Special Issue "Surface Modification of Medical Implants"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactive Coatings and Biointerfaces".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alina Vladescu
Website
Guest Editor
Department for Advanced Surface Processing and Analysis by Vacuum Technologies, National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor St., 077125 Magurele-Bucharest, Romania
Interests: surface functionalization; biocompatible and bioactive coatings; corrosion-wear resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The mechanism of implant failure is nowadays the target of intensive research, aiming to increase implant’s service life, since bone fixation devices and artificial joints comprise 44% of all medical devices. The results obtained world-wide in the last 15 years have demonstrated that the most important causes of artificial joint loosening are due to implant infection, osseointegration, degradation, friction, and abrasive wear. Thus, many efforts have been directed towards finding a solution to obtain a new implant with good mechanical, osseoconductive, and antibacterial properties, and good resistance to wear and corrosion (low friction coefficient and wear rate in the solution specific to the human body). One of prospective ways is to induce the surface modification of common medical implants in order to obtain the desired properties for clinical applications. Currently, several techniques have been developed for preparing biocompatible coatings, such as plasma spray, sol–gel, micro-arc oxidation, electrodeposition, anodization, plasma electrolytic oxidation, magnetron sputtering, and pulsed laser deposition, etc. The main goal of this Special Issue is to present the latest developments in the field of the surface modification of medical implants for enhancing the specific functionality in human aggressive media.

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Surface science of bioactive coatings
  • Deposition and growth of biocompatible coatings
  • Coatings-based polymers
  • Surface modification by directed energy deposition (lasers, ion, or electron beams) or other techniques such as plasmas
  • Friction performance, corrosion, and wear resistance of coated load-bearing implants and/or dental implants

Dr. Alina Vladescu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparison of the Clinical Results of Identically Designed Total Knee Prostheses with Different Surface Roughnesses
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 486; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050486 - 19 May 2020
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the undersurface roughness of total knee prosthesis on clinical outcomes. We compared the clinical and radiological outcomes and prosthesis survivals in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty using prosthesis with identical designs [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the undersurface roughness of total knee prosthesis on clinical outcomes. We compared the clinical and radiological outcomes and prosthesis survivals in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty using prosthesis with identical designs but different surface roughness (average surface roughnesses (Ra), 5.0 μm vs. 11.6 μm). The results showed that the knee prostheses with a more roughened undersurface (Ra = 11.6 μm) produced significantly better functional results and enhanced prosthesis survival. The difference in surface roughness was associated with incidence of osteolysis and loosening at the tibial baseplate, but not at the femoral component. Overall, our results provided significant evidence that the use of roughened undersurface of tibial baseplate would be a way to prevent aseptic loosening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Modification of Medical Implants)
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Open AccessArticle
In Vitro Activity Assays of Sputtered HAp Coatings with SiC Addition in Various Simulated Biological Fluids
Coatings 2019, 9(6), 389; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9060389 - 15 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Considering the requirements of medical implantable devices, it is pointed out that biomaterials should play a more sophisticated, longer-term role in the customization and optimization of the material–tissue interface in order to ensure the best long-term clinical outcomes. The aim of this contribution [...] Read more.
Considering the requirements of medical implantable devices, it is pointed out that biomaterials should play a more sophisticated, longer-term role in the customization and optimization of the material–tissue interface in order to ensure the best long-term clinical outcomes. The aim of this contribution was to assess the performance of silicon carbide–hydroxyapatite in various simulated biological fluids (Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM), simulated body fluid (SBF), and phosphate buffer solution (PBS)) through immersion assays for 21 days at 37 ± 0.5 °C and to evaluate the electrochemical behavior. The coatings were prepared on Ti6Al4V alloy substrates by magnetron sputtering method using two cathodes made of hydroxyapatite and silicon carbide (SiC). After immersion assays the coating’s surface was analyzed in terms of morphology, chemical and phase composition, and chemical bonds. According to the electrochemical behavior in the media investigated at 37 ± 0.5 °C, SiC addition inhibits the dissolution of the hydroxyapatite in DMEM acellular media. Furthermore, after adding SiC, the slow degradation of hydroxyapatite in PBS and SBF media as well as biomineralization in DMEM were observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Modification of Medical Implants)
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