Special Issue "Skin Barrier Function"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Se kyoo Jeong

Department of Bio-Cosmetic Science, Seowon University, Cheongju, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: skin barrier function, atopic dermatitis, digital healthcare, moisturizer, patients education
Guest Editor
Dr. Hyun Jung Kim

Seoul Medical Center, Seoul, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: skin barrier function, atopic dermatitis, digital healthcare, moisturizer, patients education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the ground-breaking emergence of a “brick and mortar” concept for stratum corneum in the mid-1970’s, research about the skin barrier functions has expanded from basic investigative dermatology to cosmetics, transdermal drug delivery, and even to digital healthcare areas. Recently, increased prevalence of skin diseases with barrier dysfunctions and environmental stress have made “skin barrier” one of the most widely used terms in cosmetics. However, developing new cosmetic ingredients, formulations, or devices addressing skin barrier function requires not only understanding the mechanisms of skin barrier homeostasis but having knowledge about diverse areas, including bioengineering technology for skin barrier measurement; instrumental analysis technology for assessing the molecular arrangement of stratum corneum intercellular lipids; and organic chemistry and biotechnology for producing key ingredients, such as ceramides.

This Special Issue “skin barrier function” is aimed at providing the necessary information required to apply the “skin barrier” concept for cosmetic products, encompassing basic research to practical development and clinical evaluation.

Prof. Dr. Se kyoo Jeong
Dr. Hyun Jung Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • skin barrier function
  • transdermal drug delivery
  • cosmetics
  • sphingolipids and ceramide
  • digital healthcare
  • stratum corneum intercellular lipids
  • cosmeceuticals
  • skin aging

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Noninvasive Skin Barrier Assessment: Multiparametric Approach and Pilot Study
Received: 8 February 2019 / Revised: 1 March 2019 / Accepted: 13 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
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Abstract
The epidermal barrier function is disrupted in various inflammatory skin diseases. Accurate methods to measure skin barrier function are needed to assess the effect of therapeutic agents. Therefore, we developed a noninvasive multiparametric approach to measure four different parameters regarding the skin barrier. [...] Read more.
The epidermal barrier function is disrupted in various inflammatory skin diseases. Accurate methods to measure skin barrier function are needed to assess the effect of therapeutic agents. Therefore, we developed a noninvasive multiparametric approach to measure four different parameters regarding the skin barrier. In the current pilot study, we evaluate this method in 14 healthy volunteers. We assessed erythema, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), water content, and epidermal thickness at both cheeks before and 30 min after application of Lanette and Vaseline-Lanette cream. For this, we used spectrophotometry, the Aquaflux device, the Epsilon device, and reflection confocal microscopy, respectively. Stratum corneum (SC) thickness was significantly increased after application of both creams (p < 0.05), and this increase was larger after Lanette cream compared to after Vaseline-Lanette cream (p = 0.035). Erythema, TEWL, and water content did not significantly change after cream application. Our multiparametric approach is promising and offers a feasible and practical way to quickly obtain multifaceted information about skin barrier function. Further exploration of this approach after prolonged use of cream and in conditions of disrupted skin barrier are recommended areas for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Barrier Function)
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Open AccessArticle
Hydration and Barrier Properties of Emulsions with the Addition of Keratin Hydrolysate
Received: 6 September 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 31 October 2018
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Abstract
Although keratin hydrolysates (KH) are added to skin care agents, detailed studies on the moisturising effects of KH are lacking. The aim of this study is to test whether adding KH into an ointment base (OB) heighten hydration of the skin and diminish [...] Read more.
Although keratin hydrolysates (KH) are added to skin care agents, detailed studies on the moisturising effects of KH are lacking. The aim of this study is to test whether adding KH into an ointment base (OB) heighten hydration of the skin and diminish transepidermal loss of water (TEWL). Formulations containing 2%, 4%, and 6% of KH (based on OB weight) were prepared. Hydration, TEWL and skin pH were measured; intervals of measurements were as follows: 1, 2, 3, 4, 24 and 48 h. Testing was carried out on 10 men. In terms of hydration, supplementing the OB with 2% KH is optimal, as an 11–19% increase occurs in hydration of stratum corneum (SC). All the formulations with added KH as tested caused TEWL to decline after application. Keratin hydrolysate makes for an excellent occlusive; adding it to OB results in a 30–50% reduction in TEWL after application. KH functions as a humectant as well, as it helps to bind water from the lower layers of the epidermis to the SC. Formulations with additions of 2–6% of KH were stable in structure and did not cause phase separation even after 6 months storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Barrier Function)
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Other

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Open AccessCommentary
Epidermal Endocannabinoid System (EES) and its Cosmetic Application
Received: 23 April 2019 / Revised: 14 May 2019 / Accepted: 14 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
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Abstract
Recently, cannabis, or its major constituent cannabidiol (CBD), has emerged as an attractive cosmetic ingredient. Initiated as a basic investigation of the physiological roles of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, endocannabinoids’ diverse potential benefits have been proposed for using cannabinoid receptor modulating [...] Read more.
Recently, cannabis, or its major constituent cannabidiol (CBD), has emerged as an attractive cosmetic ingredient. Initiated as a basic investigation of the physiological roles of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, endocannabinoids’ diverse potential benefits have been proposed for using cannabinoid receptor modulating compounds in skin health. Improvement in skin barrier functions, alleviating inflammatory responses, and the relief of itching sensations are some commonly expected therapeutic benefits, which have been supported by many in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies. While hemp seed oils or hemp extracts might be used for the cosmetic formulation, the potential for contamination with a psychoactive cannabinoid, such as 9-THC, should be carefully checked. Instead of using hemp-derived ingredients, the use of cannabinomimetics, synthetic ligands on cannabinoid receptors, or entourage compounds (which modulate intracellular synthesis and the degradation of endocannabinoids), have been tried. In this review, a brief introduction of the epidermal endocannabinoid system (EES) and its physiological roles will be followed by a review of the cosmetic and dermatologic application of cannabinomimetics and entourage compounds. The practical application of newly developed endocannabinomimetics will be discussed as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Barrier Function)
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