Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Ceramic Coatings and Engineering Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2023) | Viewed by 16475

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
UniSA STEM, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia
Interests: surface engineering; advanced manufacturing; modelling; biomanufacturing; surface integrity; corrosion; biomaterials
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, Huanghe Science and Technology University, Zhengzhou 450003, China
Interests: micro/nano surface machining on semiconductor and ceramic materials; wear investigations on polished surfaces; mechanical property post-testing on ceramic substrates; AI aided parameter optimization in precision manufacturing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, China
Interests: abrasive water/air jet machining of multi-scale structures on engineering materials; novel abrasive flow machining technologies with assistance of hybrid multi-energy fields; exploring materials response to the abrasive flow machining process for the underlying science, such as tribology, fractures, mechanics, etc., using FEM and DEM; numerical modelling of abrasive flow machining process by using CFD-DEM coupling method; materials removal mechanisms, surface formation mechanisms and surface integrity related to the advanced machining technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, structural materials have been widely used in modern industries, such as building sites, surface engineering, and bio-materials applications. Therefore, high-precision materials handling becomes prominent in crucial engineering facets, e.g., the prolonged wear life of mining tools, damage free silicon wafers, and artificial implants. Then, to obtain a deep and comprehensive insight into such mechanisms and material behaviours, property investigations and applications are of key challenge to improve industrial facilitations.

Material processing problems are encountered in a myriad of experimental analyses and testing situations. For instance, the statistical analyses of mining chips and cutting forces provide an efficient prediction for specific energy and wear conditions of mining picks, setting up a quantitative understanding of such rock mechanisms. In polishing the silicon wafer, damage free surfaces and high polishing efficiency are necessary for the post-processing stage. Deep analyses of the mechanism, with all the vital parameters involved in the polishing process, would be a practical identification guidance, helping engineers optimize the machining process. Especially, for polysaccharide-rich plant biomass, large-scale data analysis and ‘omics’-based strategies could be used for the enzyme prediction to improve the feedstock productivity for biofuel, chemicals, and biomaterials in bioenergy crops. Hence, property investigations could be exploited to explore the nature of such material mechanisms. Mathematical methods can be exploited, such as gradient-based optimization, machine learning, deep learning, multiscale analysis, image processing, etc., can also be applied in such material research.

The Special Issue focuses on a collection of original and review articles relating to recent materials research, and handles processing problems in ceramics, rock, and biomaterials fields. Ingenious and initiative applications of such problems in industries are also welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Technical analysis in rock engineering;
  • Mechanism analyses of brittle fracture for ceramics;
  • Parameter prediction and optimization of materials handling with machine learning;
  • Surface modifications of advanced materials and their optimization;
  • Post-processing and characterization of additively manufactured metal parts;
  • Abrasive water/air jet machining of multi-scale structures on engineering materials;
  • Bio-manufacturing;
  • Novel abrasive flow machining technologies with hybrid multi-energy fields;
  • Exploring materials response to the abrasive flow machining process;
  • Numerical modelling of abrasive flow machining process by using CFD-DEM coupling method;
  • Materials removal mechanisms, surface formation mechanisms and surface integrity related to the advanced machining technology;

Dr. Mohammad Uddin
Prof. Dr. Qingyu Yao
Dr. Huan Qi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • materials handling
  • surface engineering
  • bio engineering
  • machining
  • applications

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 202 KiB  
Editorial
Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing
by Qingyu Yao
Coatings 2023, 13(3), 631; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13030631 - 17 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1271
Abstract
Advanced structural materials have been widely used in modern industries, such as mining, building, aerospace, chip manufacturing and surface engineering [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)

