Special Issue "Chemical and Biosensors: A Theme Issue in Honor of Professor Otto S. Wolfbeis"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Xudong Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Chemistry bld. A4013, Songhu Road No. 2205, Yangpu District, 200438 Shanghai, China
Interests: optical sensors; luminescence sensing and imaging
Prof. Dr. Hongshang Peng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Optoelectronics Research Center, College of Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing 100081, China
Interests: luminescent oxygen sensor; photodynamic thereapy; quantum dots

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Otto S. Wolfbeis was a full professor of Analytical and Interface Chemistry at the University of Regensburg, Germany, from 1995 to 2012, and is well known as a pioneer in the field of luminescence chemo- and biosensors. He has authored numerous papers and reviews on optical (fiber) chemical sensors, fluorescent probes, labels, and bioassays; on advanced polymers for use in sensing schemes; on photonic crystals and upconversion particles; and on spectroscopic methods, including fluorescence (lifetime) and RGB-based digital imaging. Another field relates to bioimaging using advanced nanomaterials. Prof. Wolfbeis has also worked on various types of electrochemical sensors, typically on sensors for gases, neurological drugs and saliva biomarkers, in the aptamer-based electrochemical sensing of thrombin, and in enantioselective sensing. His group described the first capacitive immunosensor back in 1997, and several electrodes coated with molecularly imprinted polymers have been designed for use in impedimetric sensing. Finally, various kinds of analyte response materials were described for use in surface plasmon resonance sensing. His work is listed in https://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&user=pJlFf1IAAAAJ. Many of his sensors are now industrially manufactured. He has (co)edited several books and acted as the (co)organizer of several conferences related to fluorescence spectroscopy (MAF) . He is also the founder of the Europt(r)ode Conference Series, the most comprehensive international conference in the field of optical chemical sensors and biosensors. He was one of the 10 curators of Angewandte Chemie (VCH-Wiley, Weinheim), the editor-in-chief of Microchimica Acta (Springer-Nature, Vienna), and one of the three founding editors of Methods and Application in Fluorescence (Inst. Physics Publ., London).

This Special Issue is dedicated to celebrating the career of Professor Otto S. Wolfbeis in honor of his contributions in the field of chemical and biosensors. It will cover a selection of recent research and review articles on subjects ranging from new chemical sensors and biosensors, new probes and labels, novel quantifying methods, and their applications.

Chemical and biosensors are miniaturized analytical devices that can deliver real-time and online information on the presence of specific compounds, (bio)molecules, or ions in complex samples. They are playing increasingly important roles in both fundamental research and environmental and industrial sectors and have found enormous applications in biological research, health care, biomedical monitoring and imaging, environmental monitoring, and automation control. This Special Issue aims to provide an overview and show original innovations in current development and state-of-the-art techniques in chemical and biosensors in the journal Chemosensors. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Reviews on chemical sensors and biosensors;
  • Innovations on chemical sensors and biosensors;
  • Optical sensors and biosensors;
  • Electrochemical sensors and biosensors;
  • Electrogenerated chemiluminescence sensors and biosensors;
  • New sensor film or nanosensors;
  • Novel sensor schemes and new quantifying methods;
  • Applications of chemo- and biosensors;
  • Advanced nanomaterials for use in sensing and bioimaging.

Prof. Dr. Xudong Wang
Prof. Dr. Hongshang Peng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chemical sensors
  • biosensors
  • probes
  • labels
  • spectroscope
  • nanoparticles

