Nanostructured Devices for Biochemical Sensing

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Analytical Methods, Instrumentation and Miniaturization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 38358

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
NanoBioSystems Group, Institute of Applied Sciences and Intelligent Systems, National Research Council, Via Pietro Castellino n.111, 80131 Napoli, Italy
Interests: optical biosensors; bio/non-bio interfaces; optical sensors; plasmonic substrates
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
NanoBioSYstems Group, Institute of Applied Sciences and Intelligent Systems (ISASI), National Research Council (CNR), Via Pietro Castellino 111, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: nanomaterials; hybrid interfaces; optical biosensors; surface chemistry; nanoparticles; wet chemistry

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
NanoBioSYstems Group, Institute of Applied Sciences and Intelligent Systems (ISASI), National Research Council (CNR), Via Pietro Castellino 111, 80131 Naples, Italy
Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, University of Naples “Federico II”, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: nanomaterials; optical biosensors; nanophotonics; plasmonics; metamaterials; nanofabrication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few decades, the great advancements in nanotechnology have paved the way for the development of innovative devices in several research fields. The superior optical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical features of nanostructured materials, arising from the confinement of bulk material to the nanoscale (1–100 nm), make them ideal transducers for biochemical sensing, with applications spanning from healthcare to environmental monitoring. The quest for novel fabrication and surface-modification strategies for nanostructured materials (i.e., carbon-based nanomaterials, porous silicon, noble-metal nanoparticles, metal-oxide nanostructures, and quantum dots) still represents a hot topic. On the one hand, fabrication is a fundamental aspect for tailoring the properties of the transducing element and achieving ultra-low limits of detection, high sensitivity, and ease of use. On the other hand, functionalization strategies are essential for providing the transducer with high selectivity and specificity for the selected target analytes.  

This Special Issue aims to collect all the recent insights into nanostructured biosensors and their applications in healthcare, food quality control, and environmental monitoring. The combination of nanotechnology, physics, and engineering with biochemistry and biotechnology opens the opportunity to design low-cost, easy-to-use, portable biochemical sensors with different transducing mechanisms. A nonexclusive list of topic areas is provided below:

  • Optical/electrochemical/electric/piezoelectric nanostructured biochemical sensors;
  • The design and fabrication of nanostructured transducers.;
  • The surface functionalization of nanostructured biochemical sensors;
  • The synthesis of nanoparticles for biochemical sensing;
  • Hybrid nanostructured platforms for biochemical sensing;
  • Nanostructured point-of-care testing (POCT) platforms;
  • Nanostructured biosensors for healthcare, food quality control, and environmental monitoring.

We invite authors to submit manuscripts for this forthcoming Special Issue on Nanostructured Devices for Biochemical Sensing. Both review articles and original research papers are welcomed.

Dr. Ilaria Rea
Dr. Luca De Stefano
Dr. Rosalba Moretta
Dr. Bruno Miranda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanotechnology
  • Nanostructured materials
  • Nanocomposites
  • Noble-metal nanoparticles
  • Porous silicon
  • Graphene oxide
  • Semiconductors
  • Hybrid materials
  • Biochemical sensing
  • Biosensors
  • Optical biosensors
  • Electrochemical biosensors
  • Piezoelectric biosensors
  • Nanoparticle-based biosensors
  • Electrical biosensors
  • Wearable biosensors
  • Healthcare
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Food analysis
  • Lab-on-chip
  • Point-of-care
  • Surface chemistry
  • Smart devices