Research

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17 pages, 10017 KiB  
Article
The Polishing of Inner Wall on Medical Device Hole by Shear Thickening Abrasive Flow
by Biqing Ye, Wenbin Mao, Renquan Ji, Xi Zeng and Li Zhang
Coatings 2023, 13(9), 1492; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13091492 - 24 Aug 2023
Viewed by 929
Abstract
To improve medical device hole inner wall quality and overcome issues of traditional abrasive flow methods—limited fluidity in small holes causing deformation due to high inner wall pressure, and slow processing with low viscosity abrasives—a new method called shear thickening abrasive flow polishing [...] Read more.
To improve medical device hole inner wall quality and overcome issues of traditional abrasive flow methods—limited fluidity in small holes causing deformation due to high inner wall pressure, and slow processing with low viscosity abrasives—a new method called shear thickening abrasive flow polishing is suggested. It uses shear thickening fluid as the medium. By leveraging the Preston equation and fluid dynamics theory, this study establishes both an abrasive flow dynamics model and a material removal model for the shear thickening abrasive flow machining of small titanium alloy hole workpieces in medical instruments. Utilizing the COMSOL software, the flow field state of shear thickening fluid within small holes is examined under varying flow behavior indexes and flow velocities. The findings demonstrate that shear thickening fluid yields superior polishing effects compared to Newtonian fluid. Elevating the flow behavior indexes facilitates a higher material removal rate on the inner wall surface; however, excessively large flow behavior indexes diminish the uniformity of material removal, thereby hindering the attainment of a high-quality polished surface. Furthermore, excessively large flow behavior indexes can reduce fluidity and consequently lower the efficiency of the polishing process. Conversely, while maintaining a constant flow behavior index, increasing the flow velocity contributes to an enhanced material removal rate and improved polishing efficiency. Nevertheless, as the flow velocity rises, the uniformity of inner wall surface roughness diminishes, posing challenges in achieving a high-quality polished surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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18 pages, 9940 KiB  
Article
Ceramic–Titanium Alloy Artificial Hip Joint Wear Simulation and Experimental Study
by Renquan Ji, Fei Chen, Rongmin Ying and Li Zhang
Coatings 2023, 13(8), 1321; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13081321 - 27 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1017
Abstract
The wear of artificial joints can lead to joint noise and tissue pathology within the human body, which is a primary factor affecting their service life. In response to the issue of wear in ceramic–titanium alloy artificial hip joints, this study employed hip [...] Read more.
The wear of artificial joints can lead to joint noise and tissue pathology within the human body, which is a primary factor affecting their service life. In response to the issue of wear in ceramic–titanium alloy artificial hip joints, this study employed hip joint wear simulations and experimental wear testing on hip joint specimens to investigate the impact of different contact surface parameters on the wear of ceramic–titanium alloy articulating surfaces. The objective was to provide guidance for joint surface treatment to minimize wear. The simulation results demonstrated that the contacting surfaces of the articulating components exhibited a crescent-shaped surface composition before and after wear. The initial variation in the surface friction coefficient had minimal influence on the wear rate after stabilization, whereas excessively high friction coefficients led to erratic changes in wear depth. Based on the simulation results, experimental research was conducted to compare the wear results of different surface roughness values ranging from 60 to 550 nm. The findings revealed that a surface roughness of 150 nm exhibited the least amount of wear and the best anti-wear performance. Furthermore, an exploration of the mechanism behind the influence of different surface friction coefficients on the wear of the articulating surfaces provided valuable insights for surface processing and wear analysis of artificial joints. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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11 pages, 2170 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation on the Effect of Cutting-Edge Shape Factor on the Cutting Performance of Titanium Alloy
by Zhangping You, Haiyang Yuan and Xiaoping Ye
Coatings 2023, 13(6), 1048; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13061048 - 6 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1247
Abstract
Titanium alloys are extensively utilized in the aerospace industry due to their exceptional properties, encompassing high specific strength and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, these alloys present inherent challenges as difficult-to-machine materials characterized by low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity. The machining of titanium [...] Read more.
Titanium alloys are extensively utilized in the aerospace industry due to their exceptional properties, encompassing high specific strength and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, these alloys present inherent challenges as difficult-to-machine materials characterized by low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity. The machining of titanium alloys often gives rise to elevated cutting forces and temperatures, thereby resulting in compromised machining quality and substantial tool wear. This study explores the influence of the cutting-edge shape factor on tool performance and optimizes the cutting-edge structure through finite element simulation. Remarkably, the cutting performance of the tool demonstrates significant enhancement following cutting-edge passivation. Alterations in the geometric shape of the cutting-edge after passivation exert a notable impact on the tool’s cutting performance, with a superior performance observed for shape factor K > 1 compared to alternative edge structures. Additionally, numerical simulation is employed to analyze the influence of passivation values and on cutting force and temperature, which are crucial factors affecting cutting performance. The results underscore the significant impact of on cutting force and temperature. Furthermore, within the confines of maintaining an identical shape factor K, the blade segment group featuring = 40 μm and = 25 μm exhibits the lowest maximum cutting temperature, thereby indicating the optimal tool design attainable through this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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18 pages, 16571 KiB  
Article
Research on Insulator Defect Detection Based on Improved YOLOv7 and Multi-UAV Cooperative System
by Rong Chang, Shuai Zhou, Yi Zhang, Nanchuan Zhang, Chengjiang Zhou and Mengzhen Li
Coatings 2023, 13(5), 880; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13050880 - 7 May 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2153
Abstract
Insulator self-blasts, cracked insulators, and bird nests often lead to large-scale power outages and safety accidents, while the detection system based on a single UAV and YOLOv7 is difficult to meet the speed and accuracy requirements in actual detection. Therefore, a novel insulator [...] Read more.
Insulator self-blasts, cracked insulators, and bird nests often lead to large-scale power outages and safety accidents, while the detection system based on a single UAV and YOLOv7 is difficult to meet the speed and accuracy requirements in actual detection. Therefore, a novel insulator defect detection method based on improved YOLOv7 and a multi-UAV collaborative system is proposed innovatively. Firstly, a complete insulator defects dataset is constructed, and the introduction of insulator self-blasts, cracked insulators, and bird nest images avoids the problem of low reliability for single defect detection. Secondly, a multi-UAV collaborative platform is proposed, which improves the search scope and efficiency. Most critically, an improved YOLOv7-C3C2-GAM is proposed. The introduction of the C3C2 module and the CNeB2 structure improves the efficiency and accuracy of feature extraction, and the introduction of a global attention mechanism (GAM) improved the feature extraction ability to extract key information about small targets or occluded targets and feature in the region of interest. Compared with YOLOv7, the accuracies of YOLOv7-C3C2 and YOLOv7-C3C2-GAM are improved by 1.3% and 0.5%, respectively, the speed of YOLOv7-C3C2 is improved by 0.1 ms, and the lightweight sizes are reduced by 8.2 Mb and 8.1 Mb, respectively. Therefore, the proposed method provides theoretical and technical support for power equipment defect detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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19 pages, 7434 KiB  
Article
Experimental and Numerical Study on Regulation of Cutting Temperature during the Circular Sawing of 45 Steel
by Yangyu Wang, Zheng Wang, Pengcheng Ni, Dejie Wang, Yanhui Lu, Hui Lu, Shenghao Guo and Zhenzhen Chen
Coatings 2023, 13(4), 758; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13040758 - 10 Apr 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1830
Abstract
Studying the cutting temperature is critical for unlocking the secrets of sawblade wear, lifespan, and the metallurgical alterations beneath the surface. This paper describes an investigation into the temperature of 45 steel during dry sawing, using a cemented carbide circular saw blade under [...] Read more.
Studying the cutting temperature is critical for unlocking the secrets of sawblade wear, lifespan, and the metallurgical alterations beneath the surface. This paper describes an investigation into the temperature of 45 steel during dry sawing, using a cemented carbide circular saw blade under various cutting conditions. A temperature acquisition system was developed, enabling the determination of the average temperature of the arc zone in the workpiece and the temperature of the sawtooth tip via a semi-automated thermocouple measurement and an embedded dynamic artificial thermocouple method, respectively. Results obtained from these two methods indicate a positive correlation between the sawing temperature and the saw blade speed and feed rate, with an optimal combination of cutting process parameters identified for maintaining stability within reasonable ranges. Finite element simulations reveal a cyclical fluctuation in temperature along the workpiece surface and sawtooth, with a gradual decrease after an increase in the intermittent step, and confirm the relationship between the sawing temperature and the saw blade and feed rates observed experimentally. Overall, this study presents valuable insights into the temperature changes occurring during the sawing process, with important implications for improving productivity and maintaining stability in industrial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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13 pages, 3698 KiB  
Article
Model Development of Stress Intensity Factor on 7057T6 Aluminum Alloy Using Extended Finite Element Method
by Haiyang Yuan, Weibo Yang, Li Zhang and Tao Hong
Coatings 2023, 13(3), 581; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13030581 - 7 Mar 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1663
Abstract
The stress intensity factor represents a vital parameter within the realm of linear elastic fracture mechanics. It acts as the cornerstone in determining crack propagation and evaluating damage tolerance. However, calculating this factor is a complex task. To surmount this challenge, models of [...] Read more.
The stress intensity factor represents a vital parameter within the realm of linear elastic fracture mechanics. It acts as the cornerstone in determining crack propagation and evaluating damage tolerance. However, calculating this factor is a complex task. To surmount this challenge, models of the stress intensity factor for both edge and center cracks were developed using the extended finite element method. The result of this effort is the ability to calculate the stress intensity factor at the crack tip under different loads and normalized crack lengths. The accuracy of these calculations was confirmed by comparing them to results from the NASGRO method, and the optimal mesh sizes for both the crack elements and overall units were established. Further analysis, conducted through MATLAB’s regression analysis, led to the development of an empirical model. This model was found to be both simple and reliable, making it an ideal tool for engineering applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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Graphical abstract