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Glucose Biosensor Based on Dendritic Gold Nanostructures Electrodeposited on Graphite Electrode by Different Electrochemical Methods
Chemosensors 2021, 9(8), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9080188 - 22 Jul 2021
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Abstract
In this research, we have demonstrated a one-step electrochemical deposition of dendritic gold nanostructures (DGNs) on a graphite rod (GR) electrode without any template, seeds, surfactants, or stabilizers. Three electrochemical methods, namely, constant potential amperometry (CPA), pulse amperometry, and differential pulse voltammetry, were [...] Read more.
In this research, we have demonstrated a one-step electrochemical deposition of dendritic gold nanostructures (DGNs) on a graphite rod (GR) electrode without any template, seeds, surfactants, or stabilizers. Three electrochemical methods, namely, constant potential amperometry (CPA), pulse amperometry, and differential pulse voltammetry, were used for DGN synthesis on GR electrode and further application in enzymatic glucose biosensors. Formed gold nanostructures, including DGNs, were characterized by a field emission scanning electron microscopy. The optimal concentration of HAuCl4 (6.0 mmol L−1), duration of DGNs synthesis (400 s), electrodeposition potential (−0.4 V), and the best electrochemical method (CPA) were determined experimentally. Then the enzyme, glucose oxidase, was adsorbed on the surface of DGNs and covalently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde vapor. The enzymatic glucose biosensor based on DGNs electrodeposited at optimal conditions and modified with glucose oxidase showed a quick response (less than 3 s), a high saturation current (291 μA), appropriate linear range (up to 9.97 mmol L−1 of glucose, R2 = 0.9994), good repeatability (RSD 2.4, 2.2 and 1.5% for 2, 30, 97 mmol L−1 of glucose), low limit of detection (0.059 mmol L−1, S/N = 3) and good stability. Additionally, this biosensor could be successfully applied for glucose determination in real samples with good accuracy. These results proved the principle of enzymatic glucose biosensor development based on DGNs as the basis for further investigations. Full article
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Article
Nanoparticle Determination in Water by LED-Excited Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging
Chemosensors 2021, 9(7), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9070175 - 11 Jul 2021
Viewed by 342
Abstract
The increasing popularity of nanoparticles in many applications has led to the fact that these persistent materials pollute our environment and threaten our health. An online sensor system for monitoring the presence of nanoparticles in fresh water would be highly desired. We propose [...] Read more.
The increasing popularity of nanoparticles in many applications has led to the fact that these persistent materials pollute our environment and threaten our health. An online sensor system for monitoring the presence of nanoparticles in fresh water would be highly desired. We propose a label-free sensor based on SPR imaging. The sensitivity was enhanced by a factor of about 100 by improving the detector by using a high-resolution camera. This revealed that the light source also needed to be improved by using LED excitation instead of a laser light source. As a receptor, different self-assembled monolayers have been screened. It can be seen that the nanoparticle receptor interaction is of a complex nature. The best system when taking sensitivity as well as reversibility into account is given by a dodecanethiol monolayer on the gold sensor surface. Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles, 29 nm in diameter and with a similar refractive index to the most common silica nanoparticles were detected in water down to 1.5 µg mL−1. The sensor can be fully regenerated within one hour without the need for any washing buffer. This sensing concept is expected to be easily adapted for the detection of nanoparticles of different size, shape, and composition, and upon miniaturization, suitable for long-term applications to monitor the quality of water. Full article
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Article
Novel Colour-Based, Prototype Indicator for Use in High-Pressure Processing (HPP)
Chemosensors 2021, 9(7), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9070164 - 01 Jul 2021
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Abstract
The preparation and testing of a colour-based prototype indicator for high-pressure processing (HPP) are described. The indicator is a layered structure comprising a pressed disc of a mixture of silica gel, which has been previously loaded with a set wt% of acidified water, [...] Read more.
The preparation and testing of a colour-based prototype indicator for high-pressure processing (HPP) are described. The indicator is a layered structure comprising a pressed disc of a mixture of silica gel, which has been previously loaded with a set wt% of acidified water, and polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, powders, a water-permeable barrier layer, and a Congo-Red-based pH indicator layer, all vacuum-sealed in a water impermeable plastic film. The value of the wt% is calculated from the ratio of the mass of acidified water added to the mass of originally dry silica gel. The high pressures associated with HPP drive the release of the acidified water from the silica gel and its subsequent transport through the water-permeable barrier layer to the pH indicator, thereby producing a striking red-to-blue colour change. The response of the HPP indicator can be tuned to different HPP conditions by varying the wt% of acidified water used to load the silica gel powder. Indicators, with 61, 63, and 65 wt% acidified water loaded silica gel, are prepared and found to require, respectively, the application of at least, 600, 400, and 300 MPa pressure for 3 min to effect a change colour. To our knowledge, this is the first reported example of a prototype HPP indicator that can be tuned to respond to the very different pressure and time conditions used in HPP to sterilise such very different products as milk, apple and orange juice, and aloe vera gel. Full article
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Review