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 3056 KiB  
Article
Detection of Acetoin and Diacetyl by a Tobacco Mosaic Virus-Assisted Field-Effect Biosensor
by Melanie Welden, Robin Severins, Arshak Poghossian, Christina Wege, Johannes Bongaerts, Petra Siegert, Michael Keusgen and Michael J. Schöning
Chemosensors 2022, 10(6), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors10060218 - 8 Jun 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2218
Abstract
Acetoin and diacetyl have a major impact on the flavor of alcoholic beverages such as wine or beer. Therefore, their measurement is important during the fermentation process. Until now, gas chromatographic techniques have typically been applied; however, these require expensive laboratory equipment and [...] Read more.
Acetoin and diacetyl have a major impact on the flavor of alcoholic beverages such as wine or beer. Therefore, their measurement is important during the fermentation process. Until now, gas chromatographic techniques have typically been applied; however, these require expensive laboratory equipment and trained staff, and do not allow for online monitoring. In this work, a capacitive electrolyte–insulator–semiconductor sensor modified with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) particles as enzyme nanocarriers for the detection of acetoin and diacetyl is presented. The enzyme acetoin reductase from Alkalihalobacillus clausii DSM 8716T is immobilized via biotin–streptavidin affinity, binding to the surface of the TMV particles. The TMV-assisted biosensor is electrochemically characterized by means of leakage–current, capacitance–voltage, and constant capacitance measurements. In this paper, the novel biosensor is studied regarding its sensitivity and long-term stability in buffer solution. Moreover, the TMV-assisted capacitive field-effect sensor is applied for the detection of diacetyl for the first time. The measurement of acetoin and diacetyl with the same sensor setup is demonstrated. Finally, the successive detection of acetoin and diacetyl in buffer and in diluted beer is studied by tuning the sensitivity of the biosensor using the pH value of the measurement solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Devices for Biochemical Sensing)
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12 pages, 2758 KiB  
Article
An Enzymatic Multiplexed Impedimetric Sensor Based on α-MnO2/GQD Nano-Composite for the Detection of Diabetes and Diabetic Foot Ulcer Using Micro-Fluidic Platform
by Ashish Mathur, Hari Chandra Nayak, Shailendra Rajput, Souradeep Roy, Shalini Nagabooshanam, Shikha Wadhwa and Ranjit Kumar
Chemosensors 2021, 9(12), 339; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9120339 - 2 Dec 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3831
Abstract
Diabetes is widely considered as a silent killer which affects the internal organs and ultimately has drastic impacts on our day-to-day activities. One of the fatal outcomes of diabetes is diabetic foot ulcer (DFU); which, when becomes chronic, may lead to amputation. The [...] Read more.
Diabetes is widely considered as a silent killer which affects the internal organs and ultimately has drastic impacts on our day-to-day activities. One of the fatal outcomes of diabetes is diabetic foot ulcer (DFU); which, when becomes chronic, may lead to amputation. The incorporation of nanotechnology in developing bio-sensors enables the detection of desired biomarkers, which in our study are glucose and L-tyrosine; which gets elevated in patients suffering from diabetes and DFUs, respectively. Herein, we report the development of an enzymatic impedimetric sensor for the multi-detection of these biomarkers using an electrochemical paper-based analytical device (µ-EPADs). The structure consists of two working electrodes and a counter electrode. One working electrode is modified with α-MnO2-GQD/tyrosinase hybrid to aid L-tyrosine detection, while the other electrode is coated with α-MnO2-GQD/glucose oxidase hybrid for glucose monitoring. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been employed for the quantification of glucose and L-tyrosine, within a concentration range of 50–800 mg/dL and 1–500 µmol/L, respectively, using a sample volume of approximately 200 µL. The impedance response exhibited a linear relationship over the analyte concentration range with detection limits of ~58 mg/dL and ~0.3 µmol/L for glucose and tyrosine respectively, with shelf life ~1 month. The sensing strategy was also translated to Arduino-based device applications by interfacing the µ-EPADs with miniaturized electronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Devices for Biochemical Sensing)
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19 pages, 3487 KiB  
Article
Metallo-Liposomes Derived from the [Ru(bpy)3]2+ Complex as Nanocarriers of Therapeutic Agents
by Maria Luisa Moyá, Francisco José Ostos, Izamar Moreno, Diandra García, Paula Moreno-Gordillo, Ivan V. Rosado, Pilar López-Cornejo, José Antonio Lebrón and Manuel López-López
Chemosensors 2021, 9(5), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9050090 - 25 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2453
Abstract
The obtaining of nanocarriers of gene material and small drugs is still an interesting research line. Side-effects produced by the toxicity of several pharmaceutics, the high concentrations needed to get therapeutic effects, or their excessive use by patients have motivated the search for [...] Read more.
The obtaining of nanocarriers of gene material and small drugs is still an interesting research line. Side-effects produced by the toxicity of several pharmaceutics, the high concentrations needed to get therapeutic effects, or their excessive use by patients have motivated the search for new nanostructures. For these reasons, cationic metallo-liposomes composed by phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesterol (CHO) and RuC1C19 (a surfactant derived from the metallic complex [Ru(bpy)3]2+) were prepared and characterized by using diverse techniques (zeta potential, dynamic light scattering and electronic transmission microscopy –TEM-). Unimodal or bimodal populations of spherical aggregates with small sizes were obtained depending on the composition of the liposomes. The presence of cholesterol favored the formation of small aggregates. ct-DNA was condensed in the presence of the liposomes investigated. In-vitro assays demonstrated the ability of these nanoaggregates to internalize into different cell lines. A positive gene transfection into human bone osteosarcoma epithelial cells (U2OS) was also observed. The RuC1C19 surfactant was used as sensor to quantify the binding of DNA to the liposomes. Doxorubicin was encapsulated into the metallo-liposomes, demonstrating their ability to be also used as nanocarriers of drugs. A relationship between then encapsulation percentage of the antibiotic and the composition of the aggregates has been established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Devices for Biochemical Sensing)
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Review

