Special Issue "Elasticity and Micro- and Macro- Plasticity of Crystals"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Vladimir I. Nikolaev Website E-Mail
Ioffe Institute, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation
Interests: single crystals; crystal growth; mechanical properties; elasticity; plasticity
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Vitaly V. Shpeizman Website E-Mail
Ioffe Institute, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation
Interests: micro-plasticity; plasticity; low temperature; electro-magnetic field effect; crystal structure defects

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Studies of elasticity, plasticity, and strength of crystalline materials are among the oldest areas of science. In previous times, these properties and their relationship with the crystal structure were the focus of research; in recent years, much attention has been paid to the study of new construction and functional materials with special properties (nanostructured materials, materials with shape memory, semiconductors and superconductors, optical crystals, etc.) or materials that operate in special conditions (low and high temperatures, radiation, magnetic and electric fields, etc.). Knowledge of elastic and plastic characteristics is necessary for the development of technologies for the fabrication novel materials. For example, crystal growth processes may be effective if we can control thermal stresses and their relaxation. The fracture characteristics and methods of development of crystalline materials hardening are also very important.

We invite researchers to submit papers to this Special Issue “Elasticity and Micro- and Macro-Plasticity” of Crystals. Articles on a wide range of studies of elastic and plastic properties of crystalline materials will be collected, as well as variations of these properties under various impacts.

Prof. Dr. Vladimir I. Nikolaev
Prof. Dr. Vitaly V. Shpeizman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • single crystals mechanical properties: insulators, semiconductors, metals, and alloys
  • elastic and non-elastic properties of single crystals
  • microplasticity
  • electric and magnetic field effect on plasticity and strength of crystals
  • polycrystals: defects and plasticity
  • nanocrystals plasticity
  • low and high temperature plasticity
  • superelasticity and shape memory deformation
  • ferroelasticity

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Autowave Physics of Material Plasticity
Crystals 2019, 9(9), 458; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9090458 - 02 Sep 2019
Abstract
The notions of plastic flow localization are outlined in the paper. It is shown that each type of localized plasticity pattern corresponds to a definite stage of deformation hardening. In the course of plastic flow development, a changeover in the types of localization [...] Read more.
The notions of plastic flow localization are outlined in the paper. It is shown that each type of localized plasticity pattern corresponds to a definite stage of deformation hardening. In the course of plastic flow development, a changeover in the types of localization patterns occurs. The types of localization patterns are limited in number: four pattern types are all that can be expected. A correspondence was set up between the emergent localization pattern and the respective flow stage. It is found that the localization patterns are manifestations of the autowave nature of plastic flow localization process, with each pattern type corresponding to a definite mode of autowave. In the course of plastic flow development, the following modes of autowaves will form in the following sequence: switching autowave → phase autowave → stationary dissipative structure → collapse of the autowave. Of particular interest are the phase autowave and the respective pattern observed. Propagation velocity, dispersion, and grain size dependence of wavelength were determined experimentally for the phase autowave. An elastic-plastic strain invariant was also introduced to relate the elastic and plastic properties of the deforming medium. It is found that the autowave characteristics follow directly from this invariant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Elasticity and Micro- and Macro- Plasticity of Crystals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Nanoscale Mechanical and Mechanically-Induced Electrical Properties of Silicon Nanowires
Crystals 2019, 9(5), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9050240 - 07 May 2019
Abstract
Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was employed to examine the deformation and phase transformation of mono-crystalline Si nanowire (SiNW) subjected to tensile stress. The techniques of coordination number (CN) and centro-symmetry parameter (CSP) were used to monitor and elucidate the detailed mechanisms of the [...] Read more.
Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was employed to examine the deformation and phase transformation of mono-crystalline Si nanowire (SiNW) subjected to tensile stress. The techniques of coordination number (CN) and centro-symmetry parameter (CSP) were used to monitor and elucidate the detailed mechanisms of the phase transformation throughout the loading process in which the evolution of structural phase change and the dislocation pattern were identified. Therefore, the relationship between phase transformation and dislocation pattern was established and illustrated. In addition, the electrical resistance and conductivity of SiNW were evaluated by using the concept of virtual electric source during loading and unloading similar to in situ electrical measurements. The effects of temperature on phase transformation of mono-crystalline SiNWs for three different crystallographically oriented surfaces were investigated and discussed. Simulation results show that, with the increase of applied stress, the dislocations are initiated first and then the phase transformation such that the total energy of the system tends to approach a minimum level. Moreover, the electrical resistance of (001)- rather than (011)- and (111)-oriented SiNWs was changed before failure. As the stress level of the (001) SiNW reaches 24 GPa, a significant amount of metallic Si-II and amorphous phases is produced from the semiconducting Si-I phase and leads to a pronounced decrease of electrical resistance. It was also found that as the temperature of the system is higher than 500 K, the electrical resistance of (001) SiNW is significantly reduced through the process of axial elongation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Elasticity and Micro- and Macro- Plasticity of Crystals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop