Special Issue "Sustainable Metal Oxide Materials for Sensing Applications"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials for Chemical Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ana Rovisco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa and CEMOP/UNINOVA, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: multicomponent oxides; nanowires; nanofabrication; multifunctionality; sustainability
Prof. Dr. Elisabetta Comini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sensor Lab, Department of Information Engineering (DII), University of Brescia, Via Valotti 9, 25133 Brescia, Italy
Interests: metal oxides; nanowires; chemical sensors; gas sensors; heterostructures; functional materials; material synthesis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last several decades, nanotechnology has advanced at an impressive rate, owing to a high level of development in both materials and processing routes. This impressive progress is contributing significantly to the growth of several areas, such as (opto)electronics, chemical sensors, medicine/biology, energy, and others.

Particularly, sensors are some of the key devices in smart surfaces and Internet of things (IoT) applications. To meet these concepts, sensing applications now require flexible, transparent, nanoscale devices and materials. In this context, metal oxides are particularly interesting due to their good optical and electrical properties and their capability for transparency, large area uniformity, and good mechanical flexibility. Concerning the environmental issues the world is facing, special attention should be given to materials and methods which are low-cost and sustainable, while still enabling high integration levels.

Thus, this Special Issue welcomes the submission of papers focused on the fabrication of sustainable metal oxide materials, in the form of thin films or nanostructures, and their application for sensors.

Dr. Ana Rovisco
Prof. Dr. Elisabetta Comini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metal oxides
  • thin films
  • nanomaterials
  • pH sensors
  • optical sensors
  • gas sensors
  • biosensors
  • sustainability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Sensing Properties of NiO Loaded SnO2 Nanoparticles—Specific Selectivity to H2S
Chemosensors 2021, 9(6), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9060125 - 01 Jun 2021
Viewed by 388
Abstract
NiO-loaded SnO2 powders were prepared involving two chemical procedures. The mesoporous SnO2 support was synthesized by a hydrothermal route using Brij 35 non-ionic surfactant as a template. The nickel loadings of 1 and 10 wt.%. NiO were deposited by the wet [...] Read more.
NiO-loaded SnO2 powders were prepared involving two chemical procedures. The mesoporous SnO2 support was synthesized by a hydrothermal route using Brij 35 non-ionic surfactant as a template. The nickel loadings of 1 and 10 wt.%. NiO were deposited by the wet impregnation method. The H2S sensing properties of xNiO-(1-x)SnO2 (x = 0, 1, 10%) thick layers deposited onto commercial substrates have been investigated with respect to different potential interfering gases (NO2, CO, CO2, CH4, NH3 and SO2) over a wide range of operating temperatures and relative humidity specific for in-field conditions. Following the correlation of the sensing results with the morphological ones, 1wt.% NiO/SnO2 was selected for simultaneous electrical resistance and work function investigations. The purpose was to depict the sensing mechanism by splitting between specific changes over the electron affinity induced by the surface coverage with hydroxyl dipoles and over the band bending induced by the variable surface charge under H2S exposure. Thus, it was found that different gas-interaction partners are dependent upon the amount of H2S, mirrored through the threshold value of 5 ppm H2S, which from an applicative point of view, represents the lower limit of health effects, an eight-hour TWA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Metal Oxide Materials for Sensing Applications)
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Article
Synthesis, Characterization and Gas Sensing Study of ZnO-SnO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films
Chemosensors 2021, 9(6), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9060124 - 30 May 2021
Viewed by 553
Abstract
Thin nanocomposite films composed of ZnO and SnO2 at 0.5–5 mol.% concentrations were synthesized by a new solid-phase low-temperature pyrolysis under the developed protocols. This hetero-oxide material was thoroughly studied by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy [...] Read more.
Thin nanocomposite films composed of ZnO and SnO2 at 0.5–5 mol.% concentrations were synthesized by a new solid-phase low-temperature pyrolysis under the developed protocols. This hetero-oxide material was thoroughly studied by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) techniques to be compared with electrical and gas-sensing properties. We have found that the films have a poly-nanocrystal structure of ZnO and SnO2 crystals with characteristic grain sizes at 10–15 nm range. When comparing the chemiresistive response of the films with varied tin dioxide content, the sample of Sn:Zn optimum ratio taken as 1:99 yields 1.5-fold improvement upon to 5–50 ppm NO2 exposure at 200 °C. We argue that these remarkable changes have matured from both a reducing the intergrain potential barrier down to 0.58 eV and increasing the concentration of anionic vacancies at this rational composite. The results demonstrate that solid-phase low-temperature pyrolysis is a powerful technique for adjusting the functional gas-sensing properties of hetero-oxide film via modifying the ratio of the oxide components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Metal Oxide Materials for Sensing Applications)
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Article
Dual Transduction of H2O2 Detection Using ZnO/Laser-Induced Graphene Composites
Chemosensors 2021, 9(5), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9050102 - 05 May 2021
Viewed by 477
Abstract
Zinc oxide (ZnO)/laser-induced graphene (LIG) composites were prepared by mixing ZnO, grown by laser-assisted flow deposition, with LIG produced by laser irradiation of a polyimide, both in ambient conditions. Different ZnO:LIG ratios were used to infer the effect of this combination on the [...] Read more.
Zinc oxide (ZnO)/laser-induced graphene (LIG) composites were prepared by mixing ZnO, grown by laser-assisted flow deposition, with LIG produced by laser irradiation of a polyimide, both in ambient conditions. Different ZnO:LIG ratios were used to infer the effect of this combination on the overall composite behavior. The optical properties, assessed by photoluminescence (PL), showed an intensity increase of the excitonic-related recombination with increasing LIG amounts, along with a reduction in the visible emission band. Charge-transfer processes between the two materials are proposed to justify these variations. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy evidenced increased electron transfer kinetics and an electrochemically active area with the amount of LIG incorporated in the composites. As the composites were designed to be used as transducer platforms in biosensing devices, their ability to detect and quantify hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was assessed by both PL and CV analysis. The results demonstrated that both methods can be employed for sensing, displaying slightly distinct operation ranges that allow extending the detection range by combining both transduction approaches. Moreover, limits of detection as low as 0.11 mM were calculated in a tested concentration range from 0.8 to 32.7 mM, in line with the values required for their potential application in biosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Metal Oxide Materials for Sensing Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Prospects of Palladium (II) Oxide Nanostructure Application in Gas Sensing
Authors: Alexander Samoylov1, Goran Karapetrov2, Alexey Shaposhnik3
Affiliation: 1Department of Chemistry, Voronezh State University, Voronezh, Russian Federation 2Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA 3Department of Chemistry, Voronezh State Agricultural University, Voronezh, Russian Federation
Abstract: In this review article we present the current state of the art of palladium (II) oxide nanostructure application in gas sensing. In this area the initial investigations showed that bulk doping and surface modification of traditional n-type conductivity metal oxides (SnO2, ZnO, In2O3, WO3, and TiO2) using palladium (II) oxide nanostructures could effectively increase their sensitivity and selectivity towards the reducing gases. During the last five years it has been obtained the strong evidence that functional properties of sensors based on p-type conductivity palladium (II) oxide nanostructures could be utilized at detection of both the reducing and oxidizing gases. It has been proposed that the variation of palladium (II) oxide nanostructure composition within the non-stoichiometric region and its doping with aliovalent cations can effectively be used to optimize the functional properties of palladium (II) oxide gas sensors.

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