Special Issue "Antipollution Cosmetics: Trends, Test and Issues"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Prashant Sawant

Chief Scientist, Intraceuticals Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria State, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanotechnology; cosmetics; regulatory; manufacturing; quality control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antipollution cosmetics are gaining momentum in the cosmetic world. China is leading the way in this field. Cosmetic ingredient manufacturers have been developing new antiotidants, film-formers, skin rejuvenating excipients, innovative technologies, etc. at rapid speeds. However, the key issues remain un-addressed, such as universal antipollution test methods to assess efficacy and safety of products, global regulatory requirements and development cost, which consumers need to pay. Additionally, this important challenge also creates opportunities for businesses, as well as research institutes. Academia-industry collaborations are needed for this emerging field.

Dr. Prashant Sawant
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antipollution
  • reactive oxygen species
  • oxidation
  • lipid layers
  • film former
  • devices

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Pollution Damage and Protection of Asian Hair
Received: 1 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 30 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018
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Abstract
Cigarette smoke was used to simulate a polluted environment and an experiment was performed to reveal how virgin and bleached hair are damaged by a polluted environment. The dry/wet combability, surface contact angle, tryptophan content, and cuticle morphology of the smoke exposed hair [...] Read more.
Cigarette smoke was used to simulate a polluted environment and an experiment was performed to reveal how virgin and bleached hair are damaged by a polluted environment. The dry/wet combability, surface contact angle, tryptophan content, and cuticle morphology of the smoke exposed hair were evaluated, and compared to unexposed virgin hair. The results showed that pollution exposure can cause significant chemical damage to hair. In particular, virgin hair exposure to pollution can cause damage to the hair cuticles (higher wet/dry combing), protein degradation, and a more hydrophilic hair surface. The experiment also demonstrated that the styling polymer, polyimide-1 (isobutylene/dimethyl amino propyl maleimide/ethoxylated maleimide/maleic acid copolymer), can provide effective protection against such hair damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antipollution Cosmetics: Trends, Test and Issues)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Equol’s Anti-Aging Effects Protect against Environmental Assaults by Increasing Skin Antioxidant Defense and ECM Proteins While Decreasing Oxidative Stress and Inflammation
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 16 January 2018 / Accepted: 22 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2426 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Environmental pollutants represent a major problem worldwide that cannot be passively avoided. It is known that skin sensitivities can result from environmental assaults, such as toxins and pollutants in air and water. Additionally, dermal assaults from wind and exposure to seasonal cold temperatures [...] Read more.
Environmental pollutants represent a major problem worldwide that cannot be passively avoided. It is known that skin sensitivities can result from environmental assaults, such as toxins and pollutants in air and water. Additionally, dermal assaults from wind and exposure to seasonal cold temperatures are known. All of these environmental assaults are associated with oxidative stress and the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which damage DNA, lipids, proteins and mitochondrial function. Additionally, the influence of diet on dermal health and, especially, antioxidant defense in skin function are well established. In this regard, environmental pollution worldwide has generated a high demand for anti-pollution personal care products to protect the skin against the daily exposure of airborne toxins and various other assaults. Major cosmetic companies have anti-pollution personal care products but, in general, the products are formulated with commonly used active ingredients that have been retooled with market strategies to address current environmental pollution treatments. Equol is a new botanical active ingredient compound for skin applications. It has a polyphenolic chemical structure found in plant and food products, and is also classified as an isoflavonoid. Moreover, equol appears to address the need for an active ingredient in personal care products to protect against pollution assaults by increasing antioxidant defense, while inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation. Separate sections covering equol’s enhanced (a) delivery mechanism into human skin; (b) antioxidant effects via Nrf2 activation; (c) effects on extracellular matrix proteins like collagen and elastin and; (d) protection against oxidative stress and inflammation are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antipollution Cosmetics: Trends, Test and Issues)
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Open AccessReview
Potential Use of Spin Traps to Control ROS in Antipollution Cosmetics—A Review
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 4 January 2018 / Accepted: 5 January 2018 / Published: 7 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1306 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pollution from air and sunlight has adverse effects on human health, particularly skin health. It creates oxidative stress, which results in skin diseases, including skin cancer and aging. Different types of antioxidants are used as preventative actives in skin-care products. However, they have [...] Read more.
Pollution from air and sunlight has adverse effects on human health, particularly skin health. It creates oxidative stress, which results in skin diseases, including skin cancer and aging. Different types of antioxidants are used as preventative actives in skin-care products. However, they have some limitations as they also scavenge oxygen. Recently, spin traps are being explored to trap free radicals before these radicals generating more free radicals (cascading effect) and not the oxygen molecules. However, not all spin traps can be used in the topical cosmetic skin-care products due to their toxicity and regulatory issues. The present review focuses on the different pathways of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation due to pollution and the potential use of spin traps in anti-pollution cosmetics to control ROS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antipollution Cosmetics: Trends, Test and Issues)
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Open AccessReview
The Impact of Pollution on Skin and Proper Efficacy Testing for Anti-Pollution Claims
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 26 December 2017 / Published: 2 January 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (491 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Exposure to pollution can cause oxidative stress, premature ageing, inflammation, and diseases. Since most of us are exposed to pollution, protection is important. This can be achieved through skin protection or through protection with respect to food and food supplements. There is a [...] Read more.
Exposure to pollution can cause oxidative stress, premature ageing, inflammation, and diseases. Since most of us are exposed to pollution, protection is important. This can be achieved through skin protection or through protection with respect to food and food supplements. There is a wide range of products on the market with anti-pollution claims. However, it is important that these claims are thoroughly validated by proper efficacy testing. When skin cells are exposed to pollution factors, changes in a number of skin properties can be observed, such as lipid composition, lipid and protein oxidation, pH, sebum secretion rate, oxidative stress, inflammation markers, and collagen and elastin levels. These can be measured and used as markers to verify anti-pollution claims. In the present review, we summarize some of the most important in vitro and in vivo tests that are used to determine if an ingredient or formulation has anti-pollution efficacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antipollution Cosmetics: Trends, Test and Issues)
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Open AccessReview
Guidelines for Formulating Anti-Pollution Products
Received: 27 October 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 13 December 2017 / Published: 18 December 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (531 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Anti-pollution skin care and cosmetic products are witnessing a significant growth in the last couple of years due to worsening air quality across the world, and increasing awareness and concern regarding the adverse impact of various environmental pollutants on skin. The various pollutants, [...] Read more.
Anti-pollution skin care and cosmetic products are witnessing a significant growth in the last couple of years due to worsening air quality across the world, and increasing awareness and concern regarding the adverse impact of various environmental pollutants on skin. The various pollutants, like particulate matter, oxides of nitrogen and sulphur, ozone, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons damage skin by different mechanism resulting in skin dryness, loss of firmness, dark spots, uneven skin tone, fine lines and wrinkles, aggravation of acne, and inflammation. The task of developing globally harmonized products is very challenging due differences in skin types according to ethnicity, variation in seasonal weather pattern, differences in benefit expectations, and variances in personal care and cosmetics usage habits of consumers in different regions of the world. However, an increasing understanding about the mechanism by which various pollutants damage the skin manifesting into various extrinsic signs of skin damage and development of various actives that counter the impact of different environmental aggressors has helped formulators to develop different products and to establish efficacy by in vitro and in vivo tests. The article summarizes approaches for formulation development, and a list of few actives classified based in their mechanism action is given. A representative list of products based on their mechanism of action is also given and few potential opportunities for the future are suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antipollution Cosmetics: Trends, Test and Issues)
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