Special Issue "Efficacy Assessment of Cosmetics"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Med. Sc. Marie Lodén
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Eviderm Institute, Bergshamra Allé 9, SE-17077 Solna, Sweden
Interests: skin care; contact dermatitis; bioengineering methods; cosmetic efficacy; regulatory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skin care, oral care and hair care contain active ingredients that should provide efficacy to the cosmetic product. Some ingredients are designed to assist in the removal of unwanted substances from the surface (e.g., surfactants), while others should stay on the surface and immediately change the appearance (e.g., colors) or prevent changes occurring later (i.e., sunscreens). Some ingredients are designed to enter into the tissue and affect deeper effects, e.g., antiperspirants, humectants, and anti-ageing cosmetics.

The new European Cosmetic Regulation emphasizes the need for proof of efficacy to prevent consumers from misleading product presentations. Claim substantiation can be done using literature data and by testing in humans. The use of in vitro/ex vivo techniques and cell cultures has grown in importance, but the transfer of data to humans needs careful validation.

With the advent of more sensitive techniques, subtle changes in the skin from ordinary cosmetic ingredients are detected, making the border between medicinal products and cosmetics rather blurred; Medicinal products are known to restore, correct, or modify physiological functions by exerting a pharmacological, immunological or metabolic action, whereas cosmetic products are qualified as cosmetic if they not strictly modify the physiological function and not significantly affect the metabolism. In cosmetics, a number of medicinal substances are found without any significant action on the physiological function of the human body.

In this Special Issue, the claim substantiation of different types of cosmetics will be addressed. This will drive product innovation, demonstrate the power and efficacy of cosmetics and further increase consumer satisfaction.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Med. Sc. Marie Lodén
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • barrier function
  • anti-ageing
  • non-invasive measurement
  • TEWL
  • oral care
  • skin care
  • hair care

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
In Vitro DVS Approach to Evaluate Skin Reparation
Cosmetics 2016, 3(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics3020015 - 31 Mar 2016
Abstract
The stratum corneum (SC), the most superficial layer of the skin, is directly responsible for the skin’s barrier function. The intercellular lipids in the SC play an important role in the regulation of the skin’s water-holding capacity. The modification of the intercellular lipid [...] Read more.
The stratum corneum (SC), the most superficial layer of the skin, is directly responsible for the skin’s barrier function. The intercellular lipids in the SC play an important role in the regulation of the skin’s water-holding capacity. The modification of the intercellular lipid organization and composition may impair these properties. The aim of the present study is to describe a new in vitro approach of the repairing capacity evaluation of lipid formulations on skin with the use of absorption and desorption curves. The formulations were applied on lipid-extracted SC, and the possible SC reparation was assessed with the use of a thermogravimetric balance (DVS). Moisture absorption/desorption experiments proved to be adequate for the evaluation of the repairing capacity of formulations applied on damaged skin. Besides, freeze-substitution transmission electron microscopy (FSTEM) images showed some lipid bilayers, indicating a lipid bilayer reconstitution due to the applied formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficacy Assessment of Cosmetics)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Topical Peptide Treatments with Effective Anti-Aging Results
Cosmetics 2017, 4(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics4020016 - 22 May 2017
Cited by 20
Abstract
In the last two decades, many new peptides have been developed, and new knowledge on how peptides improve the skin has been uncovered. The spectrum of peptides in the field of cosmetics is continuously growing. This review summarizes some of the effective data [...] Read more.
In the last two decades, many new peptides have been developed, and new knowledge on how peptides improve the skin has been uncovered. The spectrum of peptides in the field of cosmetics is continuously growing. This review summarizes some of the effective data on cosmeceutical peptides that work against intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Some peptides have been proven in their efficacy through clinical skin trials. Well-known and documented peptides like copper tripeptide are still under research to obtain more details on their effectiveness, and for the development of new treatments. Palmitoyl pentapeptide-4 and Carnosine are other well-researched cosmeceuticals. Additionally, there are many more peptides that are used in cosmetics. However, study results for some are sparse, or have not been published in scientific journals. This article summarizes topical peptides with proven efficacy in controlled in vivo studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficacy Assessment of Cosmetics)
Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Effective Active Ingredients Obtained through Biotechnology
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics3040039 - 18 Nov 2016
Cited by 4
Abstract
The history of cosmetics develops in parallel to the history of man, associated with fishing, hunting, and superstition in the beginning, and later with medicine and pharmacy. Over the ages, together with human progress, cosmetics have changed continuously and nowadays the cosmetic market [...] Read more.
The history of cosmetics develops in parallel to the history of man, associated with fishing, hunting, and superstition in the beginning, and later with medicine and pharmacy. Over the ages, together with human progress, cosmetics have changed continuously and nowadays the cosmetic market is global and highly competitive, where terms such as quality, efficacy and safety are essential. Consumers’ demands are extremely sophisticated, and thus scientific research and product development have become vital to meet them. Moreover, consumers are aware about environmental and sustainability issues, and thus not harming the environment represents a key consideration when developing a new cosmetic ingredient. The latest tendencies of cosmetics are based on advanced research into how to interfere with skin cell aging: research includes the use of biotechnology-derived ingredients and the analysis of their effects on the biology of the cells, in terms of gene regulation, protein expression and enzymatic activity measures. In this review, we will provide some examples of cosmetic active ingredients developed through biotechnological systems, whose activity on the skin has been scientifically proved through in vitro and clinical studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficacy Assessment of Cosmetics)
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