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31 pages, 8558 KiB  
Review
Plasmonic Nanosensors: Design, Fabrication, and Applications in Biomedicine
by Valeria Nocerino, Bruno Miranda, Chiara Tramontano, Giovanna Chianese, Principia Dardano, Ilaria Rea and Luca De Stefano
Chemosensors 2022, 10(5), 150; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors10050150 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 7778
Abstract
Current advances in the fabrication of smart nanomaterials and nanostructured surfaces find wide usage in the biomedical field. In this context, nanosensors based on localized surface plasmon resonance exhibit unprecedented optical features that can be exploited to reduce the costs, analytic times, and [...] Read more.
Current advances in the fabrication of smart nanomaterials and nanostructured surfaces find wide usage in the biomedical field. In this context, nanosensors based on localized surface plasmon resonance exhibit unprecedented optical features that can be exploited to reduce the costs, analytic times, and need for expensive lab equipment. Moreover, they are promising for the design of nanoplatforms with multiple functionalities (e.g., multiplexed detection) with large integration within microelectronics and microfluidics. In this review, we summarize the most recent design strategies, fabrication approaches, and bio-applications of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) arranged in colloids, nanoarrays, and nanocomposites. After a brief introduction on the physical principles behind plasmonic nanostructures both as inherent optical detection and as nanoantennas for external signal amplification, we classify the proposed examples in colloid-based devices when plasmonic NPs operate in solution, nanoarrays when they are assembled or fabricated on rigid substrates, and nanocomposites when they are assembled within flexible/polymeric substrates. We highlight the main biomedical applications of the proposed devices and offer a general overview of the main strengths and limitations of the currently available plasmonic nanodevices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Devices for Biochemical Sensing)
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26 pages, 9119 KiB  
Review
Nanodiagnosis and Nanotreatment of Cardiovascular Diseases: An Overview
by Fakhara Sabir, Mahmood Barani, Mahwash Mukhtar, Abbas Rahdar, Magali Cucchiarini, Muhammad Nadeem Zafar, Tapan Behl and Simona Bungau
Chemosensors 2021, 9(4), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9040067 - 30 Mar 2021
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 7468
Abstract
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the world’s leading cause of mortality and represent a large contributor to the costs of medical care. Although tremendous progress has been made for the diagnosis of CVDs, there is an important need for more effective early diagnosis and [...] Read more.
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the world’s leading cause of mortality and represent a large contributor to the costs of medical care. Although tremendous progress has been made for the diagnosis of CVDs, there is an important need for more effective early diagnosis and the design of novel diagnostic methods. The diagnosis of CVDs generally relies on signs and symptoms depending on molecular imaging (MI) or on CVD-associated biomarkers. For early-stage CVDs, however, the reliability, specificity, and accuracy of the analysis is still problematic. Because of their unique chemical and physical properties, nanomaterial systems have been recognized as potential candidates to enhance the functional use of diagnostic instruments. Nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, lipids, and polymeric nanoparticles represent novel sources to target CVDs. The special properties of nanomaterials including surface energy and topographies actively enhance the cellular response within CVDs. The availability of newly advanced techniques in nanomaterial science opens new avenues for the targeting of CVDs. The successful application of nanomaterials for CVDs needs a detailed understanding of both the disease and targeting moieties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Devices for Biochemical Sensing)
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31 pages, 4625 KiB  
Review
Nanomaterials for Diagnosis and Treatment of Brain Cancer: Recent Updates
by Mahwash Mukhtar, Muhammad Bilal, Abbas Rahdar, Mahmood Barani, Rabia Arshad, Tapan Behl, Ciprian Brisc, Florin Banica and Simona Bungau
Chemosensors 2020, 8(4), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors8040117 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 111 | Viewed by 13134
Abstract
Brain tumors, especially glioblastoma, remain the most aggressive form of all the cancers because of inefficient diagnosis and profiling. Nanostructures, such as metallic nanostructures, silica nano-vehicles, quantum dots, lipid nanoparticles (NPs) and polymeric NPs, with high specificity have made it possible to permeate [...] Read more.
Brain tumors, especially glioblastoma, remain the most aggressive form of all the cancers because of inefficient diagnosis and profiling. Nanostructures, such as metallic nanostructures, silica nano-vehicles, quantum dots, lipid nanoparticles (NPs) and polymeric NPs, with high specificity have made it possible to permeate the blood–brain barrier (BBB). NPs possess optical, magnetic and photodynamic properties that can be exploited by surface modification, bio composition, contrast agents’ encapsulation and coating by tumor-derived cells. Hence, nanotechnology has brought on a revolution in the field of diagnosis and imaging of brain tumors and cancers. Recently, nanomaterials with biomimetic functions have been introduced to efficiently cross the BBB to be engulfed by deep skin tumors and cancer malignancies for imaging. The review focuses on nanotechnology-based diagnostic and imaging approaches for exploration in brain tumors and cancers. Moreover, the review also summarizes a few strategies to image glioblastoma and cancers by multimodal functional nanocomposites for more precise and accurate clinical diagnosis. Their unique physicochemical attributes, including nanoscale sizes, larger surface area, explicit structural features and ability to encapsulate diverse molecules on their surface, render nanostructured materials as excellent nano-vehicles to cross the blood–brain barrier and convey drug molecules to their target region. This review sheds light on the current progress of various kinds of nanomaterials, such as liposomes, nano-micelles, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, carbon dots and NPs (gold, silver and zinc oxide NPs), for efficient drug delivery in the treatment and diagnosis of brain cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Devices for Biochemical Sensing)
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