Alternative Methods for Safety Assessment of Cosmetics

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (19 January 2022) | Viewed by 9422

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677, USA
Interests: alternative methods; skin sensitization; essential oils; green ingredients; botanicals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Assistant Director, NCNPR, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677, USA
Interests: skin sensitization; in-silico and in-chemic methods; chemical reactivity; complex mixtures; and hyphenated analytical methods

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Guest Editor
Dermatochemistry Laboratory, University of Strasbourg, Institute of Chemistry, CNRS UMR 7177, Strasbourg, France
Interests: skin allergy; hapten-protein interactions; radical-mediated mechanisms in dermatological oxidation events

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to the application of non-animal methods for the testing of cosmetic ingredients. Changes in regulatory trends worldwide have been pushing the progress and application of non-animal strategies to evaluate the safety of cosmetic ingredients by reducing, replacing, and refining the use of animal models. In this Special Issue, we welcome research papers and reviews on the state of non-animal methods, their application, and challenges. With an increased interest in natural ingredients and the CBD hype, manuscripts covering the safety of natural products are particularly welcomed. 

Dr. Cristina Avonto
Dr. Amar Gopal Chittiboyina
Dr. Elena Gimenez-Arnau
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alternative methods
  • safety assessment
  • integrated strategies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

10 pages, 256 KiB  
Review
Skin Sensitization Testing: The Ascendancy of Non-Animal Methods
by David A. Basketter and George F. Gerberick
Cosmetics 2022, 9(2), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics9020038 - 29 Mar 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4528
Abstract
A century ago, toxicology was an empirical science identifying substance hazards in surrogate mammalian models. Over several decades, these models improved, evolved to reduce animal usage, and recently have begun the process of dispensing with animals entirely. However, despite good hazard identification, the [...] Read more.
A century ago, toxicology was an empirical science identifying substance hazards in surrogate mammalian models. Over several decades, these models improved, evolved to reduce animal usage, and recently have begun the process of dispensing with animals entirely. However, despite good hazard identification, the translation of hazards into adequately assessed risks to human health often has presented challenges. Unfortunately, many skin sensitizers known to produce contact allergy in humans, despite being readily identified as such in the predictive assays, continue to cause this adverse health effect. Increasing the rigour of hazard identification is inappropriate. Regulatory action has only proven effective via complete bans of individual substances. Since the problem applies to a broad range of substances and industry categories, and since generic banning of skin sensitizers would be an economic catastrophe, the solution is surprisingly simple—they should be subject to rigorous safety assessment, with the risks thereby managed accordingly. The ascendancy of non-animal methods in skin sensitization is giving unparalleled opportunities in which toxicologists, risk assessors, and regulators can work in concert to achieve a better outcome for the protection of human health than has been delivered by the in vivo methods and associated regulations that they are replacing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Methods for Safety Assessment of Cosmetics)
12 pages, 1150 KiB  
Review
True Grit: A Story of Perseverance Making Two Out of Three the First Non-Animal Testing Strategy (Adopted as OECD Guideline No. 497)
by Annette Mehling, Susanne N. Kolle, Britta Wareing and Robert Landsiedel
Cosmetics 2022, 9(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics9010022 - 5 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4108
Abstract
In the last two decades, great strides have been made in developing alternative methods to animal testing for regulatory and safety testing. In 2021, a breakthrough in regulatory testing was achieved in that the first test strategies employing non-animal test methods for skin [...] Read more.
In the last two decades, great strides have been made in developing alternative methods to animal testing for regulatory and safety testing. In 2021, a breakthrough in regulatory testing was achieved in that the first test strategies employing non-animal test methods for skin sensitization have been accepted as OECD guideline 497, which falls under the mutual acceptance of data (MAD) by OECD member states. Achieving this goal was a story of hard work and perseverance of the many people involved. This review gives an overview of some of the many aspects and timelines this entailed—just from the perspective of one stakeholder. In the end, the true grit of all involved allowed us to achieve not only a way forward in using test strategies for skin sensitization, but also a new approach to address other complex toxicological effects without the use of animals in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Methods for Safety Assessment of Cosmetics)
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