
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Breast Radiology IEO, European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Milan, Italy
Interests: radiology; breast cancer; breast imaging; oncology; radiomics; artificial intelligence
Dr. Matteo Basilio Suter
E-Mail
Guest Editor
SC Oncologia, ASST Sette Laghi, Varese, Italy
Interests: transitional oncology; liquid biopsy; breast cancer; lung cancer; phase I

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among women worldwide. In recent decades, there substantial advances in screening methods, early diagnosis, and breakthroughs in treatments have increased survival rates among women with breast cancer. Particularly, advances in medical imaging and genetic knowledge and introduction of artificial intelligence technology in radiological practice have paved the way to true personalized medicine through an implementation of radiomics, radiogenomics, and liquid biopsy. Similarly, progress in molecular biology and pharmacology has aided toward a better understanding of breast cancer, enabling the design of smarter therapeutics able to target cancer and respond to its microenvironment efficiently.

In this Special Issues, we aim to collect original studies, meta-analysis, reviews, pictorial review, and letters investigating the new frontiers of diagnosis and novel treatment strategies for breast cancer.

Dr. Filippo Pesapane
Dr. Matteo Basilio Suter
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • oncology
  • personalized medicine
  • radiomics
  • radiogenomics
  • breast imaging
  • artificial intelligence
  • transitional oncology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Usefulness of Spectral Mammography in Surgical Planning of Breast Cancer Treatment—Analysis of 999 Patients with Primary Operable Breast Cancer
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(4), 2548-2559; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28040232 - 12 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a promising, digital breast imaging method for planning surgeries. The study aimed at comparing digital mammography (MG) with CESM as predictive factors in visualizing multifocal-multicentric cancers (MFMCC) before determining the surgery extent. We analyzed 999 patients after breast [...] Read more.
Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a promising, digital breast imaging method for planning surgeries. The study aimed at comparing digital mammography (MG) with CESM as predictive factors in visualizing multifocal-multicentric cancers (MFMCC) before determining the surgery extent. We analyzed 999 patients after breast cancer surgery to compare MG and CESM in terms of detecting MFMCC. Moreover, these procedures were assessed for their conformity with postoperative histopathology (HP), calculating their sensitivity and specificity. The question was which histopathological types of breast cancer were more frequently characterized by multifocality–multicentrality in comparable techniques as regards the general number of HP-identified cancers. The analysis involved the frequency of post-CESM changes in the extent of planned surgeries. In the present study, MG revealed 48 (4.80%) while CESM 170 (17.02%) MFMCC lesions, subsequently confirmed in HP. MG had MFMCC detecting sensitivity of 38.51%, specificity 99.01%, PPV (positive predictive value) 85.71%, and NPV (negative predictive value) 84.52%. The respective values for CESM were 87.63%, 94.90%, 80.57% and 96.95%. Moreover, no statistically significant differences were found between lobular and NST cancers (27.78% vs. 21.24%) regarding MFMCC. A treatment change was required by 20.00% of the patients from breast-conserving to mastectomy, upon visualizing MFMCC in CESM. In conclusion, mammography offers insufficient diagnostic sensitivity for detecting additional cancer foci. The high diagnostic sensitivity of CESM effectively assesses breast cancer multifocality/multicentrality and significantly changes the extent of planned surgeries. The multifocality/multicentrality concerned carcinoma, lobular and invasive carcinoma of no special type (NST) cancers with similar incidence rates, which requires further confirmation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment)
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Article
Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of Circulating Tumor DNA Mutations among Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(4), 2326-2336; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28040214 - 24 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Liquid biopsy through the detection of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has potential advantages in cancer monitoring and prediction. However, most previous studies in this area were performed with a few hotspot genes, single time point detection, or insufficient sequencing depth. In this study, [...] Read more.
Liquid biopsy through the detection of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has potential advantages in cancer monitoring and prediction. However, most previous studies in this area were performed with a few hotspot genes, single time point detection, or insufficient sequencing depth. In this study, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) with a customized panel in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. Fifty-four plasma samples were taken before chemotherapy and after the third course of treatment for detection and analysis. Paired lymphocytes were also included to eliminate clonal hematopoiesis (CH)-related alternatives. A total of 1182 nonsynonymous mutations in 419 genes were identified. More ctDNA mutations were detected in patients with tumors > 3 cm (p = 0.035) and HER2(−) patients (p = 0.029). For a single gene, the distribution of ctDNA mutations was also correlated with clinical characteristics. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that HER2 status was significantly associated with mutation burden (OR 0.02, 95% CI 0–0.62, p = 0.025). The profiles of ctDNA mutations exhibited marked discrepancies between two time points, and baseline ctDNA was more sensitive and specific than that after chemotherapy. Finally, elevated ctDNA mutation level was positively correlated with poor survival (p < 0.001). Mutations in ctDNA could serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation, prediction, and clinical management guidance of MBC patients with chemotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment)
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Review

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Review
Recent Radiomics Advancements in Breast Cancer: Lessons and Pitfalls for the Next Future
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(4), 2351-2372; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28040217 - 25 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Radiomics is an emerging translational field of medicine based on the extraction of high-dimensional data from radiological images, with the purpose to reach reliable models to be applied into clinical practice for the purposes of diagnosis, prognosis and evaluation of disease response to [...] Read more.
Radiomics is an emerging translational field of medicine based on the extraction of high-dimensional data from radiological images, with the purpose to reach reliable models to be applied into clinical practice for the purposes of diagnosis, prognosis and evaluation of disease response to treatment. We aim to provide the basic information on radiomics to radiologists and clinicians who are focused on breast cancer care, encouraging cooperation with scientists to mine data for a better application in clinical practice. We investigate the workflow and clinical application of radiomics in breast cancer care, as well as the outlook and challenges based on recent studies. Currently, radiomics has the potential ability to distinguish between benign and malignant breast lesions, to predict breast cancer’s molecular subtypes, the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the lymph node metastases. Even though radiomics has been used in tumor diagnosis and prognosis, it is still in the research phase and some challenges need to be faced to obtain a clinical translation. In this review, we discuss the current limitations and promises of radiomics for improvement in further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment)
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