Coatings for Antimicrobial Textiles

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Coatings for Biomedicine and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 13924

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Biochemistry Laboratory, School of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece
Interests: biochemistry; biotechnology

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Guest Editor
Laboratory Teaching Staff Member, Biochemistry Laboratory, School of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece
Interests: biochemistry; biotechnology

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Guest Editor
Department of Creative Design and Clothing, International Hellenic University, Nea Moudania 57001, Greece
Interests: textile technology; fiber technology

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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Pharmacy, School of Life Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece
Interests: mareial Science; polymer science; pharmaceutical technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The new SARS-CoV-2 pandemic outbreak and other infectious diseases have revealed the necessity for the development of novel materials that could serve as a means of protection against infections by decreasing viral availability, viability and infectivity. The application of these materials for the preparation and functionalization of fabrics would be of great benefit, as these textiles could offer protection to the general population and to healthcare professionals by improving the lifespan and overall performance of textile products.

Textiles are one of the most widely used materials worldwide. They are an integral part of everyday life, and include clothing, home and upholstery textiles, and medical, automotive, packaging and industrial textiles.

Textile products, particularly those made from natural fibres, are able to retain a lot of moisture, making them more susceptible to microbial growth. These microorganisms attack the clothes and cause irreversible damage. This growth can lead to several problems that directly affect the end-user, extending from unpleasant odour to compromised mechanical strength and the discolouration of the fabric. However, the most critical impact is not on the material itself, but on the exposed end-user, who can fall victim to possible contamination. Antimicrobial textiles, commonly called biotextiles, are functionally active textiles that kill microorganisms (biocides) or inhibit their growth (biostatic) using synthetic and natural antimicrobial compounds. The techniques of electrospinning and plasma technology coupled with nanotechnology are common methods used to create effective biocides.

Research in this area can potentially become an asset, particularly in medical applications, both for home and point-of-care applications. The latter should heighten public health awareness and intensify scientific efforts to minimise the growth of microbes in fabrics and their potential for the transmission of infections in medical and healthcare environments. During the last few decades, a steady rise in demand for antimicrobial products has led to an increase in their production to about 30,000 and 100,000 tonnes annually in Western Europe and globally, respectively.

This, as well as the new SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, has made consumers aware of the possible direct and indirect implications of textile-originated bacterial infection for their health. This Special Issue aims to highlight new research, new technologies and novel materials that are used to develop antimicrobial coatings for textiles. The scientific area covered includes all the potential applications of antimicrobial textiles, from commercial products that aimed at the general population to specialised fabrics and textiles for medical and healthcare professionals.

Prof. Dr. Theodora Choli-Papadopoulou
Dr. Rigini M. Papi
Dr. Michalis Karypidis
Dr. Eleftherios G. Andriotis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial
  • functional coatings
  • textiles
  • fibers
  • finishes