15 pages, 3743 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on Preparation of Dry-Mixed Mortar from Coal Gangue
by Yue Cheng, Haijie Zhu, Shengjun Zhang, Huiyong Wu, Junjun Cong and Yuqing Luo
Coatings 2023, 13(3), 518; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13030518 - 25 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1657
Abstract
In this experiment, the influence of coal gangue as the admixture on the performance of dry-mixed mortar was studied, and the results were analyzed by XRD and SEM. The effects of different ways of crushing, particle size distribution, coal gangue, cement, admixture, and [...] Read more.
In this experiment, the influence of coal gangue as the admixture on the performance of dry-mixed mortar was studied, and the results were analyzed by XRD and SEM. The effects of different ways of crushing, particle size distribution, coal gangue, cement, admixture, and water content on the water retention, consistency, and 7 d compressive strength of dry-mixed mortar were investigated. The results show that the optimum content of hammer crushing of coal gangue through 3 mm sieve and cement is 83% and 17% of the total mass (W/W), respectively, the admixture content of 1# compound is 0.2 g/kg, and the amount of water is in the range of 194~200 mL/kg. At this time, the consistency can reach 91.5 mm, the water retention rate can reach 92.11%, and the 7 d compressive strength can reach 10.6 MPa, which meets the requirements of dry-mixed mortar for ordinary plastering and masonry mortar (GB-T 25181-2019). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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17 pages, 12674 KiB  
Article
Peak Cutting Force Estimation of Improved Projection Profile Method for Rock Fracturing Capacity Prediction with High Lithological Tolerance
by Mingyu Duan, Lefei Shao, Qibai Huang, Chenlin Wang, Xuefeng Li and Yizhe Huang
Coatings 2022, 12(9), 1306; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12091306 - 6 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1235
Abstract
Prediction of rock fracturing capacity demands particular requirements for the exploitation of mineral resources, especially for the parameter design of conical pick performance for hard rock fragmentation, which must take into account differences in rock mechanical properties. Among these parameters, the peak cutting [...] Read more.
Prediction of rock fracturing capacity demands particular requirements for the exploitation of mineral resources, especially for the parameter design of conical pick performance for hard rock fragmentation, which must take into account differences in rock mechanical properties. Among these parameters, the peak cutting force (PCF) is important in designing, selecting, and optimizing the cutting head of mining equipment and a cutability index of rocks. Taking high lithological tolerance as demand traction, this study proposes a theoretical model for estimating the peak cutting force of conical picks based on the improved projection profile method for which the influence of alloy head, pick body structure, and installation parameters are taken into consideration. Besides, experimental results corresponding to different numbers of rock samples are used to verify the accuracy and stability of the theoretical model. Meanwhile, the comparison of performance in cutting force estimation between this model and four other existing theoretical models is conducted. The results found that the new method has the highest correlation coefficient with the experimental results and the lowest root mean square error comparing with other models, i.e., the estimation performance of this method has high lithological tolerance when the rock type increases and the lithology changes. Consequently, the proposed peak cutting force estimation of improved projection profile method will provide a more valid and accurate prediction for rock fracturing capacity with large differences in rock mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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Review

