Radiotherapy in Brain Tumors

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuro-Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 1824

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy
Interests: brain tumors; radiotherapy; neuro-oncology; biomarkers; translational oncology
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Guest Editor
Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Anatomical Pathology, Division of Radiotherapy, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy
Interests: brain tumors; brain metastases; glioblastoma; radiotherapy; radiosurgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Radiation therapy is a fundamental treatment for the management of patients with brain tumors. In particular, modern radiotherapy with its very high precision provides a treatment that treats all oncological targets while sparing the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, radiotherapy treatments are used to manage almost all oncological diseases of the brain, often associated with drugs that seek to improve the outcomes of these patients. This Special Issue aims to collect all the papers that transversally concern all aspects of the use of radiotherapy in brain tumors, from radiobiology to translational neuro-oncological radiotherapy, as well as the clinical impact of most modern radiotherapy treatment techniques.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: radiobiology, radiotherapy in brain tumors, the impact of new modern radiotherapy in brain tumors, the integration of new drugs with radiation treatment in brain tumors, and re-irradiation in brain tumors. Predictive bio-clinical markers in radiation treatment.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Paolo Tini
Dr. Giuseppe Minniti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • radiobiology in brain tumors
  • radiotherapy treatment in brain tumors
  • re-irradiation in brain tumors
  • the impact of new technologies in radiation treatment of brain tumors
  • predictors of response to radiotherapy treatment in brain tumors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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13 pages, 3093 KiB  
Article
Prognosis versus Actual Outcomes in Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Reliability of Common Prognostic Parameters and Indices
by Julian Mangesius, Thomas Seppi, Christoph Reinhold Arnold, Stephanie Mangesius, Johannes Kerschbaumer, Matthias Demetz, Danijela Minasch, Samuel Moritz Vorbach, Manuel Sarcletti, Peter Lukas, Meinhard Nevinny-Stickel and Ute Ganswindt
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(4), 1739-1751; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31040132 - 26 Mar 2024
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Abstract
This study aims to evaluate the clinical outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery as the sole treatment for brain metastases and to assess prognostic factors influencing survival. A total of 108 consecutive patients with 213 metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment was determined with close-meshed MRI [...] Read more.
This study aims to evaluate the clinical outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery as the sole treatment for brain metastases and to assess prognostic factors influencing survival. A total of 108 consecutive patients with 213 metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment was determined with close-meshed MRI follow-up. Various prognostic factors were assessed, and several prognostic indices were compared regarding their reliability to estimate overall survival. Median overall survival was 15 months; one-year overall survival was 50.5%. Both one- and two-year local controls were 90.9%. The rate of new metastases after SRS was 49.1%. Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors revealed that the presence of extracranial metastases, male sex, lower KPI, and progressive extracranial disease were significant risk factors for decreased survival. Of all evaluated prognostic indices, the Basic Score for Brain Metastases (BSBMs) showed the best correlation with overall survival. A substantial survival advantage was found for female patients after SRS when compared to male patients (18 versus 9 months, p = 0.003). SRS of brain metastasis is a safe and effective treatment option when frequent monitoring for new metastases with MRI is performed. Common prognostic scores lack reliable estimation of survival times. Female sex should be considered as an additional independent positive prognostic factor influencing survival. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radiotherapy in Brain Tumors)
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10 pages, 970 KiB  
Article
Response Assessment in Brain Metastases Managed by Stereotactic Radiosurgery: A Reappraisal of the RANO-BM Criteria
by Keiss Douri, Christian Iorio-Morin, Rosalie Mercure-Cyr, Gabrielle Figueiredo, Charles Jean Touchette, Laurence Masson-Côté and David Mathieu
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(11), 9382-9391; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30110679 - 24 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Background: Brain metastases (BM) are increasingly being treated using stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Standardized response criteria are necessary to improve research and treatment protocols. This study’s goal was to validate the RANO-BM criteria thresholds for tumor progression in a cohort of patients with brain [...] Read more.
Background: Brain metastases (BM) are increasingly being treated using stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Standardized response criteria are necessary to improve research and treatment protocols. This study’s goal was to validate the RANO-BM criteria thresholds for tumor progression in a cohort of patients with brain metastases managed using SRS. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients treated at least twice with SRS for brain metastases. Local progression, as defined by RANO-BM criteria, was compared to our multidisciplinary tumor board’s treatment recommendation. A ROC curve was generated using varying diameter thresholds to assess the sensitivity and specificity of current RANO-BM criteria. Results: 249 metastases in 67 patients were included in the analysis. RANO-BM criteria current progression thresholds yielded a sensitivity of 38%, a specificity of 95%, a positive predictive value of 71%, and a negative predictive value of 84% relative to our tumor board’s treatment recommendation. Modified RANO-BM criteria using absolute diameter differences of 2.5 mm yielded a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 87%, a positive predictive value of 67% and a negative predictive value of 94%. Conclusions: Current RANO-BM criteria unreliably identifies clinically relevant tumor progression. The use of absolute diameter differences thresholds appears superior in our BM cohort. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radiotherapy in Brain Tumors)
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