Special Issue "Advanced Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Coatings"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Yuelian Liu
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Oral Implantology and Prosthetic Dentistry Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), VU University of Amsterdam, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Tel. +31 20 5980626
Interests: biomimetic coating; osteointergration; bone regeneration; bone growth factors; drug delivery; tissue engineering; calcium phosphate; implant dentistry; implant surface modification

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings have been developed for bone regeneration and repair because of their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and easy preparation. They can be rendered osteoinductive by incorporating an osteogenic agent, such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), into the crystalline lattice work in physiological situations. The biomimetic calcium phosphate coating enables a controlled, slow and local release of growth factors when it undergoes cell mediated coating degradation induced by multinuclear cells, such as osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells, which mimics a physiologically similar release mode. The goal of this Special Issue is to present the major current areas of research and development in biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings for biomaterials; the coating techniques, physic-chemical properties, potential as drug carrier should be discussed; the peri-clinical research results and the clinical related applications in implant dentistry as well as in orthopedics will be discussed. The advanced coatings may open a line for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Dr. Yuelian Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomimetic
  • calcium phosphate coating
  • hydroxyapatite
  • drug delivery
  • osseoconduction
  • osseoinduction
  • pre-clinical study
  • clinical application
  • animal model
  • osteointergration
  • bone regeneration
  • bone growth factors
  • tissue engineering
  • calcium phosphate
  • implant dentistry
  • implant surface modification

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Biodegradable Ceramics Consisting of Hydroxyapatite for Orthopaedic Implants
Coatings 2017, 7(11), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7110184 - 03 Nov 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
This study aims to analyze hydroxyapatite (HAP) coatings enriched with Mg and Ti prepared by a magnetron sputtering technique on Ti6Al4V substrate. For preparation of the coatings, three magnetron targets (HAP, MgO and TiO2) were simultaneously co-worked. The concentration of Mg [...] Read more.
This study aims to analyze hydroxyapatite (HAP) coatings enriched with Mg and Ti prepared by a magnetron sputtering technique on Ti6Al4V substrate. For preparation of the coatings, three magnetron targets (HAP, MgO and TiO2) were simultaneously co-worked. The concentration of Mg added was varied by modifying the power applied to the MgO target. In all coatings, the Ti concentration was maintained constant by keeping the same cathode power fed during the whole deposition. The influence of different Mg dopant contents on the formation of phase, microstructure and morphology of the obtained Ti-doped HAP coatings were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the effects of Mg addition upon corrosion, mechanical and biological properties were also investigated. Mg- and Ti-doped HAP coating obtained at low radio-frequency (RF) power fed to the MgO target provided material with high corrosion resistance compared to other coatings and bare alloy. A slight decrease in hardness of the coatings was found after the Mg addition, from 8.8 to 5.7 GPa. Also, the values of elastic modulus were decreased from 87 to 53 GPa, this being an advantage for biomedical applications. The coatings with low Mg concentration proved to have good deformation to yielding and higher plastic properties. Biological test results showed that the novel surfaces exhibited excellent properties for the adhesion and growth of bone cells. Moreover, early adherent vital cell numbers were significantly higher on both coatings compared to Ti6Al4V, suggesting that Mg ions may accelerate initial osteoblast adhesion and proliferation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation of Hydroxyapatite/Tannic Acid Coating to Enhance the Corrosion Resistance and Cytocompatibility of AZ31 Magnesium Alloys
Coatings 2017, 7(7), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7070105 - 20 Jul 2017
Cited by 13
Abstract
Hydroxyapatite/tannic acid coating (HA/TA) were prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloys (AZ31) via chemical conversion and biomimetic methods. The characterization and properties of the coating were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), corrosion testing, MC3T3-E1 cell [...] Read more.