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Review
Advances in Wearable Chemosensors
Chemosensors 2021, 9(5), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9050099 - 29 Apr 2021
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Abstract
In this review, the latest research on wearable chemosensors is presented. In focus are the results from open literature, mainly from the last three years. The progress in wearable chemosensors is presented with attention drawn to the measuring technologies, their ability to provide [...] Read more.
In this review, the latest research on wearable chemosensors is presented. In focus are the results from open literature, mainly from the last three years. The progress in wearable chemosensors is presented with attention drawn to the measuring technologies, their ability to provide robust data, the manufacturing techniques, as well their autonomy and ability to produce power. However, from statistical studies, the issue of patients’ trust in these technologies has arisen. People do not trust their personal data be transferred, stored, and processed through the vastness of the internet, which allows for timely diagnosis and treatment. The issue of power consumption and autonomy of chemosensor-integrated devices is also studied and the most recent solutions to this problem thoroughly presented. Full article
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Review
Application of PEDOT:PSS and Its Composites in Electrochemical and Electronic Chemosensors
Chemosensors 2021, 9(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9040079 - 13 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) is a highly important and attractive conducting polymer as well as commercially available in organic electronics, including electrochemical and electronic chemosensors, due to its unique features such as excellent solution-fabrication capability and miscibility, high and controllable conductivity, excellent chemical and [...] Read more.
Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) is a highly important and attractive conducting polymer as well as commercially available in organic electronics, including electrochemical and electronic chemosensors, due to its unique features such as excellent solution-fabrication capability and miscibility, high and controllable conductivity, excellent chemical and electrochemical stability, good optical transparency and biocompatibility. In this review, we present a comprehensive overview of the recent research progress of PEDOT:PSS and its composites, and the application in electrochemical and electronic sensors for detecting liquid-phase or gaseous chemical analytes, including inorganic or organic ions, pH, humidity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ammonia (NH3), CO, CO2, NO2, and organic solvent vapors like methanol, acetone, etc. We will discuss in detail the structural, architectural and morphological optimization of PEDOT:PSS and its composites with other additives, as well as the fabrication technology of diverse sensor systems in response to a wide range of analytes in varying environments. At the end of the review will be given a perspective summary covering both the key challenges and potential solutions in the future research of PEDOT:PSS-based chemosensors, especially those in a flexible or wearable format. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Recent Progresses in Lanthanide-Based NIR-II Nanocrystals as Chemo/Bio-sensors
Authors: Tingyu Yang; Jinglei Qin; Lanying Guo; Mu Yang; Xi Wu; Hongshang Peng
Affiliation: 1 College of Life and Environmental Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing, 100081, China 2 College of Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing, 100081, China 3 Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing, 100044, China
Abstract: Lanthanide-based luminescent nanocrystals with the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) emission (900-1700 nm) have attracted intensive attention as chemo/bio-sensors by virtue of the merits of excellent chemical and optical stability, narrow emission bands, long lifetime, negligible auto fluorescence and long penetration depth. In this paper, the latest research progresses on NIR-II luminescent sensors based on lanthanide nanocrystals have been retrospected. Firstly, the design and synthesis of NIR-II lanthanide-based nanocrystals are discussed from spectral point of view. Secondly, surface modification and sensing mechanisms are classified and commented with respect to various applications in biosensing and imaging. Finally, disadvantages of NIR-II lanthanide-based chemo/bio-sensors and their prospect are given.

Title: Recent Advances in Environmental Monitoring of Antimicrobial Resistance Using Sensors and Biosensors
Authors: Eduardo C. Reynoso; Eduardo Torres; Ilaria Palchetti
Affiliation: 1 Posgrado en Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto de Ciencias, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla 72570, Mexico; [email protected] (E.C.R.); [email protected] (E.T.) 2 Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Fi), Italy
Abstract: The indiscriminate use and mismanagement of antibiotics over the last decades has led to one of the most prevalent issue in public health and economics, nowadays and for the next twenty years. One of the main challenges to tackle antimicrobial resistance is by clinical, environmental and livestock surveillance, using methods capable of effectively identifying antimicrobial non-susceptibility and specific genes that promote resistance. Conventional culture-based methods for antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST), are time consuming (taking over 24 hours to be accomplished). Currently, molecular diagnostics based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are the most common analytical approaches to identify and quantify antimicrobial resistance. Although PCR methods provide rapid detection, novel methods with the features to be easy to operate, robust, sensitive, less prone to environmental interferents, portable and inexpensive, are still required. This review summarizes the novelty in the field of phenotypic and genotypic determination of antimicrobial resistance by using chemo- and biosensors, providing an overview of future perspective of these devices in health-care and environmental surveillance.

Title: A Facile Strategy for The Current and Fluorescence Double-Checked Locking: Anhydride-Azide-Modified Biomimetic Nanochannels Sensor Towards H2S
Authors: I Wu; Dan Zhang; Xuanjun Zhang
Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macau SAR 999078, China
Abstract: Inspired by biological channel, the electric-signal-based artificial nanochannels system exhibited great superiority in qualitative and quantitative analysis. However, how to high-accurately achieve biochemical identification towards certain targets, just like subtle natural creatures, remains a challenge. Here, a facile strategy of cooperation signal of current and fluorescence for reliable detection is demonstrated and the experimental example in response to H2S is used to show the validity of the dual lock. By utilizing the specific reduction reaction H2S for anhydride-azide probe on the nanochannels, a synchronizing change in surface charge and fluorescence properties is established. As a result, both current conduction and fluorescence intensity showed significant signal increase. The photoelectric double-checked locking from temporal and spatial variation validly confirmed response process and protects detection accuracy. The facile tactics may provide new ideas for the development of more sophisticated current and fluorescence dual-index nanochannel systems.

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