Special Issue "Low-Adhesion Coatings: Fundamentals and Applications"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Miguel Ángel Rodríguez-Valverde
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Tel. +34-958243229
Interests: wetting and drop dynamics; durable functional coatings with low(high)-adhesion properties for real-life applications; release (demoulding) coatings; anti-icing coatings; bioadhesive surfaces
Prof. Dr. Agustín R. González-Elipe
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-Univ. Sevilla), Avda. Américo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla, Spain
Tel. +34-954489528
Interests: deposition, growth and application of thin films prepared by vacuum and plasma techniques; other functional plasma coatings and supported nanostructures with applications as sensors, optical devices, wetting control, icephobic coatings, microfluidics, fuel cells and other energy related problems; plasma catalysis constitutes at present another topic of interest

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite researchers to submit original innovative research works to this Special Issue on "Low-Adhesion Coatings: Fundamentals and Applications". Low-adhesion surfaces reveal a minimum affinity to certain pure liquids, complex liquids or solids (even gases), allowing for the liquid/solid to slide off or to release readily. Beyond superhydrophobicity, a pleiad of terms is used to refer, accordingly, to the abilities of low-adhesion surfaces such as superoleophobicity, superomniphobicity/superamphiphobicity, liquid repellency, icephobicity, superaerophobicity, etc. Surfaces that reveal a low shear-adhesion with certain liquids (drop mobility) behave as adhesives for other liquids or solids. The rational design of low-adhesion surfaces with longer service life and minor maintenance costs involves exciting interdisciplinary scientific challenges and their incipient scaling-up to industrial applications is coming. We expect to collect works aimed to provide insights into this complex phenomenon and to the preparation and performance of long-lasting low-adhesion surfaces, according to their prospective function: aeronautics, ice industry, aerogenerators (anti-icing/de-icing coatings), automotive, footwear, die casting, cookware/bakeware (demolding/release performance, anti-corrosion), textile, optics (self-cleaning, anti-fogging), naval (anti-biofouling), urban cleaning and heritage maintenance (anti-graffiti coatings). Exploratory, bio-inspired and disruptive studies may be also submitted, as a point of departure for future innovative and efficient solutions.

Dr. Miguel Ángel Rodríguez-Valverde
Prof. Dr. Agustín R. González-Elipe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Aging of Solvent-Casting PLA-Mg Hydrophobic Films: Impact on Bacterial Adhesion and Viability
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 814; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120814 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
Biomaterials used for the manufacture of biomedical devices must have suitable surface properties avoiding bacterial colonization and/or proliferation. Most biomaterial-related infections start during the surgery. Bacteria can begin colonization of the surface of a device right after implantation or in the next few [...] Read more.
Biomaterials used for the manufacture of biomedical devices must have suitable surface properties avoiding bacterial colonization and/or proliferation. Most biomaterial-related infections start during the surgery. Bacteria can begin colonization of the surface of a device right after implantation or in the next few hours. This time may also be sufficient to begin the deterioration of a biodegradable implant. This work explores the surface changes that hydrophobic films of poly(lactic) acid reinforced with Mg particles, prepared by solving-casting, undergone after in vitro degradation at different times. Hydrophobicity, surface tension, zeta potential, topography, and elemental composition were obtained from new and aged films. The initial degradation for 4 h was combined with unspecific bacterial adhesion and viability tests to check if degraded films are more or less susceptible to be contaminated. The degradation of the films decreases their hydrophobicity and causes the appearance of a biocompatible layer, composed mainly of magnesium phosphate. The release of Mg2+ is very acute at the beginning of the degradation process, and such positive charges may favor the electrostatic approach and attachment of Staphylococci. However, all bacteria attached on the films containing Mg particles appeared damaged, ensuring the bacteriostatic effect of these films, even after the first hours of their degradation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Adhesion Coatings: Fundamentals and Applications)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Hydrophobic and Icephobic Behaviour of Polyurethane-Based Nanocomposite Coatings
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 811; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120811 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
In this paper, hydrophobic nanocomposite coatings based on polyurethane (PUR) modified by nano-silica and silane-based compounds were manufactured by spraying. The main challenge was to assess and improve the hydrophobic as well as anti-icing properties of initially hydrophilic polymer coatings. The prepared nanocomposite [...] Read more.
