Environmentally-Friendly Coatings towards Biofouling Control and Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) Inhibition

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactive Coatings and Biointerfaces".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 6619

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. BioISI - Biosystems & Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
2. Departamento de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: antifouling strategies; non-toxic antifouling coatings; microbially influenced corrosion inhibition strategies; immobilization of bioactive agents in polymeric matrices; catalytic processes for bioremediation and pollutants remediation (VOCs, pesticides)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil, Mining and Environmental Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
Interests: microbiologically influenced concrete corrosion; bio-concrete; corrosion-resistant concrete; sewer corrosion and odour management; corrosion processes; free nitrous acid; environmental microbiology; biocorrosion testing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antifouling coatings play vital roles in several industries for the prevention and/or control of biofouling attachments and growth on submerged surfaces. Undesired bio-attachments have been associated with serious economic and environmental consequences in both stationary and non-stationary (mobile) systems, including shipping, aquaculture (e.g., cages), and other onshore and offshore activities (e.g., oil sea platforms, wind turbine sea platforms, desalination and wastewater treatment units, pipelines, water valves, filters, and sensors). Bio-attachments can promote premature substrate corrosion, promoted by microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), system clogging, drag friction, and fluids contamination, with costly maintenance and retrofitting being necessary as a result.

Throughout the history of protective coatings, several antifouling strategies have been utilized. The most revolutionary generation of coatings was marked by the appearance of tributyltin (TBT)-release-based antifouling coatings in the marine industry in the 1960s. These were useful due to their high efficacy and broad-spectrum toxic action, providing huge operational savings. However, this approach was shortly abandoned due to its harmful effects on the marine ecosystem, and was banned in 2008. Since then, efforts have been made to replace this toxic agent and/or its derivatives. Most conventional antifouling strategies (e.g., soluble polymeric matrices, controlled depletion polymer coatings (CDPs), and self-polishing tin-free copolymer coatings (TF-SPC)) act through controlled-release mechanisms of toxic agents or booster biocides. While these are considered to be less toxic to the aquatic environment, global environmental concern has led to severe restrictions on their use. Alternative strategies, mostly inspired by the observation of natural chemical–physical antifouling defense mechanisms, have been emerging, including foul-release systems, bio-passive polymeric coatings, and microtopography-modified polymers. However, these strategies have not yet accomplished significant advantaged compared with the TBT generation of coatings, or they are costly.  

Research is required to provide new strategies for more efficient, sustainable, environmentally friendly coating solutions, as well as to overcome major challenges, such as the complexity of the biofouling process and its relationships with global warming. Ineffective solutions have the potential to inflict serious harm to the marine ecosystem.

This Special Issue of Coatings, “Environmentally Friendly Marine Coatings for biofouling control and Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion Inhibition”, will cover the most recent and promising advances in research surrounding marine coatings for the control of biofouling and for inhibiting microbiologically influenced corrosion.

The main topics that this Special Issue of Coatings will cover include the following:

  • Foul-releasing coatings;
  • Antifouling self-healing coatings;
  • Non-releasing biocidal coatings;
  • Bio-passive-based polymeric coatings (zwitterionic, self-assembled monolayer approaches);
  • Bioinspired coatings (incorporating natural and/or new synthesized biomimetic based agents, micro-topographically modified coatings);
  • Hybrid and/or multifunctional coatings (amphiphilic/stimuli-responsive systems);
  • Sewer concrete coatings.

Dr. Elisabete Ribeiro Silva
Dr. Guangming Jiang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antifouling coatings
  • polymer coatings
  • marine coatings
  • bioinspired coatings
  • hybrid/multifunctional coatings