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 7522 KiB  
Article
Development of Antimicrobial Microcapsules of Saffron Petal Essential Oil by Condensation Method and Its Excellent Binding on Cotton Fibers
by Su Liu, Liuxin Shi, Mengyun Liu, Wei Chen, Qiang Cheng and Xiuli Song
Coatings 2023, 13(4), 714; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13040714 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1889
Abstract
In recent years, textiles with antimicrobial properties have attracted more and more attention. As natural antimicrobial agents, essential oils’ potential application value lies in their ability to provide textiles with antimicrobial functions. In this paper, organic solvent extraction (n-hexane, petroleum ether, ethanol) and [...] Read more.
In recent years, textiles with antimicrobial properties have attracted more and more attention. As natural antimicrobial agents, essential oils’ potential application value lies in their ability to provide textiles with antimicrobial functions. In this paper, organic solvent extraction (n-hexane, petroleum ether, ethanol) and steam distillation were used to extract saffron petal essential oil (SPEO). It was found that organic solvent extraction (ethanol) had the highest extraction rate and the most apparent bacteriostatic effect. SPEO-Ms were prepared using the composite condensation method with gelatin and chitosan. The microstructure, encapsulation efficiency, slow-release performance, infrared spectrum, and thermal stability of the SPEO-Ms were evaluated. The results showed that the microencapsulated essential oil had good bacteriostatic properties. Antimicrobial cotton fabric was prepared by impregnating microcapsules onto cotton fibers. The effects of the microcapsules’ concentration on the whiteness, air permeability, moisture permeability, and bacteriological inhibition of the fabric were investigated. The results revealed that SPEO-Ms have the potential to be used as a new antimicrobial agent in textiles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Antimicrobial Textiles)
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21 pages, 4801 KiB  
Article
Copper-Treated Environmentally Friendly Antipathogenic Cotton Fabric with Modified Reactive Blue 4 Dye to Improve Its Antibacterial and Aesthetic Properties
by Muhammad Shahid, Azam Ali, Nageena Zahid, Muhammad Shahzad Anjam, Jiri Militky, Jakub Wiener, Sundaramoorthy Palanisamy and Blanka Tomkova
Coatings 2023, 13(1), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13010133 - 10 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2189
Abstract
The objectives of the present study were to develop an environmentally friendly, low-price, easy, and fast method for developing antipathogenic (antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral) cuprous-oxide-coated multifunctional fabrics. The fabrics were first sensitized with citric acid, and then Cu2O particles were formed [...] Read more.
The objectives of the present study were to develop an environmentally friendly, low-price, easy, and fast method for developing antipathogenic (antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral) cuprous-oxide-coated multifunctional fabrics. The fabrics were first sensitized with citric acid, and then Cu2O particles were formed using the Fehling solution method. The cuprous oxide particles were then applied to the cotton fabrics. To create the Cu2O particles, three different kinds of reducing agents with varying concentrations were used. SEM, dynamic light scattering, FTIR, EDS, and XRD were used to examine the surface morphologies and metal presences. In the second step, a reactive antibacterial dye was made (by reacting Reactive Blue 4 with triclosan). The molecular structure of the modified dye was confirmed with FTIR. The resultant antibacterial dye was applied on the copper-treated cotton fabrics in accordance with the exhaust dyeing protocol. The dyed fabrics were characterized through the colorimetric data (L*, a*, b*, C, H, and K/S), levelness of dye, fastness properties as well as exhaustion and fixation rates. Cuprous-oxide-coated fabrics were tested for antipathogenic activity using quantitative and qualitative measurement results. The fabrics treated with cuprous oxide particles reduced with sodium hydrosulfite at 1 g/L seemed to have the highest antipathogenic effect. Moreover, the versatility of the hygienically developed bioactive fabrics in terms of their comfort properties such as air permeability and stiffness were investigated. Finally, the coating’s durability was confirmed by evaluating its antibacterial properties and performing an SEM analysis after laundry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Antimicrobial Textiles)
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10 pages, 603 KiB  
Article
Adsorption Capacity of Plastic Foils Suitable for Barrier Resuscitation
by Philipp Holczmann, Wolfgang Lederer, Markus Isser, Andreas Klinger, Simone Jürschik, Helmut Wiesenhofer, Chris A. Mayhew and Veronika Ruzsanyi
Coatings 2022, 12(10), 1545; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12101545 - 14 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1407
Abstract
Chest compressions and ventilation attempts can generate aerosols during resuscitation. It is important to determine whether different materials suitable for the blanketing of cardiac arrest patients can diminish exposure to aerosols. In this study, three volatile organic compounds, ethanol, acetone, and isoprene, commonly [...] Read more.
Chest compressions and ventilation attempts can generate aerosols during resuscitation. It is important to determine whether different materials suitable for the blanketing of cardiac arrest patients can diminish exposure to aerosols. In this study, three volatile organic compounds, ethanol, acetone, and isoprene, commonly found in human breath in moistened air, acted as substitutes for aerosols. Here, we present information on the adsorption of these volatiles to three blanketing materials: polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene, and aluminum coated polyethylene terephthalate. After exposure to the surfaces of these materials the test volatiles were quantified by the proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry. There was a trend towards a potentially higher reduction for acetone (p = 0.071) and isoprene (p = 0.050) on polyethylene, compared to polyvinyl chloride and aluminum coated polyethylene terephthalate during the rise interval. Adsorption capacity did not differ between the foils and was between 67% and 70%. From our studies, we propose that the aluminum-coated polyethylene terephthalate surface of space blankets prove adequate to diminish exposure to volatiles in moistened air, and hence to aerosols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Antimicrobial Textiles)
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Review

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22 pages, 1407 KiB  
Review
A Mini-Review of Synthetic Organic and Nanoparticle Antimicrobial Agents for Coatings in Textile Applications
by Michail Karypidis, Evangelos Karanikas, Aikaterini Papadaki and Eleftherios G. Andriotis
Coatings 2023, 13(4), 693; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13040693 - 28 Mar 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2412
Abstract
Many synthetic compounds have been applied to impart antimicrobial properties to fabrics. In this review, the types of bacteria are described. Furthermore, synthetic antimicrobial agents, namely quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), triclosan, and nitrogen-halamines (N-halamines), are discussed along with their properties, [...] Read more.
Many synthetic compounds have been applied to impart antimicrobial properties to fabrics. In this review, the types of bacteria are described. Furthermore, synthetic antimicrobial agents, namely quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), triclosan, and nitrogen-halamines (N-halamines), are discussed along with their properties, their advantages and disadvantages. Although synthetic antimicrobial agents neutralise microorganisms, some adversely affect the environment, safety and health. These problems led to a novel generation of antimicrobial coating treatments on textiles, such as copper nanoparticles (CNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) formed on plant extracts, chitosan and green synthesis, with a lower environmental impact but unaltered premium antimicrobial performance and improved durability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Antimicrobial Textiles)
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15 pages, 4764 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances of Sustainable Textile Fabric Coatings for UV Protection Properties
by Nour F. Attia, Rokaya Osama, Sally E. A. Elashery, Abul Kalam, Abdullah G. Al-Sehemi and Hamed Algarni
Coatings 2022, 12(10), 1597; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12101597 - 21 Oct 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4802
Abstract
The rapid progress in the use of textile fabric materials in various industrial and domestic applications requires the inclusion of smart functions to achieve comfortable and safety properties to the end users. However, among these functions is the protection against harmful UV rays [...] Read more.
The rapid progress in the use of textile fabric materials in various industrial and domestic applications requires the inclusion of smart functions to achieve comfortable and safety properties to the end users. However, among these functions is the protection against harmful UV rays that cause harmful effects to human beings and textile materials. To this end, coatings for smart textile fabrics have to be incorporated into textile fabrics. Therefore, in this review, recent advances in the development of coatings for sustainable textile fabrics for UV protection will be reviewed. Hence, the precursors, the synthesis routes and the types of coatings for sustainable textile fabrics will be reviewed. Furthermore, the UV protection action of the coatings for the protection of textile fabrics will be covered and studied. Interestingly, the multifunctional effect of the treated coatings, such as the antibacterial properties of the developed textile fabrics, will be also studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Antimicrobial Textiles)
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