In this paper, hydrophobic nanocomposite coatings based on polyurethane (PUR) modified by nano-silica and silane-based compounds were manufactured by spraying. The main challenge was to assess and improve the hydrophobic as well as anti-icing properties of initially hydrophilic polymer coatings. The prepared nanocomposite coatings were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical profilometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results obtained showed that in order to achieve hydrophobicity, appropriate amounts of nano-silica must be incorporated in the coating, and complete coverage by nano-silica particles is necessary for achieving hydrophobicity. Coating adhesion and the durability of the hydrophobic behaviour were also studied by scratch test and frosting/defrosting cycles, respectively. The results show that use of both nano-silica and silane-based compounds improve the hydrophobic and anti-icing properties of the coating as compared to a non-modified PUR topcoat. A synergistic effect of both additives was observed. It was also found that the anti-icing behaviour does not necessarily correlate with surface roughness and the materials’ wetting properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Adhesion Coatings: Fundamentals and Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Superhydrophobic Cerium-Based Coatings on Al-Mg Alloys and Aluminized Steel
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120774 - 20 Nov 2019
Abstract
Aluminum-magnesium (Al-Mg) alloy and aluminum-coated steel (aluminized steel) are typically used for the manufacturing of baking trays and molds. For these applications, these materials must be modified to develop release and hydrophobic properties. With this aim, the bare substrates are typically coated with [...] Read more.
Aluminum-magnesium (Al-Mg) alloy and aluminum-coated steel (aluminized steel) are typically used for the manufacturing of baking trays and molds. For these applications, these materials must be modified to develop release and hydrophobic properties. With this aim, the bare substrates are typically coated with low-surface energy materials such as fluoropolymers, elastomers, or sol-gel layers. In this work, some alternative strategies to prepare these functional surfaces are presented. We used three-step processes involving (i) micro-texturing, (ii) nano layer deposition through immersion and electrodeposition, and (iii) hydrophobization. The raw substrates were sanded or sandblasted at the micro scale, accordingly. Texturization at the nano scale was achieved with a cerium layer formed by electrodeposition or solution immersion. The cerium layers were hydrophobized with fatty acids. The wetting properties of the samples were studied with tilting-plate and bouncing drop methods. We measured the surface roughness of the samples by contact profiling and analyzed their surface morphology using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The elemental chemical composition of the samples was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The wettability results indicated that the best performance for the Al-Mg substrates was reached by sandblasting and later immersion in a cerium nitrate solution. For aluminized steel substrates, the best results were obtained with both electrodeposition and immersion methods using a cerium chloride solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Adhesion Coatings: Fundamentals and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Epidermal Gland Inspired Self-Repairing Slippery Lubricant-Infused Porous Coatings with Durable Low Ice Adhesion
Coatings 2019, 9(10), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9100602 - 24 Sep 2019
Abstract
The limited durability of slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) restricts their practical applications. Inspired by the epidermal glands of skins, we developed a facile approach to durable SLIPS with gland-like storage and release functions for icephobicity. By introducing a hybrid surfactant as a [...] Read more.
The limited durability of slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) restricts their practical applications. Inspired by the epidermal glands of skins, we developed a facile approach to durable SLIPS with gland-like storage and release functions for icephobicity. By introducing a hybrid surfactant as a lubricant into the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix, lubricant capsules were formed and mono-dispersed in the matrix, working as gland-like structures to release lubricant. The obtained SLIPS showed durable low ice adhesion strength and thermal durability simultaneously. In detail, the enhanced durability for icephobicity was demonstrated by 20 icing/deicing tests, in which the lubricant remains on the surface; the coatings showed negligible weight loss when stored at 100 °C for 60 h, displaying pronounced thermal durability of the slippery effect. Our current strategy sheds new light on a facile fabrication of mechanically and thermally durable SLIPS for icephobicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Adhesion Coatings: Fundamentals and Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Superhydrophobic Civil Engineering Materials: A Review from Recent Developments
Coatings 2019, 9(11), 753; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9110753 - 13 Nov 2019
Abstract
Superhydrophobic surfaces have drawn attention from scientists and engineers because of their extreme water repellency. More interestingly, these surfaces have also demonstrated an infinite influence on civil engineering materials. In this feature article, the history of wettability theory is described firstly. The approaches [...] Read more.
Superhydrophobic surfaces have drawn attention from scientists and engineers because of their extreme water repellency. More interestingly, these surfaces have also demonstrated an infinite influence on civil engineering materials. In this feature article, the history of wettability theory is described firstly. The approaches to construct hierarchical micro/nanostructures such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD), electrochemical, etching, and flame synthesis methods are introduced. Then, the advantages and limitations of each method are discussed. Furthermore, the recent progress of superhydrophobicity applied on civil engineering materials and its applications are summarized. Finally, the obstacles and prospects of superhydrophobic civil engineering materials are stated and expected. This review should be of interest to scientists and civil engineers who are interested in superhydrophobic surfaces and novel civil engineering materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Adhesion Coatings: Fundamentals and Applications)
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