Hydroxyapatite/tannic acid coating (HA/TA) were prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloys (AZ31) via chemical conversion and biomimetic methods. The characterization and properties of the coating were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), corrosion testing, MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation assay, and MC3T3-E1 cell morphology observation. The results showed that tannic acid as an inducer increased the number of nucleation centers of hydroxyapatite and rendered the morphology more uniform. Compared to bare AZ31 magnesium (Mg) alloys (Ecorr = −1.462 ± 0.006 V, Icorr = (4.8978 ± 0.2455) × 10−6 A/cm2), the corrosion current density of the HA/TA-coated magnesium alloys ((5.6494 ± 0.3187) × 10−8 A/cm2) decreased two orders of magnitude, and the corrosion potential of the HA/TA-coated Mg alloys (Ecorr = −1.304 ± 0.006 V) increased by about 158 mV. This indicated that the HA/TA coating was effectively protecting the AZ31 against corrosion in simulated body fluid (SBF). Cell proliferation assays and cell morphology observations results showed that the HA/TA coating was not toxic to the MC3T3-E1 cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Coatings)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Review of Antibacterial Activity of Titanium-Based Implants’ Surfaces Fabricated by Micro-Arc Oxidation
Coatings 2017, 7(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7030045 - 22 Mar 2017
Cited by 18
Abstract
Ti and its alloys are the most commonly-used materials for biomedical applications. However, bacterial infection after implant placement is still one of the significant rising complications. Therefore, the application of the antimicrobial agents into implant surfaces to prevent implant-associated infection has attracted much [...] Read more.
Ti and its alloys are the most commonly-used materials for biomedical applications. However, bacterial infection after implant placement is still one of the significant rising complications. Therefore, the application of the antimicrobial agents into implant surfaces to prevent implant-associated infection has attracted much attention. Scientific papers have shown that inorganic antibacterial metal elements (e.g., Ag, Cu, Zn) can be introduced into implant surfaces with the addition of metal nanoparticles or metallic compounds into an electrolyte via micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technology. In this review, the effects of the composition and concentration of electrolyte and process parameters (e.g., voltage, current density, oxidation time) on the morphological characteristics (e.g., surface morphology, bonding strength), antibacterial ability and biocompatibility of MAO antimicrobial coatings are discussed in detail. Anti-infection and osseointegration can be simultaneously accomplished with the selection of the proper antibacterial elements and operating parameters. Besides, MAO assisted by magnetron sputtering (MS) to endow Ti-based implant materials with superior antibacterial ability and biocompatibility is also discussed. Finally, the development trend of MAO technology in the future is forecasted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Coatings)
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Open AccessReview
Novel Development of Biocompatible Coatings for Bone Implants
Coatings 2015, 5(4), 737-757; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5040737 - 30 Oct 2015
Cited by 12
Abstract
Prolonged life expectancy also results in an increased need for high-performance orthopedic implants. It has been shown that a compromised tissue-implant interface could lead to adverse immune-responses and even the dislodging of the implant. To overcome these obstacles, our research team has been [...] Read more.
Prolonged life expectancy also results in an increased need for high-performance orthopedic implants. It has been shown that a compromised tissue-implant interface could lead to adverse immune-responses and even the dislodging of the implant. To overcome these obstacles, our research team has been seeking ways to decrease the risk of faulty tissue-implant interfaces by improving the biocompatibility and the osteo-inductivity of conventional orthopedic implants using ultrafine particle coatings. These particles were enriched with various bioactive additives prior to coating, and the coated biomaterial surfaces exhibited significantly increased biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. Physical assessments firstly confirmed the proper incorporation of the bioactive additives after examining their surface chemical composition. Then, in vitro assays demonstrated the biocompatibility and osteo-inductivity of the coated surfaces by studying the morphology of attached cells and their mineralization abilities. In addition, by quantifying the responses, activities and gene expressions, cellular evaluations confirmed the positive effects of these polymer based bioactive coatings. Consequently, the bioactive ultrafine polymer particles demonstrated their ability in improving the biocompatibility and osteo-inductivity of conventional orthopedic implants. As a result, our research team hope to apply this technology to the field of orthopedic implants by making them more effective medical devices through decreasing the risk of implant-induced immune responses and the loosening of the implant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Coatings)
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