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16 pages, 3563 KiB  
Review
State of the Art and Perspectives on Surface-Strengthening Process and Associated Mechanisms by Shot Peening
by Xiaodong Xie, Li Zhang, Liangliang Zhu, Yanbiao Li, Tao Hong, Weibo Yang and Xiaohang Shan
Coatings 2023, 13(5), 859; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13050859 - 30 Apr 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2735
Abstract
Shot peening is a surface-strengthening process that is widely used in various industries, such as aerospace, automotive, and biomedical engineering. The process involves the impact of small, spherical media, called shots, onto the surface of a material, resulting in residual compressive stress and [...] Read more.
Shot peening is a surface-strengthening process that is widely used in various industries, such as aerospace, automotive, and biomedical engineering. The process involves the impact of small, spherical media, called shots, onto the surface of a material, resulting in residual compressive stress and improved surface properties. This review aims to provide an overview of the state of the art and perspectives on surface strengthening by shot peening. The review covers various aspects of shot peening, including process parameters, shot materials, and quality control techniques. The advantages and limitations of shot peening in comparison to other surface-strengthening techniques are also discussed. The findings of this review indicate that shot peening is a versatile and effective surface-strengthening technique with numerous applications, and further research is needed to fully realize its potential. In conclusion, this review provides insights into the current status and future perspectives on surface strengthening by shot peening, and it is expected to be useful for researchers, engineers, and practitioners in the field of material science and engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigations and Applications in Advanced Materials Processing)
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