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1484 KiB  
Article
Eco-Friendly Capsaicin-Containing Water-Based Antifouling Coatings for Marine Aquaculture
by Zeynep Beyazkilic, Mirko Faccini, Ana Maria Escobar and Lorenzo Bautista
Coatings 2023, 13(9), 1616; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13091616 - 15 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1320
Abstract
Natural antifoulants have received significant interest in the search for non- or less-toxic antifouling coating systems for marine structures. Capsaicin, a natural compound that can be found in chili peppers, is known as an environmentally friendly antifouling agent with an excellent performance and [...] Read more.
Natural antifoulants have received significant interest in the search for non- or less-toxic antifouling coating systems for marine structures. Capsaicin, a natural compound that can be found in chili peppers, is known as an environmentally friendly antifouling agent with an excellent performance and a low environmental impact. However, controlling its release from the coating matrix is still an issue to be solved. With the aim of developing an eco-friendly antifouling system with prolonged long-term activity, in this study, we incorporated capsaicin in combination with dichlofluanid into water-based acrylic coating formulations. The antifouling activity of the resulting coatings was studied by examining the survival behavior of a Gram-negative marine bacterium Aeromonas Salmonoid ATCC 33658, and the release rate of capsaicin from the paint matrix was also assessed. The combination of 0.75 wt.% capsaicin and 0.75 wt.% dichlofluanid into the same matrix showed an antibacterial performance of up to 99.9% cfu reduction with an antibacterial value R 2.5–3 times higher than those obtained with the single biocides at 1.5 wt.%. The association between the two organic biocides created a synergistic effect on the antifouling performance, further resulting in a prolonged activity. Full article
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13 pages, 1599 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Concrete and Mortar Properties and Durability Using Pristine Graphene Particles
by Kirthi Chetty, Michael Watson, Thomas Raine, Todd McGurgan, Paul Ladislaus, Jun Chen, Shuai Zhang, Liangxu Lin and Guangming Jiang
Coatings 2022, 12(11), 1703; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12111703 - 8 Nov 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2251
Abstract
The usage of industrially generated graphene was explored in this work, with an emphasis on dosage effects on durability, as well as the mechanical and microstructural properties of both concrete and mortar (0%, 0.1%, and 0.2% in concrete and 0%, 0.07%, and 0.15% [...] Read more.
The usage of industrially generated graphene was explored in this work, with an emphasis on dosage effects on durability, as well as the mechanical and microstructural properties of both concrete and mortar (0%, 0.1%, and 0.2% in concrete and 0%, 0.07%, and 0.15% in mortar). Based on the mix design for wastewater infrastructure, the results showed that adding graphene to both concrete and mortar enhanced 28-day compressive strength by 10%–20%, with the best admixture level being 0.02%–0.1%. Graphene reduced the AVPV of mortar by 11.7%, and concrete by 19.3% at the optimal dosages, likely by reducing the number or size of pores in the paste. The 0.2% and 0.15% graphene reinforced concrete and mortar showed significant sulfate resistance, by reducing 62% and 60% of extension respectively, after exposure to a sulfate solution for 16 weeks. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 6668 KiB  
Review
Biobased Anti-Adhesive Marine Coatings from Polyhydroxyalkanoates and Polysaccharides
by Fabienne Faÿ, Marie Champion, Alexandra Guennec, Xavier Moppert, Christelle Simon-Colin and Mathieu Elie
Coatings 2023, 13(4), 766; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13040766 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2341
Abstract
Due to environmental regulations, antifouling marine coatings must be gradually replaced by biocide-free coatings. Marine organisms weakly adhere to fouling release coatings, presenting a low surface free energy and a high elasticity, so they can be readily removed by the sheer force of [...] Read more.
Due to environmental regulations, antifouling marine coatings must be gradually replaced by biocide-free coatings. Marine organisms weakly adhere to fouling release coatings, presenting a low surface free energy and a high elasticity, so they can be readily removed by the sheer force of water. Currently, these materials are mainly composed of petrochemical polymers, such as silicone or fluoropolymers, with hydrophilic polymers as additives. However, following the ever-increasing environmental concerns, the research on new, alternative, eco-friendly coatings is oriented towards the use of biobased polymers from renewable resources. Two main families have been studied: polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and polysaccharides. PHAs are produced by bacteria in stressful conditions, while polysaccharides are extracted from plants, animals, or micro-organisms such as bacteria, in which case they are called exopolysaccharides (EPS). Since the use of these polymers is a non-toxic approach to controlling fouling colonization, this review provides an overview of these biobased polymers for their applications in new anti-adhesive marine coatings. Full article
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